posts 46 - 53 of 53
coolcat16
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 9

Originally posted by buttercup on October 22, 2023 14:29

The ideas of race science were appealing to Europeans and Americans because it reduced their cognitive dissonance associated with their racist actions and beliefs. White people wanted to preserve their superiority over other races (superiority complex) and they believed race science justified their actions. These white people acted so controlling over other races because they were actually insecure, and their cruel actions stem from a place of weak self-esteem and sense of identity. In other words, white people act superior because they are scared of feeling lesser than anyone else, so in order to get ahead, they create race science to give them a reason to feel better about themselves.


There was a wide variety of different impacts each policy/law had on society. For the Gentleman’s Agreement and the Chinese Exclusion Act, they led to a decrease in the immigration of Japanese and Chinese people to the US. They isolated Asians already in the country from the rest of American society based on the idea of polygenism and/or being separate but equal. The annexations of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines were all based on the idea of the white man’s burden. This idea was published only a little over a century ago, and it is the belief that white people have the duty to civilize the other races because they are savages and not as developed as the white race is (they are not capable of governing themselves). It is connected to race science in that it believes all non-whites are inherently inferior to white people and their race is the cause of their lower intelligence and skill levels. The convict lease system, which was essentially a continuation of slavery, is also connected to race science in that they used the white man’s burden and arguments of race science to justify their actions (ex. Black people are completely different species, they are inferior to whites, and they need to be kept in check).


Although they have been “debunked,” the beliefs of scientific racism and differences between races are certainly still with us in society. Racial discrimination can be seen all over the world, such as police brutality targeted towards Black people, sinophobia during the COVID-19 pandemic, racial profiling/stereotyping, bullying on the basis of race, and microaggressions. These ideas remain prevalent in society because it is propelled by the instinct to categorize people as “us versus them.” They begin to think about how the “us” is superior to the “other,” which establishes a hierarchy, so then they begin to dehumanize and treat the “other” badly in order to affirm their belief that they are superior. Applying this to the idea of race, white people identify with their own race, then classify everyone else as inferior and as completely different species of human (the main idea of race science). This helps them justify their actions of segregation, enslavement, colonization, etc. Although this is not the common belief in the present, the effects of these beliefs and the actions of white people are knitted into the fabric of American society (systemic racism, wealth gap, etc.).


One statement I resonated with was “recognizing privilege and using that to uplift people of color, as well as hearing and listening to their stories, is one way that white people can help,” which was stated by pigeondrivesabus. I agree with this because white people should not be speaking on behalf of minorities and should instead use their privilege to spread the voices of people of color. In order to help counter racist ideology, critical race theory should be taught in schools, and issues concerning race need to be discussed with clear definitions. It should be a working discussion with real action involved. Also, race, racism, and the history of it all should not be swept under the rug to rush in a new era of color-blindness and a non-racial society. Saini says in Is Race Science Making a Comeback? “... race is real in society. It's real in politics. It's real in the ways that we treat each other. It's visceral because we have made it visceral in our everyday lives, and it has a biological impact because of that.” I agree with her statement because although race is a social construct, it matters because we have made it matter, and has devastating effects that are hard for privileged people to see. The hierarchy we have constructed has led to racial disparities in basically all aspects of society. So really, we have fallen into our own trap, and this complex issue is something that takes everyone’s strength and effort to fix. But I believe we will be able to fix it, even if it does take a long time!!

