posts 1 - 15 of 37
freemanjud
Boston, US
Posts: 318

Readings: Read at least 3 of these 6 (your choice as to which ones you read, though you are certainly welcome to read all)

(I have linked PDFs of these articles in Google classroom for those who hit the paywall from the Boston Globe or The Atlantic ☹ )


  1. Meghan E. Irons, Shelley Murphy, and Jenna Russell, “History Rolled in on a Yellow School Bus,” Boston Globe, September 6, 2014 https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/09/06/boston-busing-crisis-years-later/DS35nsuqp0yh8f1q9aRQUL/story.html OR https://drive.google.com/file/d/1syyYP4YyodGsXHcgE7C9dJtZOvED8J6d/view?usp=sharing

  1. Farah Stockman, “Did Busing Slow the City’s Desegregation?” Boston Globe, August 9, 2015.https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2015/08/08/did-busing-slow-boston-desegregation/5HXQbNFyuvD0SV4UdhNgAL/story.html OR https://drive.google.com/file/d/1SJY3mT2HLkjZ3T5qk2UJZgpu32CNd_zP/view?usp=sharing

  1. Farah Stockman, “How a Standoff Over Schools Changed the Country,” Boston Globe, December 20, 2015. https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/editorials/2015/12/20/how-standoff-over-schools-changed-country/oP7xEwikHvdAgjtc0lfNdN/story.html OR https://drive.google.com/file/d/13Oaq9udIFlOFVDTqRTfc6-Y4FXFD3p8b/view?usp=sharing

  1. Michael Patrick MacDonald, “Whitey Bulger, Boston Busing, and Southie’s Lost Generation,” Boston Globe, September 2, 2014. http://www.michaelpatrickmacdonald.com/articles-backend/2016/9/2/whitey-bulger-boston-busing-and-southies-lost-generation

  1. “Echoes of Boston’s Busing Crisis,” WGBH, Fall 2014. Students (now adults) reading the essays they wrote while 6th graders in 1974 at the Holmes Elementary School in Dorchester. [NOTE: Currently you cannot listen to the folks read their essays but if you click on the thumbnail image of each essay, you will be able to see the typescript of each short essay] http://projects.wgbhnews.org/busing-letters/

  1. Matthew Delmont, “The Lasting Legacy of the Boston Busing Crisis,” The Atlantic, March 29, 2016. https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/... OR https://drive.google.com/file/d/16pVJxSS1bWTJUTcZq76eEZT7GyTrCraD/view?usp=sharing


To understand the effect of the desegregation ruling of 1974 and its effect on the Boston public schools beginning in school year 1974-1975, you have to understand the state of schools in the city prior to 1974 AND to understand the demographic tidal wave that resulted as well.


In 1972, when the Morgan v. Hennigan case, charging that the School Committee had discriminated against their children, was filed in US District Court by black parents, there were 96,000 students in the Boston Public Schools. Approximately 60% of them were white. By 1988, the number of students in the BPS dropped to 57,000. At that time 24% of the students were white, 48% were black, 19% were Hispanic, and 8% were Asian. As of 2018, there are 56,000 students in 125 schools: 14% are white, 34% are black, 42% are Hispanic, 9% are Asian with 1% identifying as other/multiracial.


So to say that there has been a seismic shift in the population of the BPS would be an understatement at best.


In class (on Wednesday), we are looking at the very important segment from Eyes on the Prize (from the “Keys to the Kingdom” episode) on Boston busing [for anyone who was absent, here’s a link to an online version of the film via Kanopy, which you can access using your Boston Public Library account; you want to watch from 0:36 to 29:48]. You will also be looking at several additional short clips on this topic in class on Thursday.


Using these readings as well as the film(s) we looked at in class, weigh in on the following questions (and respond to what at least one previous student in the thread had to say):

  • Did the ends (desegregating the Boston public schools) justify the means (busing)?
  • Was desegregation a worthy goal or not?
  • Did change need to happen in the Boston Public Schools or were there other solutions to the remedy prescribed by Judge W. Arthur Garrity?
  • Can you imagine going to school in the environment of 1974-1975? What would have been tolerable? What would have been intolerable?
  • What do you see as the most visible effects today of the desegregation era of 1974-1975?

