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freemanjud
Posts: 57

Meet seven German citizens in the year 1921. All survived World War I.

  • Karl Schmidt Karl is an employed worker who lives in the rich steel-producing area of the Ruhr. Before the war, he worked in the steel mills. During the war, he was a soldier at the front. He plans to return to the steel mills now that the war is over. He has a wife and two children.
  • Eric von Ronheim Eric is the head of a Frankfurt textile factory. He was an officer in the war, but returned to his business after the war.
  • Gerda Munchen owns a small Munich grocery store started by her parents. She and her parents are saving money in the hope of enabling her to go to university in a few years.
  • Wilhelm Schultz works with his father on the family farm in East Prussia. His grandfather lives in Danzig; his uncle lives in the area only 5 miles away from the family farm, but now that the war has concluded, it’s part of Poland.
  • Hermann Struts Hermann, a lieutenant in the German army, fought bravely during the war. From a long line of army officers and as a graduate of a German military academy, he has taken pride in the army’s able defense of the nation and its strong leadership. He is a career military officer.
  • Elisabeth von Kohler Elisabeth is a prominent attorney who attended the University of Bonn. She has a strong sense of German tradition and believes passionately in her nation’s contributions to Western civilization.
  • Otto Hauptmann Otto works in a Berlin factory. He has joined a trade union and is an active member.

Select two of these seven. Be sure to identify who they are in bold in your post.

Now that you are well-informed about the Treaty of Versailles, the political parties of Weimar Germany, the effort to bring about democracy in the country, and the economic stresses of the 1920s-early 1930s in the country, how would your two “chosen” individuals have responded? What I’m asking here is that you try to imagine the world of post-World War I, post-Treaty of Versailles, and mid-Weimar Germany through each of these individuals’ eyes. How do you think each individual would react to the current events underway? What political parties would each have gravitated toward? What sort of change/action/worry would they have sought from their country and/or had for themselves and their families? Be certain that you use the documents/handouts you have:

  • the summary of the Treaty of Versailles,
  • the Weimar Constitution,
  • the Weimar political parties,

as well as reference the material we looked at in class related to the

  • Treaty of Versailles,
  • and Weimar politics, economics, and cultural life.

Please post on this and then look to see if anyone else posted on at least one of your individuals. Weigh in on whether you agree with your classmates’ assessment of this person’s views or whether you disagree. This may require checking back on the discussion thread a bit, after you’ve posted. You can add this comment as a second post in the thread.

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Lena
Posts: 14

When Karl Schmidt was a younger man he worked in Ruhr, an extremely rich steel producing area of Germany. Then the war hot and he fought as a soldier at the front. Now that the war is over and done with Karl intends to go back and pick up where his life left off working in the steel mill providing for his wife and 2 kids. So what does he do now? Karl´s main ambitions lie in providing a decent life for his family, but the treaty of Versailles makes that possibility a little hard to predict. On one hand, Germany is now required to build thousands upon thousands of tons of shipping (which will require steel) but on the other hand they are forbidden to manufacture tanks, warplanes, battleships and submarines. Due to these new restrictions his livelihood hinges on whoever will support the working class enough for those new demands to work out well for him. The Weimar republic doesn't leave Karl in the worst position, so I don't think he would lean into the DAP, but the Zentrum is an entirely different story. A man with a wife and 2 kinds just wanting to make an honest living would be all for the party that had been supporting middle and working class Catholics. Unfortunately Karl would most likely still suffer through the mid to late 20´s and would also most likely end up pretty angry at all the other countries that screwed Germany over. He was a soldier once, depending on how his first experience was he may be motivated to fight again.