Something very interesting that I hadn't thought about before I read this response was how white people used cognitive dissonance to lessen the impact of their actions, and how race "science" helped increase and justify that cognitive dissonance. I was also intrigued on how you explained that white people were insecure about their own place in society, so they had to convince themselves that it was their job to civilize different races. I agree that even though these ideologies have been outdated, they are still very prevalent in society. This is especially seen in wage gaps, which I hadn't thought about. I also enjoyed the wording and use of language in this response, it is very well articulated.

blotitout
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 10

Originally posted by behappy19 on October 21, 2023 14:33

Europeans and Americans believed that they were part of the superior race of the world. This was obviously false; however, the ideals of race “science” supported their beliefs. Along with being the “superior” race, Europeans and Americans felt as though they were “obliged” to “civilize” groups of people who were deemed inferior to them. This was seen with the creation of The Indian Residential School System in America as well as Canada. The objective of these “schools” were to assimilate Native American children into society, but this was false. The actual truth behind the creation of this system was that it wanted to erase native American culture completely. Europeans and Americans blindly believed in race “science” because it benefited them as it gave them a “valid” reason to colonize other countries and blatantly ignore their rights as human beings. The Berlin Conference is a prime example of this since it was a discussion between the western countries about the partitioning of Africa. This conference led to the mistreatment of many African tribes specifically the genocide of the Herero people by Germany. Race “science” gave these colonizers “justification” for their terrible actions and further incentive to “civilize” the world.

The United States of America prided itself on being a land of freedom, but this just was not the case. People of color were treated as second class citizens and were forced to endure policies and rulings such as Plessy vs. Ferguson. Plessy vs. Ferguson was an important Supreme court case that legitimized the “separate but equal” doctrine for public facilities. The public facilities offered for people of color were inferior in service and accommodations which appealed to the idea that white people were the superior race. Although the United States claimed that all citizens were equal their laws proved that this was not the case. Segregation emphasized the pseudo-science belief that people of different races should be classified differently. Race “science” gave white Americans “justification” for going against the Constitution. In modern America people of color continue to be segregated through the separation of neighborhoods. People of color are often affected by redlining which favors lower class white neighborhoods over lower class black neighborhoods. Furthermore, the lack of opportunities and privilege are still precedent in today’s society for people of color. An example of this is how people of color are more likely to be wrongfully imprisoned. This can be tied back to the Convict Lease System. This system used a loop hole in the 13th amendment to gain free labor. Those who were targeted were people of color because they were viewed as “sub-human.” Today there is a higher percentage of people of color incarcerated because they do not have the privilege of being able to navigate the justice system.

Believe it or not, race “science” ideals are still prevalent in society, although the methods used to prove these differences were incredibly flawed. White supremacist groups continue to be active today and even perform protests. Although the KKK may not be as prevalent as it once was there are still people who are part of the far-right terrorist organization. These ideas still exist because there are still major divides between races. In the article, “Is 'Race Science' Making A Comeback?” Shereen Marisol Meraji states, “I've read genetics textbooks on race that say race is all silly — we should all let it go and live in this kind of colorblind world. Well, no, because that's not the world that we live in. These things matter, because that boy when I was 10 years old did not throw rocks at me because of genetics.” Racism has been embedded into society for so long that it will not just fade away even though this “science” has been debunked. To counter the revival of this ‘new’ racist ideology is to keep it from infiltrating politics. Race and politics should not be intertwined because everyone should be treated equally. If this is not done then racist rulings and laws can be passed and the United States will go back to how it was in the 19th and early 20th centuries.








This response made a lot of points that were very similar to mine. We both touched on how race science made Europeans feel justified for the oppression of minority groups because there was "scientific evidence" that justified them treating different groups as inferior. This response also talked about the oppression of African Americans and how it affects their place in American society today. We both agreed that while race science is less prevalent today, it sort of took on a new form and because of this people still discriminate between groups through stereotypes etc. Both of us also touched on how the historical significance of race and the ways in which this history affects us today kind of forces us to still talk about the concept even if it was disproven.

souplover
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 10

Originally posted by bumblebeetuna on October 23, 2023 06:50

Race science was extremely attractive to white Europeans and Americans during the 19th and 20th centuries because it legitimized two of the most important factors of their growth: colonization and capitalism. The Berlin Conference of 1884 cemented colonization as the primary way Europe would increase their power for the next century. America soon followed in the 20th century, colonizing native American lands, the Philippines, and Hawaii. Colonies were so important because they provided raw materials, free labor, and markets for goods produced at home. But people at home knew colonization was violent, messy, and unchristian, no matter how good the propaganda. This led to a lot of cognitive dissonance; members of European societies, many of them Christians, felt wrong about colonizing on the basis of economic growth. Race science was the solution for leaders. By pushing forth the idea that God had designed non white people to be servants to white people, and that the people they were colonizing were a different, subhuman species, people at home felt fine about supporting their nation’s colonization.


