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freemanjud
Posts: 57

Meet seven German citizens in the year 1921. All survived World War I.

  • Karl Schmidt Karl is an employed worker who lives in the rich steel-producing area of the Ruhr. Before the war, he worked in the steel mills. During the war, he was a soldier at the front. He plans to return to the steel mills now that the war is over. He has a wife and two children.
  • Eric von Ronheim Eric is the head of a Frankfurt textile factory. He was an officer in the war, but returned to his business after the war.
  • Gerda Munchen owns a small Munich grocery store started by her parents. She and her parents are saving money in the hope of enabling her to go to university in a few years.
  • Wilhelm Schultz works with his father on the family farm in East Prussia. His grandfather lives in Danzig; his uncle lives in the area only 5 miles away from the family farm, but now that the war has concluded, it’s part of Poland.
  • Hermann Struts Hermann, a lieutenant in the German army, fought bravely during the war. From a long line of army officers and as a graduate of a German military academy, he has taken pride in the army’s able defense of the nation and its strong leadership. He is a career military officer.
  • Elisabeth von Kohler Elisabeth is a prominent attorney who attended the University of Bonn. She has a strong sense of German tradition and believes passionately in her nation’s contributions to Western civilization.
  • Otto Hauptmann Otto works in a Berlin factory. He has joined a trade union and is an active member.

Select two of these seven. Be sure to identify who they are in bold in your post.

Now that you are well-informed about the Treaty of Versailles, the political parties of Weimar Germany, the effort to bring about democracy in the country, and the economic stresses of the 1920s-early 1930s in the country, how would your two “chosen” individuals have responded? What I’m asking here is that you try to imagine the world of post-World War I, post-Treaty of Versailles, and mid-Weimar Germany through each of these individuals’ eyes. How do you think each individual would react to the current events underway? What political parties would each have gravitated toward? What sort of change/action/worry would they have sought from their country and/or had for themselves and their families? Be certain that you use the documents/handouts you have:

  • the summary of the Treaty of Versailles,
  • the Weimar Constitution,
  • the Weimar political parties,

as well as reference the material we looked at in class related to the

  • Treaty of Versailles,
  • and Weimar politics, economics, and cultural life.

Please post on this and then look to see if anyone else posted on at least one of your individuals. Weigh in on whether you agree with your classmates’ assessment of this person’s views or whether you disagree. This may require checking back on the discussion thread a bit, after you’ve posted. You can add this comment as a second post in the thread.

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Ikasu
Posts: 28

Wilhelm and Eric

Before anything, these names are so interesting to me. Wilhelm sounds better than William for some reason and have von in your name makes you sound like a baron or someone very important. Starting with Eric, I think that he would be very stressed out with the inflation that happened in Germany. Though he is the head of a textile factory, his money slowly become valueless as the inflation keeps going. Becoming poor when you were once in a good state is not the best thing for anyone. I think Eric would be in the DNVP or the German National People's Party. He wouldn't be in the Nazi party because he might be considered to be rich in a way and the Nazi party is hostile to the wealthy. Eric would want a stable economy where he can be in a good state again. Wilhelm is different to Eric. Wilhelm is still German but his farm land is in Poland. He would be angry that he might not own that land any more. The inflation would hit him and he would struggle to get enough money for food. He would either join the Nazis or the Communist Party. If he joined the Nazis, he would be able to have his land in Germany again. If he joined the Communist Party, he would have a stable income of money to live on. Either way he would win in some way. He would have to fight for his land or even work even harder to be stable.

Question: Would people who believed in a God leave that party to join another one because of harsh times? Is there anything that might proved that?

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coconut
Posts: 38

Weimar Republic and the People

Karl Schmidt: The steel mills were able to gain a lot of revenue because of the war and products were in high demand so workers were also in high demand, but, after the war ended, the business won’t be as prosperous anymore, most likely resulting in layoffs. Even though he was serving as a soldier in the war, the company he worked for, hired other people to replace the him and the rest of the men who got drafted, and after they came back from the war, they won’t be given their jobs back nor will they be able to find a job easily. Karl would be distressed because of how difficult it is for him now to provide for his wife and two children due to economic stresses especially upon the face of insane inflation, where he wouldn’t even be able to buy a decent meal or at least a loaf of bread even for millions of marks. Due to unemployment issues and inflation, he would definitely be left to worry for how he can provide for his family and get a job. I think Karl would originally be part of the german social democratic party, who drew support from the working and lower middle classes, but as economic upheaval occurs by the increase of unemployment and inflation, I think post-war, he would gravitate toward one of the extremes--probably more so in support of the Nazis as Hitler proposed “peace, land, bread”.