Gerda Munchen, although also she´s also a humble working class citizen, has some different motivations. Gerda owns a grocery store in Munich that was started by her parents. Her main goal now that the war is over is to save enough money (with the help of her parents) to go to university. Something to note in this case is that Gerda is, in fact, a woman. Many times throughout history girls don't get many rights no matter how stable, modern or functional the government is, but this time it's different! According to article 109 Weimar Constitution ¨men and women have the same fundamental civil rights and duties¨, and in addition, according to a whole bunch of other articles power is supposed to come from the everyday people (like grocery store owners for example) of Germany now and that would seem awesome to a little working class 20-something full of hope for her future. We know how well that constitution ends up working out, but if I were any of these people back then I wouldn't think Article 48 would ever be relevant, it just seems too unbelievable and silly, so Gerda would probably trust the constitution. That trust would most likely lead her away from most of the government parties, but she would probably favor the SPD or USPD based on their democratic tendencies and support to people just like her. Knowing what ends up happening to Germany a few years later, Grenda probably never went to university… but who knows! She seems like shes got enough determination and work ethic to get the job done
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number four
Posts: 18

Weimar Germany and the People

I imagine that Hermann Struts would join the Nazi party upon his return from the war. Being a lifelong member of the German military, he seems like the kind of German citizen who would be especially bitter about his country's defeat in the first world war, and would likely turn to the more radical Conservative party of the country. He would most definitely be extremely mad about the treaty of versailles. He would probably be a strong proponent for a powerful and imperialistic Germany, and when the treaty took away all of Germany's colonies and also greatly reduced it European land holds, he was probably greatly irked. He would probably expect the newly formed government to attempt to return Germany to its former glory by rebuilding the entire army and fighting for the lands that were taken away from them in the treaty of versailles.

Elizabeth von Kohler would be another example of a German citizen that is likely to become a member of the Nazi party after the end of World War 1. I feel like her more traditional German beliefs and values would make her align more with the right or conservative side of the political spectrum. If she wasn't as radical of a conservative as a Nazi, she would at least most likely be more of a DVP or Z. She was probably like most traditional German citizens and worshipped the former Kaiser like a god and wants Germany to return to their imperialistic ways, mainly because her belief in the spreading of German values as a beneficial thing for the West.

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youngsolar
Posts: 17

The Hills are Alive (With the Sound of Changes)

As an officer in the war, Eric von Ronheim saw some of the worst possible human atrocities in the trenches. Friends being gassed and shot, boys being forced into manhood much sooner than they should have been, former workers in his textile factory biting the bullet (literally). After the war, Eric was lucky enough to return home to his family. He suffered injuries and survived gasings, so he returned to his factory a hero. The factory that had made the rubber for gas masks for those who fought with Eric returned to creating normal rubber products, but, along with most of the country, once the German economy crumbled due to the harshness of the Treaty of Versailles, Eric’s factory fell on hard times. However, due to the wealth he built up before the war, Eric was able to sleep and eat comfortably as others starved. As Germany rebuilt itself and its government, Eric found himself aligning with the DNVP, due to their support of industrialist and the upper classes, where Eric found himself.


On the other hand, Otto Hauptmann found himself on hard times after the war ended. Once the Treaty of Versailles was enacted, Otto was forced into working more at his factory to help Germany repay its enemies. Even though Otto managed to avoid fighting in the war, he still found himself thrust into its effort. As inflation rose and the economy began to crumble, Otto and his family began to struggle. Otto’s wages were not enough to pay for food and rent and other daily expenses. There were often nights where Otto’s family starved, waiting in lines at food pantries and soup kitchens, trying to obtain a morsel of food while the well-off watched on in comfort as the lower classes suffered. Hoping the rebuilding of the German government will help out the poor, Otto aligns himself with the SPD. The SPD stands by the working classes in their times of need and serves for the common people, which Otto needs: someone who serves for him.

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potatosalad
Posts: 32

Gerda Munchen: she would probably be in the German Social Democratic party (SPD), as she and her family have a small family owned grocery store (in the working/middle class). She also is trying to save money for her college education, so she would want a more equitable form of earning money. As for economics, she would be very concerned about the inflation– since money was losing its value and prices were rising, it would endanger her store, possibly closing it down. Also, the economy’s instability may prevent her from getting her university education. In response to The Treaty of Versailles, Gerda would probably dislike it– since Germany had to pay back other European countries for the damages in war, the taxes would probably be raised in Germany, which would be harder for her and her family to sustain themselves. As for the art, Gerda would have liked it, because it was a modern, new form of art that represented freedom and the lower classes.