And at home, race science catalyzed capitalism by prolonging slavery. Capitalism relied on ever increasing profits which relied on free or very cheap labor. Enslaved people had provided that free labor for a long time. But abolition movements of the 19th century and the impending civil war threatened to remove that force. Scientific racism changed the justification for slavery from economic grounds to religious and cultural ones. Americans believed that the enslavement of Black people must continue, not because of economic necessity, but rather to fulfill God’s desires and follow biology. This is why Louis Agassiz’s works were cited by southern plantation owners. Once the 13th Amendment was passed, race science still appealed to capitalists because it was a way to placate mistreated white workers and continue churning profits. Laws like the Black Codes, Plessy vs Ferguson and Jim Crow laws which, as we learned from classmates' presentations, upheld a “separate but equal" doctrine, reinforced a superiority complex for white people. This meant they were more willing to work in crappy conditions because of the sense of confidence gained from “knowing they’re better than Black people”. Essentially, the rich class prevented class-consciousness and solidarity among the working class across race lines by using policies influenced by scientific racism.


By 1950 white Americans had internalized how the dehumanization of Black people and other POC led to success for white people. Therefore white supremacy became baked into the mythology or “sense of origin story”, as Angela Saini puts it. This mythology continues today. In the classical music world, there’s a lot of racism towards Black musicians. A pianist on Instagram, Jamal, (@jianissimo) often shares how people are very surprised at his skill and wonder how he got so good. Though this is usually a compliment on the outside, it’s tinged with race science views that different races have different aptitudes for various skills, like music. As Angela Saini reflects in the article “Is ‘Race Science’ Making A Comeback?”, “our societies still “play on these assumptions and stereotypes and the lack of education that we have around these issues, and they make us believe that identity is biological''.


It seems like in 2023, many people feel that because “full equality” has been achieved, therefore any differences in performance among “races' ' are “proof' ' of our biological differences. First off, there’s not full equality; policies like redlining continue to place POC in food deserts at higher rates, as mentioned in the presentation on Jim Crow. Secondly, it takes more than a generation or two to reverse hundreds of years of systematic oppression.

In response to this negative influence of race science in 2023, highlighting racial differences and how they become essential to our identity can be a healing force. For example, groups like Outdoor Afro exist as safe spaces for Black people to exist in normally white-dominated environments. They aren’t saying “we hate white people” but rather “we deserve space to just be outdoors, and not have to be “the Black person” outdoors. Because as souplover mentions, race is so ingrained in all areas of life now that it needs to be addressed for its negative effects to be overcome. And to counter new racist ideology, there needs to be some restriction on users spouting hateful information online, which is where a lot of it spreads. Once people are outside and interacting with each other, everyone sees how false race science is and how human we all are.



I thought that the statement that it takes "more than a generation or two to reverse hundreds of years of systematic oppression" was very encouraging. Personally, there are times when I feel very discouraged about the progress of anti-racism, but it helps to remember that mainstream anti-racism has only existed since the post-1950s. This is not to detract from the work of previous anti-racists, but the majority of the population being anti-racist has only existed recently, as well as anti-racist policies. I think that the belief that "full equality" has been achieved is part of the reason behind people who object to today's movements for equality. They say that feminism is anti-men or that BLM is anti-white people because they believe that there is already equality, there is no work to be done, and people are now trying for hierarchy.

tatertots
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 8

Originally posted by buttercup on October 22, 2023 14:29

The ideas of race science were appealing to Europeans and Americans because it reduced their cognitive dissonance associated with their racist actions and beliefs. White people wanted to preserve their superiority over other races (superiority complex) and they believed race science justified their actions. These white people acted so controlling over other races because they were actually insecure, and their cruel actions stem from a place of weak self-esteem and sense of identity. In other words, white people act superior because they are scared of feeling lesser than anyone else, so in order to get ahead, they create race science to give them a reason to feel better about themselves.