Eric Von Ronheim: His factory was thriving during the war, creating a more than comfortable economic position for him and him earning a fortune. Although post-war, his fortune would have been destroyed because of inflation. This factory, along with other factories would dwindle in their products’ demand and revenue, especially since foreign countries imposed tariffs on German products and the rise of inflation limiting people’s ability to purchase cloths. A reduced, miniscule number of people would still buy their product as they were barely even able to purchase other necessities such as food, which would’ve been 90% of their income. Eric would’ve definitely been concerned of the growing inflation and the loss of his business’s power. Eric would be a part of the German National People’s Party as it was supported by landowners and industrialists.

My question is: Did veterans from the war receive any benefits?


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coconut
Posts: 38

Originally posted by Ikasu on February 14, 2018 17:20

Before anything, these names are so interesting to me. Wilhelm sounds better than William for some reason and have von in your name makes you sound like a baron or someone very important. Starting with Eric, I think that he would be very stressed out with the inflation that happened in Germany. Though he is the head of a textile factory, his money slowly become valueless as the inflation keeps going. Becoming poor when you were once in a good state is not the best thing for anyone. I think Eric would be in the DNVP or the German National People's Party. He wouldn't be in the Nazi party because he might be considered to be rich in a way and the Nazi party is hostile to the wealthy. Eric would want a stable economy where he can be in a good state again. Wilhelm is different to Eric. Wilhelm is still German but his farm land is in Poland. He would be angry that he might not own that land any more. The inflation would hit him and he would struggle to get enough money for food. He would either join the Nazis or the Communist Party. If he joined the Nazis, he would be able to have his land in Germany again. If he joined the Communist Party, he would have a stable income of money to live on. Either way he would win in some way. He would have to fight for his land or even work even harder to be stable.

Question: Would people who believed in a God leave that party to join another one because of harsh times? Is there anything that might proved that?

I agree that Eric would be concerned about the growing inflation and that he would be part of the DNVP , and yes, I don't think he would be a part of the Nazi party because they are hostile to wealth, and since Eric runs a once-prosperous textile factory, he would want to gain back his fortunes and wealth which the Nazis were against of.

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helena71
Posts: 25

Karl Schmidt, an employee in the steel mills and a soldier at the front line of the war, has experienced not only the horrors of fighting in a war, but also the battle that comes after with the Treaty of Versailles. He think the treaty is an embarrassment to Germany and is quite unhappy with the lack of gratitude coming to the German soldiers. Now, he’s reached a point where he doesn’t exactly know who to blame other than the ruling class, capitalism, liberalism, and communism. All of which can be put under the umbrella of blame of the so-called ‘Jewish conspiracy’. Unfortunately, Karl is probably not very educated, so it is easy to blame one group of people for such a devastating loss and such aggravating consequences. Since the times were not good after the war, more and more people gravitated to extremist political parties. For Karl, his frustrations and beliefs were perfectly embodied by the NSDAP, also known as the Nazi party. As for work, Karl needs to support his family, and he might not know this but the inflation is going to make a sufficient amount of money a very hard thing to acquire. He will probably have some difficulty finding a job in the steel business in Ruhr because of France and Belgium’s occupation of it between 1923 and 1925 since Germany failed to continue its réparation payments. Again, this will be extremely stressful for Karl since his sole goal will be to support his family, who he feels deserves his whole attention, as he has been away at war.


Gerda Munchen, a young girl whose parents own a store and who dreams of going away to university, will have a hard time turning her dreams into a reality. Unfortunately, due to the extreme inflation that is about to come, her parent’s business will probably take a hit. She will resent the Treaty of Versailles for its seemingly reasonable monetary demands, as she will feel like her family is the one paying for Germany’s loss in World War I. For the most part, Gerda won’t mind the Weimar Constitution as it does mention that there will be “suffrage of all German citizens of either sex” meaning that there won’t be gender based discrimination. She will probably gravitate towards a more leftist party like the SPD because parties on the left were more supportive of progressive taxation, government social welfare programs, labor unions, equality and economic opportunity for women, all of which relate perfectly to Gerda’s life.