Elisabeth von Kohler: she would be in the German People’s party (DVP). She is a successful attorney with good education, insinuating that she is probably older and doesn’t care about the upcoming generations. She also strongly fights for German traditions rather than changes, so she would be on more of the right wing political parties. Since she is proud of Germany’s contributions to Western civilizations, she would probably be in favor of The Treaty of Versailles, even though it damaged Germany by taking away some of their land, lose all of its colonies, and had to pay billions of dollars in reparations. Elisabeth would be okay with these actions, as long as they benefited the other European countries and put Germany in a better place. As for the artwork being produced, she would be against New Objectivity and Dada. German art at this time was very eccentric, expressive, and modern, in contrast to the traditional views that Elisabeth held. There were also some paintings that made fun of the rich, and since Elisabeth was part of the upper class, she would have disapproved of it. She would be afraid of the changes of money and the German Reich, because she advocates for traditions.
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potatosalad
Posts: 32

Originally posted by number four on February 14, 2018 17:09

I imagine that Hermann Struts would join the Nazi party upon his return from the war. Being a lifelong member of the German military, he seems like the kind of German citizen who would be especially bitter about his country's defeat in the first world war, and would likely turn to the more radical Conservative party of the country. He would most definitely be extremely mad about the treaty of versailles. He would probably be a strong proponent for a powerful and imperialistic Germany, and when the treaty took away all of Germany's colonies and also greatly reduced it European land holds, he was probably greatly irked. He would probably expect the newly formed government to attempt to return Germany to its former glory by rebuilding the entire army and fighting for the lands that were taken away from them in the treaty of versailles.

Elizabeth von Kohler would be another example of a German citizen that is likely to become a member of the Nazi party after the end of World War 1. I feel like her more traditional German beliefs and values would make her align more with the right or conservative side of the political spectrum. If she wasn't as radical of a conservative as a Nazi, she would at least most likely be more of a DVP or Z. She was probably like most traditional German citizens and worshipped the former Kaiser like a god and wants Germany to return to their imperialistic ways, mainly because her belief in the spreading of German values as a beneficial thing for the West.

Although I do agree that Elisabeth would be on the right wing/more conservative side of the political spectrum, I feel like she wouldn't entirely become a Nazi, since they were hostile to wealthy/the upper class, and she's a well-educated attorney.

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peppermint
Posts: 30

The People of Germany

I feel that small grocery store owning Gerda Munchen would be absolutely devastated by the post-WW1 inflation in Weimar Germany that hit so especially hard around the period 0f 1922-1923. I feel like she would feel disillusioned, and lost, like the majority of the world population in this post war era, especially due to the pointless nature of the war. She would be educated, despite her working class upbringing, aware of the Treaty of Versailles and the implications the massive debt being owed to Germany's wartime enemies would have on her families grocery store, and her future higher education aspirations. She would sit and watch as customers paid in thousands, and thousands, of Deutschemarks. She herself is fairly left leaning but over the years, she watched her parents turn to Nazi sympathizers as they were intrigued by the slogan "peace, love, bread", appealing to them as they had little business left in their grocery store.

Hermann Struts through his high ranking position in the German Army, was able to avoid most of the horrors of the trenches in World War I. However that did not mean he was exempt from his own fair share of bloodshed. Upon returning from the war, he was completely and totally distraught by the lack of order in Weimar Germany in the year of 1919. With the growth of communist practice and protests, Hermann felt threatened. In his attempt to restore his own perception of "law and order", Hermann decided to join the Freikorps. He joined the right leaning DNVP, before eventually being drawn into the Nazi party itself. He longed for the day when article 48 of the German Constitution would be enacted, to restore order in what he viewed as a fragile state.