Again, make sure that in addition to your response, please be sure you respond to at least one previous student in the thread had to say. (You can do this within your post OR can write separately in a separate posting.)


REMEMBER: write your post in another window (not directly on the discussion board) because if you take too long, the board times out and you lose what you wrote! :-(((


SillyGoblinMan178
Brighton, MA, US
Posts: 10

Desegregating the Boston Public School system is something that absolutely had to happen, but busing was far from the ideal way of handling it. The main problem with busing was how sudden the change was. Out of nowhere, hundreds of Boston children were now going to new schools in neighborhoods they may have never even been in, all because of a court order. Granted, this court order was extremely justified; for years, schools in historically black neighborhoods had been underfunded and understaffed, leading to black students having a noticeably worse education than white students. Something had to change, but busing didn't get to the root of the problem. Instead of just putting black students in better funded white schools, the city should have improved the conditions of black schools and tear down systemic housing barriers to make moving to other neighborhoods more feasible for black families. I think that most going to school during the 1974-1975 school year would have a lot of fear and anxiety about going to school, but only because of the riots. I don't think that most teenagers would care that much about integration after a week or so of school, although some could definitely be influenced by their parents if they have hateful ideologies. The most visible effect of the desegregation era of 1974-1975 is Boston's reputation as America's "most racist city." It took twenty years after Brown v. The Board of Education for us to start integration, and when we did there were riots all across the city.

Babybackribs
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 10

Boston, race, redlining, and desegregation: What do we make of its legacy?

Desegregating the Boston Public schools system was necessary means to bringing about economic equality throughout Boston. However busing children to different parts of the city, was one of the worse ways the government could have handled it. The main problem with busing was that the state was divided on the whether or not it was necessary to provide lower income neighborhoods with the same level of education as other children from wealthier communities. With this in-cohesion, especially in the public school committee, came protest from the higher income neighborhoods who left like their rights were being taken away from them. Due to the fact that they were split, the governments only option was to rush out a bill granting black and colored students, the opportunity to go to school in area with good funding, and thus good education, like South Boston. It's hard to say whether or not Judge garrity had very many options because he does not control the wealth gaps in these neighborhoods, nor can he do anything to create new schools in Roxbury with good teachers and lots of supplies. The atmosphere and environment at these schools could have been very tense as there was a war between races going outside while students were trying to learn. I believe this intensity was also exemplified by the parents of the children, as most of us know we do tend to gravitate towards how are parents think and act because we were raised upon those principles. One the key visible affects of the desegregation era can be seen in the countries perception of Boston as the most racist towns in America. It also begins to pose the question of how the gentrification of neighborhoods like Forest hills, East Boston, and Back Bay will further segregate our city and lead to more desegregation efforts (new zip code system for exam schools).

Babybackribs
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 10

Originally posted by SillyGoblinMan178 on October 26, 2022 09:22

Desegregating the Boston Public School system is something that absolutely had to happen, but busing was far from the ideal way of handling it. The main problem with busing was how sudden the change was. Out of nowhere, hundreds of Boston children were now going to new schools in neighborhoods they may have never even been in, all because of a court order. Granted, this court order was extremely justified; for years, schools in historically black neighborhoods had been underfunded and understaffed, leading to black students having a noticeably worse education than white students. Something had to change, but busing didn't get to the root of the problem. Instead of just putting black students in better funded white schools, the city should have improved the conditions of black schools and tear down systemic housing barriers to make moving to other neighborhoods more feasible for black families. I think that most going to school during the 1974-1975 school year would have a lot of fear and anxiety about going to school, but only because of the riots. I don't think that most teenagers would care that much about integration after a week or so of school, although some could definitely be influenced by their parents if they have hateful ideologies. The most visible effect of the desegregation era of 1974-1975 is Boston's reputation as America's "most racist city." It took twenty years after Brown v. The Board of Education for us to start integration, and when we did there were riots all across the city.

It is really interesting why they just immediately implemented this busing system. It seemed very disorganized.

Snailaligator
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 10

Boston, race, redlining, and desegregation: What do we make of its legacy?