There was a wide variety of different impacts each policy/law had on society. For the Gentleman’s Agreement and the Chinese Exclusion Act, they led to a decrease in the immigration of Japanese and Chinese people to the US. They isolated Asians already in the country from the rest of American society based on the idea of polygenism and/or being separate but equal. The annexations of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines were all based on the idea of the white man’s burden. This idea was published only a little over a century ago, and it is the belief that white people have the duty to civilize the other races because they are savages and not as developed as the white race is (they are not capable of governing themselves). It is connected to race science in that it believes all non-whites are inherently inferior to white people and their race is the cause of their lower intelligence and skill levels. The convict lease system, which was essentially a continuation of slavery, is also connected to race science in that they used the white man’s burden and arguments of race science to justify their actions (ex. Black people are completely different species, they are inferior to whites, and they need to be kept in check).


Although they have been “debunked,” the beliefs of scientific racism and differences between races are certainly still with us in society. Racial discrimination can be seen all over the world, such as police brutality targeted towards Black people, sinophobia during the COVID-19 pandemic, racial profiling/stereotyping, bullying on the basis of race, and microaggressions. These ideas remain prevalent in society because it is propelled by the instinct to categorize people as “us versus them.” They begin to think about how the “us” is superior to the “other,” which establishes a hierarchy, so then they begin to dehumanize and treat the “other” badly in order to affirm their belief that they are superior. Applying this to the idea of race, white people identify with their own race, then classify everyone else as inferior and as completely different species of human (the main idea of race science). This helps them justify their actions of segregation, enslavement, colonization, etc. Although this is not the common belief in the present, the effects of these beliefs and the actions of white people are knitted into the fabric of American society (systemic racism, wealth gap, etc.).


One statement I resonated with was “recognizing privilege and using that to uplift people of color, as well as hearing and listening to their stories, is one way that white people can help,” which was stated by pigeondrivesabus. I agree with this because white people should not be speaking on behalf of minorities and should instead use their privilege to spread the voices of people of color. In order to help counter racist ideology, critical race theory should be taught in schools, and issues concerning race need to be discussed with clear definitions. It should be a working discussion with real action involved. Also, race, racism, and the history of it all should not be swept under the rug to rush in a new era of color-blindness and a non-racial society. Saini says in Is Race Science Making a Comeback? “... race is real in society. It's real in politics. It's real in the ways that we treat each other. It's visceral because we have made it visceral in our everyday lives, and it has a biological impact because of that.” I agree with her statement because although race is a social construct, it matters because we have made it matter, and has devastating effects that are hard for privileged people to see. The hierarchy we have constructed has led to racial disparities in basically all aspects of society. So really, we have fallen into our own trap, and this complex issue is something that takes everyone’s strength and effort to fix. But I believe we will be able to fix it, even if it does take a long time!!

I totally agree with buttercup that although race is a social construct, it has had devastating effects because we as people have made it matter. It may be a concept, but with very real consequences. It does exist in politics and the way we treat each other. Humans's nature to categorize forces us to recognize our differences, and although that isn't necessarily a bad thing, it can be. Recognizing differences is fine, but it's the way we treat others that makes it matter. Will you choose to hate someone because they're different? I also like the enthusiasm that we will be able to fix it, although I personally disagree. I think because of free will, which is neutral, that causes a mixture of good and bad. So that means that there will always be a cause to fight for, someone who will always disagree. I don't believe we can change, especially in such a deep-rooted system that has been going on for so long. It's going to take a serious uproot for our system to change.