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number31
Posts: 24

Weimar Germany

Karl Schmidt acted as a soldier during WW1 and now plans to return to his previous job in the steel mills. I believe that his life after WW1 and after the Treaty of Versailles and mid Weimar Germany, would be hard and tiring for him as there would be a good amount of work to do in this area. Since Germany had to give up so much after the war and practically left with nothing, as they also could not build anything like boats and warships so that they would not try and start war with any other country after the treaty of Versailles was established. They now had to create shipping because Germany had to ship out large amounts of goods to other countries which would require the skill of someone with the skill of Karl in the steel industry. This man was likely to support the SPD as it aimed to support the lower and middle classes, and had support mainly between the 1920s-1930s. He most likely would have been in economic trouble because he has a wife and 2 kids to support and Germany was left with basically nothing after the treaty of Versailles and forced to rebuild from the ground up.

Otto Hauptmann is working in a Berlin factory suggesting he is a working class man and most likely on the poorer side. He does not have a family to support and is an active member in a trade union. He is now basically forced to start working in factories to produce supplies that Germany owes to other countries after the treaty of Versailles. I assume that Otto was lucky enough not to have to participate in the war, but now because the economy was in a decline late 1920s he was one of the worst to suffer as he could not support simple cost of living and even at worst not able to afford food. This caused for an abundance of starving workers during this time period. As said before, the German government is in rebuild mode and Otto would most likely affiliate himself with the SPD as well because it supported the working and lower class people in economic time of struggle.

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number31
Posts: 24

Originally posted by number four on February 14, 2018 17:09

I imagine that Hermann Struts would join the Nazi party upon his return from the war. Being a lifelong member of the German military, he seems like the kind of German citizen who would be especially bitter about his country's defeat in the first world war, and would likely turn to the more radical Conservative party of the country. He would most definitely be extremely mad about the treaty of versailles. He would probably be a strong proponent for a powerful and imperialistic Germany, and when the treaty took away all of Germany's colonies and also greatly reduced it European land holds, he was probably greatly irked. He would probably expect the newly formed government to attempt to return Germany to its former glory by rebuilding the entire army and fighting for the lands that were taken away from them in the treaty of versailles.

Elizabeth von Kohler would be another example of a German citizen that is likely to become a member of the Nazi party after the end of World War 1. I feel like her more traditional German beliefs and values would make her align more with the right or conservative side of the political spectrum. If she wasn't as radical of a conservative as a Nazi, she would at least most likely be more of a DVP or Z. She was probably like most traditional German citizens and worshipped the former Kaiser like a god and wants Germany to return to their imperialistic ways, mainly because her belief in the spreading of German values as a beneficial thing for the West.

I agree with the social parties these two are located because you can sense the strong nationalist opinions in the descriptions and sense of revenge and urgency in Germany.

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peppermint
Posts: 30

Originally posted by number four on February 14, 2018 17:09

I imagine that Hermann Struts would join the Nazi party upon his return from the war. Being a lifelong member of the German military, he seems like the kind of German citizen who would be especially bitter about his country's defeat in the first world war, and would likely turn to the more radical Conservative party of the country. He would most definitely be extremely mad about the treaty of versailles. He would probably be a strong proponent for a powerful and imperialistic Germany, and when the treaty took away all of Germany's colonies and also greatly reduced it European land holds, he was probably greatly irked. He would probably expect the newly formed government to attempt to return Germany to its former glory by rebuilding the entire army and fighting for the lands that were taken away from them in the treaty of versailles.

Elizabeth von Kohler would be another example of a German citizen that is likely to become a member of the Nazi party after the end of World War 1. I feel like her more traditional German beliefs and values would make her align more with the right or conservative side of the political spectrum. If she wasn't as radical of a conservative as a Nazi, she would at least most likely be more of a DVP or Z. She was probably like most traditional German citizens and worshipped the former Kaiser like a god and wants Germany to return to their imperialistic ways, mainly because her belief in the spreading of German values as a beneficial thing for the West.

I definitely agree about your assertion about Hermann Struts, I also placed him as a future member of the Nazi party due to his high social class and militaristic aims.