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hocmodo
Posts: 32

Days of Our Lives

Otto Hauptmann needs his job in a factory to keep himself alive. He lives paycheck to paycheck and hardly gets by, but things would be much worse if he didn’t have his trusty trade union. Otto isn’t a man of radical standards, it’s just not his way, but he does love being a member of the German Social Democratic Party. Before he joined his trade union, he wasn’t very politically active, but now he’s heavily involved in his union and local politics in general. He was worried he would be laid off when his factory could no longer produce heavy artillery, luckily it was repurposed as a toothpaste tube factory and his union keeps him in a job.

Eric von Ronheim was a very different man before the war than he was after. His factory thrived, he was the most popular man in his town, and he truly loved his country. He loved his country so much in fact that he became an officer in the war. After the war, he was infuriated by article 231 which said that Germany must take complete blame for starting and continuing the war. When he came home, his factory was hardly running, the economy was crashing, and his patience was running low. Eric, the once wealthy and admirable business man was now hardly getting by and laying off workers left and right (who were trying to unionize). One day Eric walked into a meeting for the German Workers’ Party, intrigued by the name and fed up with the Weimar Republic. The rest is history...

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hocmodo
Posts: 32

Originally posted by coconut on February 14, 2018 18:13

Karl Schmidt: The steel mills were able to gain a lot of revenue because of the war and products were in high demand so workers were also in high demand, but, after the war ended, the business won’t be as prosperous anymore, most likely resulting in layoffs. Even though he was serving as a soldier in the war, the company he worked for, hired other people to replace the him and the rest of the men who got drafted, and after they came back from the war, they won’t be given their jobs back nor will they be able to find a job easily. Karl would be distressed because of how difficult it is for him now to provide for his wife and two children due to economic stresses especially upon the face of insane inflation, where he wouldn’t even be able to buy a decent meal or at least a loaf of bread even for millions of marks. Due to unemployment issues and inflation, he would definitely be left to worry for how he can provide for his family and get a job. I think Karl would originally be part of the german social democratic party, who drew support from the working and lower middle classes, but as economic upheaval occurs by the increase of unemployment and inflation, I think post-war, he would gravitate toward one of the extremes--probably more so in support of the Nazis as Hitler proposed “peace, land, bread”.

Eric Von Ronheim: His factory was thriving during the war, creating a more than comfortable economic position for him and him earning a fortune. Although post-war, his fortune would have been destroyed because of inflation. This factory, along with other factories would dwindle in their products’ demand and revenue, especially since foreign countries imposed tariffs on German products and the rise of inflation limiting people’s ability to purchase cloths. A reduced, miniscule number of people would still buy their product as they were barely even able to purchase other necessities such as food, which would’ve been 90% of their income. Eric would’ve definitely been concerned of the growing inflation and the loss of his business’s power. Eric would be a part of the German National People’s Party as it was supported by landowners and industrialists.

My question is: Did veterans from the war receive any benefits?


I definitely agree with your thoughtful depiction of Eric. I see the image of a once proud man turned to radicalism because he needs some sort of change. I'm also wondering this, I'm guessing that if they did, the benefits weren't that spectacular.

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North24
Posts: 37

Hermann Struts and Gerda Munchen

I believe that Hermann Struts would have been interested in the DNVP or DAP parties, mostly because he fought in the war and had strong nationalistic feelings towards his country. Struts took pride in the German army’s leadership and defense, and so, he could have been angered by the full blame that was put on Germany in the Treaty of Versailles and its heavy punishments. The treaty also diminished the German army, which could have caused him to lose his military position. Such as loss would have angered Struts due to his love for the country and because of his love for the army. Strong feelings against the treaty and the heavy punishments that the treaty brought could have prompted him to join an extreme party.

Gerda Munchen would have been greatly affected by the inflations that occurred after the war since she owned a small grocery store. The high inflation was an effect of the high reparations that Germany had to pay in the Treaty of Versailles, which Munchen would have disagreed with since she (along with many other working citizens) began to lose money. Germany printed high amounts of money to try to repay its debt, because of this, the money that Munchen and her parents had saved for her future education would have been worthless. Although the inflation affected her negatively, the Weimar Constitution (which stated that all men and women were equal) would have brought her more rights as a woman. Because of this, I think that Munchen would have backed the SPD because of its support of these rights and of working and middle-class citizens, which she is a part of.