Segregation in Boston was clearly a large issue that needed to be and is still not fully resolved. However, busing students across neighborhoods in a disorganized manner was far from the solution. It is hard to say that there was a clear solution that would desegregate Boston smoothly, but the conflict that arose from busing ended up working against the original goal. Desegregation was a worthy goal and still is. As long as there is segregation in the city, certain neighborhoods and communities will never receive equal access to resources and opportunities as their counterparts.

I think that change had to happen in public schools, but I believe that it needed to undergo a different process than what Judge Garrity utilized, over a more gradual period of time, to reduce conflict. Busing was too sudden for many white families to tolerate, and boycotts immediately halted the effectiveness of the plan and intensified feelings of white superiority over blacks. I think that a more viable plan would be to first significantly improve the schools that black students were attending, and then after the education has leveled out, to start a more organized system of mobilizing students from one school to another.

After seeing video footage and reading about the environment I can imagine how going to school may have felt during that time. I would have had an extremely hard time tolerating the violence and racist remarks and probably would have had trouble focusing on the importance of going to school and desegregating the schools. I think I would have been able to tolerate some verbal abuse but tolerating violence is a much harder task. It’s very impressive how the black students were able to keep their composure while going through those crowds of malicious white people.

I think the most visible effects today of the desegregation era is the segregation of public schools. After this era, many white families moved or transferred their children to private institutions and what was meant to desegregate schools really only seemed to add to a divide. In the article by Farah Stockman, a statistic is given that states that 48% of blacks do not believe that they will achieve racial equality in their lifetime, or ever, and that half of whites believe that equality has already been won. I think this is an extremely important piece of information to understand. Many white people are given the false notion that issues like segregation and even racism in general are way in the past, but by taking a more objective look at our societies and even by simply asking those that have personal experience when it comes to these issues, it becomes evident that none of these issues were ever truly resolved, that they all still exist in our present world simply labeled in new ways.

Snailaligator
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 10

Boston, race, redlining, and desegregation: What do we make of its legacy?

Originally posted by SillyGoblinMan178 on October 26, 2022 09:22

Desegregating the Boston Public School system is something that absolutely had to happen, but busing was far from the ideal way of handling it. The main problem with busing was how sudden the change was. Out of nowhere, hundreds of Boston children were now going to new schools in neighborhoods they may have never even been in, all because of a court order. Granted, this court order was extremely justified; for years, schools in historically black neighborhoods had been underfunded and understaffed, leading to black students having a noticeably worse education than white students. Something had to change, but busing didn't get to the root of the problem. Instead of just putting black students in better funded white schools, the city should have improved the conditions of black schools and tear down systemic housing barriers to make moving to other neighborhoods more feasible for black families. I think that most going to school during the 1974-1975 school year would have a lot of fear and anxiety about going to school, but only because of the riots. I don't think that most teenagers would care that much about integration after a week or so of school, although some could definitely be influenced by their parents if they have hateful ideologies. The most visible effect of the desegregation era of 1974-1975 is Boston's reputation as America's "most racist city." It took twenty years after Brown v. The Board of Education for us to start integration, and when we did there were riots all across the city.

I agree with the idea of first better funding black schools and tearing down housing barriers. The busing system clearly was not fully thought out before it was implemented.

autumnpeaches
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 10

Boston, race, redlining, and desegregation: What do we make of its legacy?

The ends of desegregating Boston public schools did justify the means of busing. I mean, look at us now, in at least every school we have some form of diversity. I know that busing created a lot of problems, including protests, fights, students dropping out, and even people getting evicted from their homes. However, we should blame this on the racist white people who didn’t want their kids to go to school with black people instead of blaming it on busing and desegregation itself. I admit, having your child go to a school outside of your neighborhood, especially a low-funded school, is not easy to swallow. Yet, this also brings light to the disparity between black schools and white schools, and instead of getting mad at the school system for “busing”, they should’ve focused on funding these schools as well.