Mapa307
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 10

The ideas of race “science,” even though we know they are undeniably wrong, still exist in society today. One of the best examples of this, as Angela Saini points out, is the false idea that certain races are genetically predisposed to have a certain disease. For example: sickle-cell disease is common in parts of North and West Africa because of the prevalence of malaria in those same areas, against which sickle-cell disease protects. Saini explains that because the ancestors of many Black people in America were enslaved West Africans, there are higher rates of sickle cell disease among Black Americans than white Americans. This leads some to claim that Black people are predisposed to sickle-cell disease, when in reality, people from a certain geographical region are. That mistaken belief is an example of modern race “science.”


As Saini thus suggests, once race “science” was introduced, it became part of social practices and political policies that remain, or at least have an impact, today. For example: redlining. Redlining labeled Black people as high-risk borrowers, and then divided residential areas into zones of high and low risk mortgages. Banks only loaned money to Black families buying houses in high risk areas, where houses were less valuable, thus preventing Black families from building generational wealth at all or at the same rate as white families. The practice of redlining rested on viewing Black people as inherently inferior and outsiders, which is exactly how race “science” described Black people.


Racist ideas persist both in American policies and in American cultural attitudes, which enable such policies. For example, the Indian Adoption Program would not have been possible had not white America believed Indigenous people to be “savage” and inherently inferior, thus requiring Indigenous children to be “saved.” I would argue that racist ideas are so strong in the United States because colonial and recently post-colonial American society was based on economic independence, achieved through land expansion (thus forcing Indigenous peoples off their land) and slavery. Both of these horrific practices have impacts today. For example, Indigenous tribes have been pushed onto reservations, which the government is supposed to support, but which are, in reality, underfunded and often include food deserts. In addition, the federal and state governments make it difficult for people who live on reservations to vote with restrictions on mail-in voting, and many states have recently created laws designed to make it more difficult for Black people to vote. Perhaps the most obvious example of the legacy of racism is the drastic racial wealth gap in the United States.


Countering this “new” racist ideology requires that we first understand that it is not new, and it follows that we enact monetary reparations for people hurt by policies built on scientific racism. However, the biggest challenge in countering racist ideology is countering the social-psychological theories that support it. For example, the cognitive dissonance caused by one group of people oppressing another is resolved by claiming that the oppressed group is inferior, and therefore, dismantling racist ideology requires people to come to terms with the fact that their ancestors, and in some cases, themselves, hurt others for no reason. Accepting such a truth can be quite difficult, but it is the only way to prevent racist ideology from continuing unchallenged.

Vines&Roses
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 5

Race Science Is Wrong!

The ideas of race ‘science’ have been appealing to so many white Europeans and Americans, in the 19th and early 20th centuries, because it gives them a scientific reason to justify everything they did/are doing. Science has always been used as a thing to justify peoples actions or to explain a phenomenon, so once there was a ‘scientific’ reason found for people to be racist and bigoted many jumped at the opportunity. Using science to back an opinion up only allowed white people to continue racism and calling themselves superior to other races. Justification is the number one thing for everyone no matter the topic. This can be connected back to the holocaust and how Hitler felt justified in his actions because he felt like the Jewish weren’t “pure” and didn’t deserve to be considered human beings. A major idea in history is justifying actions and science is just a great way to do that because no one argues with something that is “scientifically” proven. As cbgb1946 said, the ideas of race science were only beneficial because it worked in the white races favor. It helped no one but white people because race science is all about white being the superior race. It brings up the idea of Us v. Them, the ‘us’ being all white people and the ‘them’ being every other ‘inferior’ race.