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Elephants
Posts: 36

Weimar Germany and the people

I think Hermann Struts would hate the place in which Germany is at post-World War I, post-Treaty of Versailles, and mid-Weimar Germany. He is very patriotic and takes pride in his German culture. I believe this would force him to want to take lead and make a change. I believe he would be in either the DNVP or the Nazi party because he seems very right winged. He’ll want to restore Germany to its previous glory. I think this is why he’d want to overthrow the Weimar republic and he would hate the treaty of Versailles because it stripped Germany of everything. He would use his wealth and privilege as being a lieutenant in the German army to his advantage.

I think Eric von Ronheim would miss the benefits he got from being a soldier. I agree with coconut in the sense that I think he would be concerned about high inflation. I think he would be scared that he’d lose his business and he wouldn’t be able to survive in this new economy. I also think he would want to fight this. His level of confidence would also be wounded to some extent because as hocmodo said he went from being an officer in war and having a thriving business to barely surviving in this new economy. I think he would gravitate towards the DNVP or Nazi party because he was once an officer in war/wealthy so he has the status to go into either one of these political parties. I think if it wasn’t for the inflation he would be fine, but it led him to take extreme measures, because financially he wouldn’t be able to survive.

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North24
Posts: 37

Originally posted by helena71 on February 14, 2018 18:40

Karl Schmidt, an employee in the steel mills and a soldier at the front line of the war, has experienced not only the horrors of fighting in a war, but also the battle that comes after with the Treaty of Versailles. He think the treaty is an embarrassment to Germany and is quite unhappy with the lack of gratitude coming to the German soldiers. Now, he’s reached a point where he doesn’t exactly know who to blame other than the ruling class, capitalism, liberalism, and communism. All of which can be put under the umbrella of blame of the so-called ‘Jewish conspiracy’. Unfortunately, Karl is probably not very educated, so it is easy to blame one group of people for such a devastating loss and such aggravating consequences. Since the times were not good after the war, more and more people gravitated to extremist political parties. For Karl, his frustrations and beliefs were perfectly embodied by the NSDAP, also known as the Nazi party. As for work, Karl needs to support his family, and he might not know this but the inflation is going to make a sufficient amount of money a very hard thing to acquire. He will probably have some difficulty finding a job in the steel business in Ruhr because of France and Belgium’s occupation of it between 1923 and 1925 since Germany failed to continue its réparation payments. Again, this will be extremely stressful for Karl since his sole goal will be to support his family, who he feels deserves his whole attention, as he has been away at war.


Gerda Munchen, a young girl whose parents own a store and who dreams of going away to university, will have a hard time turning her dreams into a reality. Unfortunately, due to the extreme inflation that is about to come, her parent’s business will probably take a hit. She will resent the Treaty of Versailles for its seemingly reasonable monetary demands, as she will feel like her family is the one paying for Germany’s loss in World War I. For the most part, Gerda won’t mind the Weimar Constitution as it does mention that there will be “suffrage of all German citizens of either sex” meaning that there won’t be gender based discrimination. She will probably gravitate towards a more leftist party like the SPD because parties on the left were more supportive of progressive taxation, government social welfare programs, labor unions, equality and economic opportunity for women, all of which relate perfectly to Gerda’s life.

I also agree with the fact that Gerda Munchen would have been drawn to more leftist parties because of her current social standing as a woman and as a working-class citizen. If her store was affected by inflation (which it probably was), then I think that parties such as the SPD could have provided her with some support that would cause her to gravitate towards them.

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Elephants
Posts: 36

Originally posted by North24 on February 14, 2018 19:46

I believe that Hermann Struts would have been interested in the DNVP or DAP parties, mostly because he fought in the war and had strong nationalistic feelings towards his country. Struts took pride in the German army’s leadership and defense, and so, he could have been angered by the full blame that was put on Germany in the Treaty of Versailles and its heavy punishments. The treaty also diminished the German army, which could have caused him to lose his military position. Such as loss would have angered Struts due to his love for the country and because of his love for the army. Strong feelings against the treaty and the heavy punishments that the treaty brought could have prompted him to join an extreme party.