That’s why I believe that desegregation was a worthy goal. It was obvious that schools that had the majority of black kids or kids of color were not properly funded and did not have the same level of education as white-majority schools. If we left it as it is fifty years ago, nothing would’ve changed. While it’s true that middle-class black people could’ve had a better education that’s on par with some white people, what about the other poor black children that couldn’t afford this? At the same time, it’s also not just black and white, Hispanic and Asian communities also had a hard time with busing, but not one of them had a major outrage as white people did. It all ties back to racism. In the end, it’s not “busing” or “desegregation” that burned down Robert Lewis Jr.’s house, it was his white friend, egged on by his other white classmates.


One solution that could’ve remedied this whole situation was providing funding for the schools in black neighborhoods. Most white parents were angry because they did not want their children to be in schools that were “bad”, so the best solution was to make these schools “better”. I also think they should have done better to address the racism. The North has been known to be more “tolerant” and “open-minded” than the South for centuries, yet Boston is protesting desegregation. What happened to equality for all? There’s also that racist BPS Superintendent, Louise Day Hicks, whose sons went to a private school yet she thinks she has an opinion on public schools. Public school literally meant “for the public”, aka anyone can attend, so why is she trying to bar black children from attending white public schools? They definitely should’ve diminished her power by some means since she was the person who was riling up the majority of the white parents.


If I was in school in 1974-1975 and I got bused somewhere beyond my community, there’s an 80% chance that I would’ve experienced racism, assuming that I’m a grown-up kid that is. I think that middle schoolers/high schoolers experienced a lot more conflicts compared to elementary schoolers. In the essays written by 6th graders at the Holmes Elementary School, they mainly talked about the parties they had, the field trips they went on, and how they were excited for the next school year. On the other hand, high schoolers in South Boston were brawling with one another every single day, and black students even had to deal with the mob standing wait outside. This shows how racism is taught. Little kids didn’t care about the “race” of their new friends, they got along just fine. High schoolers, who were older, were affected by their parents’ mindsets. If I was a student in the desegregation era, I’d rather just be a kid, I can’t fight and I sure as hell can’t deal with racists throwing rocks at me.


The most visible effect of desegregation today would be the increase in diversity. For example, Boston Latin Academy. If we pulled up a chart of the student body now, it would be around 25% black, 25% white, 25% Asian, 25% Hispanic, and others. Boston Latin School is less diverse. I remember it was a majority white and Asian before 2022, but the diversity of today’s sixie class and 8th graders have gotten a lot better. If there was never desegregation and no busing, I’m willing to bet that BLS and BLA would’ve been at least 80% white today and 20% other. One reason that BLA is so much more diverse than BLS is because it’s located in Dorchester, a predominantly black/Hispanic community with some Asians living there too. On the other hand, BLS is very far from Dorchester and it’s closer to South Boston and Back Bay, which are predominantly white. However, we are making progress compared to the late 1900’s, and that’s all that matters.

SillyGoblinMan178
Brighton, MA, US
Posts: 10

Originally posted by Babybackribs on October 26, 2022 19:36

Desegregating the Boston Public schools system was necessary means to bringing about economic equality throughout Boston. However busing children to different parts of the city, was one of the worse ways the government could have handled it. The main problem with busing was that the state was divided on the whether or not it was necessary to provide lower income neighborhoods with the same level of education as other children from wealthier communities. With this in-cohesion, especially in the public school committee, came protest from the higher income neighborhoods who left like their rights were being taken away from them. Due to the fact that they were split, the governments only option was to rush out a bill granting black and colored students, the opportunity to go to school in area with good funding, and thus good education, like South Boston. It's hard to say whether or not Judge garrity had very many options because he does not control the wealth gaps in these neighborhoods, nor can he do anything to create new schools in Roxbury with good teachers and lots of supplies. The atmosphere and environment at these schools could have been very tense as there was a war between races going outside while students were trying to learn. I believe this intensity was also exemplified by the parents of the children, as most of us know we do tend to gravitate towards how are parents think and act because we were raised upon those principles. One the key visible affects of the desegregation era can be seen in the countries perception of Boston as the most racist towns in America. It also begins to pose the question of how the gentrification of neighborhoods like Forest hills, East Boston, and Back Bay will further segregate our city and lead to more desegregation efforts (new zip code system for exam schools).