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HibiscusFlower
Posts: 29

Two Opposing Women

I wanted to predict the parties of the two women out of the 7 German citizens, especially because they stood on very far sides of the financial and left/right-winged spectrums. I also wanted to choose the two women because we hear relatively little about the political power of German women in these decades, and I know they would be some politically active ladies. Elisabeth von Kohler, described as a nationalist lawyer who "believes passionately in her nation's contributions to Western society" was most likely upset by the Treaty of Versailles, which effectively destroyed Germany's progress and halted their production along with any strong sense of nationalism. She would have been proud of the artistic and intellectual contributions Weimar was making in the 10's and 20's and want that to continue, all the while remaining angry at the ruling of the Treaty of Versailles. If I were to place her in a particular party, I would say she was part of the German People's Party; the party is described as one taken up by professional in upper and middle classes, which she would definitely fall into the category of, and also preached heavy Nationalism and anti-republican sentiment, which she would also be interested. I do not think that she would later switch to the German National People's Party later on in 1928, however, because it seems almost too right-winged for one who believes in the Weimar Republic and its contributions to Western culture.

Gerda Munchen, however, may have been on the complete other side of the political spectrum, being a relatively low class grocery store owner who wishes to spend money on education. She would fall into the leftist /liberal side of German politics at the time, most likely in support of Weimar and its global intellectual contributions and hoped to be part of that as a university student perhaps. She most likely lost much more of her money because of the intense currency inflation as well as the money Germany constantly owed for decades after the Treaty of Versailles, and could be against the war entirely, possibly part of the group who did not understand why it was being fought in the first place. She would strive left in politics, most likely landing in the German Social Democratic Party, who were not overtly radical socialists, but maintained the egalitarianism that moderate socialists would, which is why the support was largely backed by working lower and middle classes, those who strived for equality in a politically and financially separated Germany.

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HibiscusFlower
Posts: 29

Originally posted by peppermint on February 14, 2018 20:08

I feel that small grocery store owning Gerda Munchen would be absolutely devastated by the post-WW1 inflation in Weimar Germany that hit so especially hard around the period 0f 1922-1923. I feel like she would feel disillusioned, and lost, like the majority of the world population in this post war era, especially due to the pointless nature of the war. She would be educated, despite her working class upbringing, aware of the Treaty of Versailles and the implications the massive debt being owed to Germany's wartime enemies would have on her families grocery store, and her future higher education aspirations. She would sit and watch as customers paid in thousands, and thousands, of Deutschemarks. She herself is fairly left leaning but over the years, she watched her parents turn to Nazi sympathizers as they were intrigued by the slogan "peace, love, bread", appealing to them as they had little business left in their grocery store.

Hermann Struts through his high ranking position in the German Army, was able to avoid most of the horrors of the trenches in World War I. However that did not mean he was exempt from his own fair share of bloodshed. Upon returning from the war, he was completely and totally distraught by the lack of order in Weimar Germany in the year of 1919. With the growth of communist practice and protests, Hermann felt threatened. In his attempt to restore his own perception of "law and order", Hermann decided to join the Freikorps. He joined the right leaning DNVP, before eventually being drawn into the Nazi party itself. He longed for the day when article 48 of the German Constitution would be enacted, to restore order in what he viewed as a fragile state.

First of all, I love your plot-rich backstory of Gerda, and now I want you to make a movie about her (please). I would definitely watch that movie ;) Either way, I never thought about the understanding she may have had as a moderately informed citizen, and I subsequently never considered how she may have understood why the war had created the massive amounts of inflation and poverty that plagued Germany. I would argue that she was leaning a little more left than just "fairly", and I don't know if I see her parents becoming Nazi sympathizers, as I see her parents as people in support of her and her education, and that does not mesh with being Nazi sympathizers, but I see how its possible with the fear that existed in this difficult time in their history.

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mrschickenfingers
Posts: 34

Elisabeth and Karl

Elisabeth von Kohler is nationalistic and traditional--she appears to be rather confident in the superiority of the German people, as she “believes passionately in her nation’s contributions to Western civilization.” Thus, it is likely that Elisabeth finds the Weimar Constitution to be unsatisfactory, for it violates German tradition. In article 1, the constitution establishes Germany as a democratic republic in which “political authority emanates from the people.” If she is traditional, then Elisabeth likely opposes such revolutionary and democratic ideology. Members of the German People’s Party and German National People’s Party tended to be nationalistic and anti-republican. Such people wanted Germany to return to its monarchical ways, and it is likely that Elisabeth shares in this view if she is nationalistic. As Elisabeth is clearly an avid supporter of the German nation, I would expect her to be opposed to the Treaty of Versailles, which treats Germany very harshly and which reduces its power. I think that Elisabeth would certainly be susceptible to the influence of the Nazi, given her nationalistic and traditional mindset (the Nazi’s were extremely nationalistic and traditional).