The idea that white people were superior helped push so many racist and bigoted movements and laws like the KKK and Jim Crow Laws. White people felt like people of other races had to be ‘managed’ and needed to be diminished or controlled by the ‘superior’ race. Race science helped push that ideology into politics and gave groups like the KKK a reason to continue doing what they were doing. White people felt like they didn’t have to treat other races as human beings because they were simply considered as not the same species, per Louis Agassiz’s ideas. The idea that white people were superior was kind of already subconsciously believed by most due to Africans previous status of slaves and being forced to do whatever a white man told them to. This is reflected in the common phrasing of a white man calling a black man “boy”. This term was used to belittle African Americans and force the idea that African Americans are beneath them. White people have believed they are superior to other races for years and race science was the perfect opportunity to bring that idea to life and make something big out of it. These ideologies can go all the way back to Meso-american civilizations (Aztec, Inca, Maya) where Europeans felt like they had to ‘fix’ the ‘uncivilized’ people and the Europeans felt like they were better than the people in Meso-america. If people of different races are considered different species then that is even more of a reason to treat different races as inferior.

The lasting impact of these ideas can still be seen today through the ways people of color are treated. The ideas of race science are clearly still embedded in many white Americans' subconscious and it can be seen throughout society. People of color are usually associated with a negative connotation in many white Americans minds due to past racist ideologies. These biases stem from ideas like a white woman clutching their purse if they are next to an African American. There is also the common thing of police brutality towards African Americans and the idea that African Americans are ‘dangerous’ and ‘rowdy’. We as a society have kind of naturally segregated people of color and white people. Due to different incomes of different jobs that are subconsciously assigned to people of different races. Most people will always expect a ‘good’ job being associated with a white person while a ‘bad’ job is associated with people of color. That then leads to neighborhoods being racially divided because people with a low paying job can’t afford to live in a good neighborhood. Race science and racism might always be something that is prevalent within the human race and some people might always have the idea that white people are better than everyone else.

seeperspective
Boston, Massachusettes, US
Posts: 8

Lasting Impacts of Race 'Science' in the United States

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries race ‘science’ was a justification for many Europeans and Americans. It allowed them to stay in power and use their advantage to maintain economic success. Creating a category that makes other humans seem less than human was a way to suggest that whatever treatment they received was well deserved. A quote from Gavin Evans’ article titled The unwelcome revival of ‘race science’ supports the idea that people will look to justify a terrible action that isn’t warranted. “In July 2016, for example, Steve Bannon, who was then Breitbart boss and would go on to be Donald Trump’s chief strategist, wrote an article in which he suggested that some black people who had been shot by the police might have deserved it. “There are, after all, in this world, some people who are naturally aggressive and violent,” Bannon wrote, evoking one of scientific racism’s ugliest contentions: that black people are more genetically predisposed to violence than others.” These ideas are still persistent in modern day and there doesn’t seem to be an end in sight. Though it is illegal to now discriminate against someone because of their race or religious background, it still happens in lawful settings or transactions.


Once the pseudo-scientific ideas of race crept into policies and laws in the United States, it created a period of human and subhuman where people could be lawfully discriminated against. These impacts are still reverberated in financial situations. A bank could lawfully reject a person's loan request because of where they live, otherwise known as redlining. In Ramin Skibba’s article titled The Disturbing Resilience of Scientific Racism she explores the idea that scientists don’t lay far above the political fray of racial ideas and biases. Skibba suggests that they use science as a wall to hide their racist views. “While few people study or advocate for eugenics today, some scientists in the rapidly advancing field of genetics held onto related ideologies after World War II. They simply used different terms, Saini points out, as some continued with race-focused research while referring to ‘populations’ and ‘human variation’ rather than ‘races’ and ‘racial differences.’” Though it is appalling that these views are still held, it is not surprising. We are still only 200 years from Johannes Blumenbach’s theory on The Natural Variety of Mankind.


These ideas are still with us, even though we know the signs and methods of how they can come about. These ideas still persist because they still serve their intended purpose, to keep those ‘deserving’ of power in power. To counter this new racist ideology society would have to restructure a handful of laws and policies that allow businesses, organizations, or institutions to discriminate because of someone's background. But to do this, the world needs to shift its inherent need to categorize people because that is where these issues stem from, by thinking someone is better or less than because of where they come from.