Gerda Munchen would have been greatly affected by the inflations that occurred after the war since she owned a small grocery store. The high inflation was an effect of the high reparations that Germany had to pay in the Treaty of Versailles, which Munchen would have disagreed with since she (along with many other working citizens) began to lose money. Germany printed high amounts of money to try to repay its debt, because of this, the money that Munchen and her parents had saved for her future education would have been worthless. Although the inflation affected her negatively, the Weimar Constitution (which stated that all men and women were equal) would have brought her more rights as a woman. Because of this, I think that Munchen would have backed the SPD because of its support of these rights and of working and middle-class citizens, which she is a part of.

I liked your take on Hermann Struts. I agree with you, I think he does have a very strong nationalistic view. I also liked how you mentioned that the treaty could have caused him to lose his military position, I would have never thought of that!

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princeofspices
Posts: 31

People of Weimar

Karl Schmidt: Karl was a member of the working class before the war. Looking to return to work in the steel mills will be difficult for Karl after the war. He needs the money to support his family, but due to the economic crisis occurring in the middle of the Weimar period, that may not be as easy as it sounds. The steel mills may have had to lay off many workers due to the inflation and returning to his job may be impossible for Karl. This would make him extremely angry, especially since he has a family to support. Karl would likely be living in poverty with his family and struggle to make ends meet. It would be especially hard for him if he suffered ptsd from the war, which many WWI veterans did. Karl would likely be infuriated at the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, especially those taking away land from Germany (since he was a dedicated soldier and risked his life for his country). His lack of money and anger towards the treaty would likely drive Karl towards the NSDAP because they were hostile towards wealth and privilege of the upper class. This party would likely also draw Karl in because he would not be keen towards the decline in moral standards due to the fact that he has a wife and children to protect and he does not want them living in a dangerous world. His main concerns would be the safety of his family and his unstable economic situation.

Wilhelm Schultz: Wilhelm’s family has been extremely affected by the Treaty of Versailles. His uncle living only 5 miles away from the family farm no longer lives in Germany, but now Poland. His grandfather now lives in Danzig, the free city under the control of the League of Nations now situated in Poland. Both Danzig and the land his uncle lives on were once German lands. The attitude of most Germans living in Danzig was extremely negative––they were upset that they were no longer living in their home country. Wilhelm would share this same attitude. He would be angry at the Treaty for taking away the lands of his family and converting them into non-German territories. Due to this, Wilhelm would have an increased sense of nationalism and be concerned with putting Germany back on top. He is also from the lower working class, since he is a farmer. During the economic strife in the beginning of the Weimar Republic, Wilhelm’s farm probably struggled and he is still trying to recover financially. I believe that Wilhelm would drift to the SPD because it was relatively moderate and supported by a lot of the working class. Wilhelm would probably want to live in stability so a moderate political party would make the most sense for his ideals and priorities. His major concerns would be his strong sense of nationalism and desire to regain German land and maintaining a stable financial situation.

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princeofspices
Posts: 31

Originally posted by helena71 on February 14, 2018 18:40

Karl Schmidt, an employee in the steel mills and a soldier at the front line of the war, has experienced not only the horrors of fighting in a war, but also the battle that comes after with the Treaty of Versailles. He think the treaty is an embarrassment to Germany and is quite unhappy with the lack of gratitude coming to the German soldiers. Now, he’s reached a point where he doesn’t exactly know who to blame other than the ruling class, capitalism, liberalism, and communism. All of which can be put under the umbrella of blame of the so-called ‘Jewish conspiracy’. Unfortunately, Karl is probably not very educated, so it is easy to blame one group of people for such a devastating loss and such aggravating consequences. Since the times were not good after the war, more and more people gravitated to extremist political parties. For Karl, his frustrations and beliefs were perfectly embodied by the NSDAP, also known as the Nazi party. As for work, Karl needs to support his family, and he might not know this but the inflation is going to make a sufficient amount of money a very hard thing to acquire. He will probably have some difficulty finding a job in the steel business in Ruhr because of France and Belgium’s occupation of it between 1923 and 1925 since Germany failed to continue its réparation payments. Again, this will be extremely stressful for Karl since his sole goal will be to support his family, who he feels deserves his whole attention, as he has been away at war.