I also think it's possible that Elisabeth’s post-war life could assume an entirely different characteristic. Since she attended university and is educated, Elisabeth could have been involved in the German Democratic Party, as this was often the party of intellectuals. Also, Elisabeth is adamant in her support of German culture, suggesting that she approves of the Weimar Republic’s vibrant artistic life--perhaps she thought of Germany’s various artistic movements during this period as uniquely German. Nevertheless, considering her traditional and nationalistic outlook on Germany, I am hesitant to believe that Elisabeth would have approved of artists like George Grosz, who ridiculed the bourgeoisie, and Otto Dix, who portrayed war as inherently horrific. The Nazis in particular felt that such artwork was treasonous by nature, for it undermined the strength of the German nation by suggesting that war was evil. Such negative perceptions of war would have been very contradictory to German tradition, which was heavily defined by the powerful German military. So, although Elisabeth was educated, I believe that she would have aligned with the conservative ideology that existed on the extreme right of the German political spectrum during the 1920s. It's likely that she would have advocated for a return to German tradition particularly by decrying Weimar cultural life. She also would have been interested in reasserting German power, perhaps by enacting the provisions of article 48 that allow for the suspension of the relatively liberal Weimar constitution.


It is also interesting to consider Karl Schmidt’s existence in Weimar Germany. As Schmidt fought on the front lines of World War I, I wonder if he would have been vehemently opposed to war. Otto Dix, for example, experienced World War I from the trenches; as seen in his artwork, he clearly developed an anti-war attitude. Many German artists who experienced the trauma of trench warfare expressed similarly horrific perceptions of war in their artwork. Thus, I think that it's reasonable to assume Schimdt’s anti-war attitude. He certainly does not boast a military legacy--instead, he is a steel mill worker. It is therefore understandable that Schmidt might be opposed to the glorification of war. I believe that Schmidt would have aligned himself with political groups that were either centrist or slightly leftist, as such groups, unlike conservative parties, did not avidly support war and nationalism. Schmidt hails from the working class, suggesting that he might find the German Social Democratic Party’s platform satisfactory. Also, Schmidt is from a rich steel-producing area, so I think that his financial circumstances are generally stable. When there is such stability, people tend not to assume extreme positions: Schmidt likely would have participated in the German Democratic Party and German Social Democratic Party. It's also possible, however, that Schmidt might have possessed nationalistic views as a person from the Ruhr: during the Weimar period, France ultimately occupied this region as a form of reparation payment. This occupation would have certainly antagonized people from the Ruhr, fomenting nationalistic sentiments that could have driven people like Schmidt into the arms of Germany’s conservative parties. If Schmidt felt this way, then perhaps he would have supported the reassertion of German power that the Nazis so often preached. Otherwise, if he maintained a centrist or slightly leftist mindset, perhaps Schmidt would have simply advocated for German stability in regard to the economy.

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mrschickenfingers
Posts: 34

Originally posted by HibiscusFlower on February 14, 2018 20:47

I wanted to predict the parties of the two women out of the 7 German citizens, especially because they stood on very far sides of the financial and left/right-winged spectrums. I also wanted to choose the two women because we hear relatively little about the political power of German women in these decades, and I know they would be some politically active ladies. Elisabeth von Kohler, described as a nationalist lawyer who "believes passionately in her nation's contributions to Western society" was most likely upset by the Treaty of Versailles, which effectively destroyed Germany's progress and halted their production along with any strong sense of nationalism. She would have been proud of the artistic and intellectual contributions Weimar was making in the 10's and 20's and want that to continue, all the while remaining angry at the ruling of the Treaty of Versailles. If I were to place her in a particular party, I would say she was part of the German People's Party; the party is described as one taken up by professional in upper and middle classes, which she would definitely fall into the category of, and also preached heavy Nationalism and anti-republican sentiment, which she would also be interested. I do not think that she would later switch to the German National People's Party later on in 1928, however, because it seems almost too right-winged for one who believes in the Weimar Republic and its contributions to Western culture.