Starboy
Boston, Massachusettes, US
Posts: 6

Eugenics

It was appealing because it gave them a sense of superiority, which would already feel very appealing and positive to a lot of people, and would give them benefits. As nicehair85 put it “The majority of europeans and americans were white people and the idea of being superior to another entire group would look enticing as they would then be treated differently and receive benefits over the inferior groups. It would give them the status that they would seek.” Also, like what My Year of Rest and Relaxation said, “They thought this was necessary because their jobs were taken away by people of different color so instead of using their labor to benefit the economy, they decided to remove them from the country and take away their jobs.”, racism would have freed up some jobs for the white population of America and some of this happened in the early twentieth century, during the great depression, so a few more jobs being available would’ve been a great relief to a lot of the population. Additionally, the early twentieth century was around World War One times so stuff like eugenics would be even more appealing. You’d be able to build a master race that would’ve been strong and smart and would’ve been able to easily win wars. Related socio-psychological ideas are cognitive dissonance, obedience theory, and group think. Cognitive dissonance is related because I imagine that’s a big reason why so many people were able to be so cruel. Sterilization was inhumane and awful but you could avoid any negative self images with a “sacrifice the few to save the many” mentality. “It’s ok to assign labels such as ‘idiots’ and ‘imbeciles’ to these disabled people because it’s for the betterment of society as a whole” and thoughts like that would have done wonders for everyone’s cognitive dissonance. Obedience theory was related as well because you would’ve had these big fancy well-to-do scientists telling you that it was true. Obedience theory would have gone doubly so for people in the lower classes because men like Galton would’ve had more authority over you than if you were someone in the same class as him. Additionally, people in the lower classes likely would receive a worse education than people in higher classes. This would have resulted in being the target of a lot of the propaganda that was being spread around at the time and therefore would have led to more pressure to be sterilized. Lastly, group think was related because of how popular eugenics was. If all of your friends and all of your neighbors are all going to the doctor to see if they’re eugenically fit then you’re going to feel very pressured to check your fitness as well. Plus, America and Britain have always had a bit of rivalry due to things like the Revolutionary War. If an American were to see that eugenics was popular in Britain they likely would have wanted to practice eugenics as well to sort of “prove” that America is just as good, if not better, than Britain.Race “science” and racial differences are definitely still with us today. The Smithsonian Magazine has an article by Ramin Skibba entitled “The Disturbing Resilience of Scientific Racism” this article states that “Saini cites an example of a 2017 study with statistical errors claiming that race and biology indicate that the airways of asthmatic black Americans become more inflamed than those of asthmatic white Americans. Black Americans do suffer more from asthma than whites do, but they’re also affected more by environmental hazards like air pollution from highways and factories as well as disparities in access to high-quality healthcare. These many forms of inequality and structural racism—which sociologists have documented for decades—were swept under the rug in favor of a race variable that led to findings that could be easily misinterpreted.” Improper terminology in experiments like the one shown above are what lead to race still persisting in the scientific world, as well as scientists just being plain racist. I’m not sure what could be done, but I know that race-blindness isn’t the way to go. NPR has an article by Jess Kung, Gene Demby, and Shereen Marisol Meraji with the title “Is ‘Race Science’ Making A Comeback?”. In the article Angela Saini says “I've read genetics textbooks on race that say race is all silly — we should all let it go and live in this kind of colorblind world. Well, no, because that's not the world that we live in. These things matter, because that boy when I was 10 years old did not throw rocks at me because of genetics. He threw rocks at me because I looked brown and that he took exception to that. And that's not going to stop.” Luckily, Saine is able to offer this as a start: “So I think all researchers, if they're going to invoke race, have to be really knowledgeable about where these ideas come from and how they are using race. Are they using it because they're studying the effects of racism and discrimination, or are they using it as a biological entity in itself? And if they're using it as a biological entity in itself, then they had better be sure exactly how they define it.”.
posts 46 - 53 of 53