Gerda Munchen, a young girl whose parents own a store and who dreams of going away to university, will have a hard time turning her dreams into a reality. Unfortunately, due to the extreme inflation that is about to come, her parent’s business will probably take a hit. She will resent the Treaty of Versailles for its seemingly reasonable monetary demands, as she will feel like her family is the one paying for Germany’s loss in World War I. For the most part, Gerda won’t mind the Weimar Constitution as it does mention that there will be “suffrage of all German citizens of either sex” meaning that there won’t be gender based discrimination. She will probably gravitate towards a more leftist party like the SPD because parties on the left were more supportive of progressive taxation, government social welfare programs, labor unions, equality and economic opportunity for women, all of which relate perfectly to Gerda’s life.

I agree with your assesment of Karl Schmidt. I too think that he would drift towards joining the NSDAP due to financial concerns and his desire to protect his family. I liked you point about his possibility of being uneducated driving him towards the Nazi party. I did not think of that, but I completely agree. He was a working class man and then a soldier so it is likely that he did not have an education. This would be dangerous as it would drive him to find someone to blame for things he could not understand. I thought that was a vey insightful point.

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babe1907
Posts: 22

Weimar Germany and the people

Hermann Struts is a career military officer. He fought bravely in the war and has a ton of pride in his countries military. After their defeat in the war he is angry and devastated that they lost the war and the result of the Treaty of Versailles. He cannot believe they can only have 100,000 people in their army because, as a man who takes pride in their able defense of the nation, he can’t see how they can defend themselves against other countries now. He joined the German National People’s Party because he wants the return of a strong military force to lead his country back into power.


Karl Schmidt is returning from the war looking to return to his job in the steel mills so he can provide for his family. Little does he know that he is most likely not going to be able to get his job back due to the ongoing economic crisis. Inflation raises the prices of everything dramatically making it even harder for him to support his family than it was before. He joins the German Social Democratic Party with many of his former colleagues who have also lost their jobs and are looking to support their families.
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babe1907
Posts: 22

Originally posted by princeofspices on February 14, 2018 19:56

Karl Schmidt: Karl was a member of the working class before the war. Looking to return to work in the steel mills will be difficult for Karl after the war. He needs the money to support his family, but due to the economic crisis occurring in the middle of the Weimar period, that may not be as easy as it sounds. The steel mills may have had to lay off many workers due to the inflation and returning to his job may be impossible for Karl. This would make him extremely angry, especially since he has a family to support. Karl would likely be living in poverty with his family and struggle to make ends meet. It would be especially hard for him if he suffered ptsd from the war, which many WWI veterans did. Karl would likely be infuriated at the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, especially those taking away land from Germany (since he was a dedicated soldier and risked his life for his country). His lack of money and anger towards the treaty would likely drive Karl towards the NSDAP because they were hostile towards wealth and privilege of the upper class. This party would likely also draw Karl in because he would not be keen towards the decline in moral standards due to the fact that he has a wife and children to protect and he does not want them living in a dangerous world. His main concerns would be the safety of his family and his unstable economic situation.

Wilhelm Schultz: Wilhelm’s family has been extremely affected by the Treaty of Versailles. His uncle living only 5 miles away from the family farm no longer lives in Germany, but now Poland. His grandfather now lives in Danzig, the free city under the control of the League of Nations now situated in Poland. Both Danzig and the land his uncle lives on were once German lands. The attitude of most Germans living in Danzig was extremely negative––they were upset that they were no longer living in their home country. Wilhelm would share this same attitude. He would be angry at the Treaty for taking away the lands of his family and converting them into non-German territories. Due to this, Wilhelm would have an increased sense of nationalism and be concerned with putting Germany back on top. He is also from the lower working class, since he is a farmer. During the economic strife in the beginning of the Weimar Republic, Wilhelm’s farm probably struggled and he is still trying to recover financially. I believe that Wilhelm would drift to the SPD because it was relatively moderate and supported by a lot of the working class. Wilhelm would probably want to live in stability so a moderate political party would make the most sense for his ideals and priorities. His major concerns would be his strong sense of nationalism and desire to regain German land and maintaining a stable financial situation.

I agree with just about everything you said about Karl Schmidt. He would not be able to get his job back and as a result he would struggle to support his family after the war. However, I think Karl would have joined the German Social Democratic Party because it had a strong backing of the working and lower middle classes which falls right into his situation. Most people he knew from his job before the war would be in similar situations to him and join that party so I think he would join the party with people who can relate to him the most

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