Gerda Munchen, however, may have been on the complete other side of the political spectrum, being a relatively low class grocery store owner who wishes to spend money on education. She would fall into the leftist /liberal side of German politics at the time, most likely in support of Weimar and its global intellectual contributions and hoped to be part of that as a university student perhaps. She most likely lost much more of her money because of the intense currency inflation as well as the money Germany constantly owed for decades after the Treaty of Versailles, and could be against the war entirely, possibly part of the group who did not understand why it was being fought in the first place. She would strive left in politics, most likely landing in the German Social Democratic Party, who were not overtly radical socialists, but maintained the egalitarianism that moderate socialists would, which is why the support was largely backed by working lower and middle classes, those who strived for equality in a politically and financially separated Germany.

I'm not quite sure if I agree that Elisabeth would have approved of Weimar Germany's artistic movements. Since she is traditional and nationalistic, I am hesitant to believe that she would have been satisfied with artistic movements like expressionism, new objectivity, and dadaism, all of which tended to critique the German family, class structure, and war. These movements were rather avant-garde, entirely moving beyond German tradition. I think that she would have seen Weimar art and culture as contrary to German tradition and therefore out of place in the nation.

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much05
Posts: 29

Germany in the Eyes of others

*I wrote these in the point of view of each individual.

Elisabeth von Kohler: Elisabeth is a prominent attorney who attended the University of Bonn. She has a strong sense of German tradition and believes passionately in her nation’s contributions to Western civilization.

l am greatly ashamed for the actions done by Germany. Before the war, I strongly believed in the efforts of Germany and despite the German forces going against Western powers ,I held my hea up high for the sake of Germany . However, I see people suffering, therefore I cannot support anyone. I believed that Western Powers would be kind to us. We had not even started the war, we were just helping our allies in the efforts. Yet because of the treaty of Versailles, the German people suffered, all at the hands of what? I doubt very well that taking away our own livestock will benefit us in some manner. What is happening in Weimar? Well for the most part I am absolutely on board. The German Reich will finally be governed by the people rather than some monarch who does not even know what the people of Germany want. All of it seems to be in order except one part: article 48. Although I can understand that this is only a precaution and in no way will this ever come into action, this part of constitution can easily revoke all of the other articles, leaving the german people with absolutely no power. How absurd! For all I know, this could easily backfire but I have hope in our country and those in charge. As far as I'm concerned, all we need is to get out of this ghastly depression and move on with our lives. I am grateful that I have both the money and the food to go about my days without any struggle. Those poor families. Mothers, daughters, and sons not knowing whether or not they will be able to eat today. The switches Volkspartei will know what to do. They always seem to know. This party embodies everything I want for the future. They think about the german people for once, and the wellbeing. As we move along in time, those german traditions will confuse to be fostered in each and every one of us.

Otto Hauptmann: Otto works in a Berlin factory. He has joined a trade union and is an active member.

It has been days without food, warmth, and clothes. I had thought the war itself was bad, but this is even worse. The Treaty of Versailles was a filthy thing for the allied nations to do. It's even worse that the Germany army lost due to inside forces stabbing each and every soldier in the back. And how have I been repaid for fighting in the war? Starving children and no food. I am happy to say that the Weimar Constitution will make all of these matters significantly better. Have you seen that the Reichstag will be composed of all German people? The very same people who have worked for Germany through the good and the bad times. The very same people who know what we need. And the very same people who will benefit the most from this. Nowadays, I see all this art around the city. Why do artists paint the struggles of the people? Why would they take our misery as their inspiration? The only thing that is pushing me forward and giving me back the hope that was ripped from my hands is DAP. They fight for our causes, not the causes of the wealthy. Each day I try to evaluate the needs of the workers and each day, I get nothing back from those in charge of us. I am certain that the DAP will give us what we need; food, money, and the Germany we deserve to have.

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