I think it's awful how easily hateful ideology spread throughout Southie during this time, especially between parents and children.

FlyingCelestialDragon
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 7

The desegregation of Boston public schools did not justify busing. It was necessary for the desegregation of schools because of the negligence and unfairness of schools in the Black community. Overall desegregation of schools was a worthy goal since it opened a new pathway for Black children and their education. But the busing situation was not the best step for reinforcing the desegregation. The busing led to many more problems and created a larger barrier to desegregation. I think change did need to happen in the Boston Public Schools but it should not have started with busing first. Instead, I think the schools in the Black community should get funded with better materials and teachers. With this, these schools could be on somewhat the same level as the schools in the White community. Additionally, they should break down the housing barriers where one community would live in a specific area. If I went to school in the environment of 1974-1975, I don’t think my parents would let me go, since it would be too dangerous. I don’t think there would be anything tolerable about it. The most visible effect today of the desegregation era of 1974-1975 is that Boston is called America’s most racist city and no matter what we do now, the name won’t go away.

palmtreepuppy
Posts: 7

Boston, race, redlining, and desegregation: What do we make of its legacy?

Yes, the ends did justify the means in my eyes because Boston is a racist city and when busing was introduced it was very controversial but in the end, even though Boston isnt perfect, it helped to segregate our city and school. Although it could have gone smoother in some ways like not having the change be so drastic and holding more people accountable for their actions, having forced integration was one way about starting to address the segregation in our city. As said in the article “Did busing slow Boston’s desegregation?”, this is something that “we just try to forget”. Which seems to be true as we really only learn about the Boston busing issue with a hyper focus, not with the large topics. But as addressed in this article the negative “the backlash to busing looms even larger in the mind. It felt personal and unforgettable.

Of course desegregation was a worthy goal because the city was so divided and people felt alienated from one another due to the racism embedded in our cities history. Something that was interesting that I read in “Whitey Bulger, Boston Busing, and Southie’s Lost Generation”, was that when they went for Southies “power”, “the State Board of Education never considered [the realities]”, of the Neighborhood having its own division. But, to let segregation continue in the direction that it was headed would be pure ignorance.

Yes, change most certainly needed to happen in the BPS system given the extent of segregation and racism that was driving groups of people out of their homes due to violence and away from the schools that they deserved to be in because of fear instilled by parents and kids alike. I feel like there weren’t really any other solutions to this problem except for adequate funding to all schools in Boston to level the playing field but if that were to happen there would still be public outcry. And according to one black mother, as she recounted in “The Lasting Legacy of the Boston Busing Crisis”, “And so, then we decided that where there were a large number of white students, that’s where the care went. That’s where the books went. That’s where the money went”, when speaking about the funding given to the schools and the disparities it caused.

I certainly don’t think that going to school during the busing crisis because of the hostile environment that will have been created. I also think that it would be intolerable to feel like you would have to be so belligerent to new people coming into a school. In addition, when I sit at BLS I see a mix of all of the kids of Boston and to be sitting with kids that really only come from one area or background would be odd.

Some of the visible effects that are still here is the division of people into friend groups, neighborhoods and even the subgroups inside of neighborhoods and schools. Another effect is the disparity between the school funding and the education levels of those schools. We see the very clear racial split in certain neighborhoods as well as the certain types of stereotypes that are associated with them. We can als see it in our own school as we shifted away from the ISEE to a zip-code system to make the school more diverse. But, by using zip-codes to determine a person's chance of getting into this school it relates it back to the race of a person and ties their race to their neighborhood which seems almost counterintuitive.

Martha $tewart
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 8

Boston, race, redlining, and desegregation: What do we make of its legacy?

I think that the ends justified the means because desegregating education was a necessary step in making Boston the city it is today. In my opinion, Boston wouldn’t have changed with the decisions of just the local government. Boston is a very tight knit community, the racism of a few impacts the whole city. Though bussing created unnecessary violence and disrupted education for a time, many of the children remarked that they had their best school year in an integrated school. In WGBH's "Echoes of Boston's Busing Crisis", black students expressed that they were excited to share meals with their new friends and go on feild trips that would not have been available to them before.


Desegregation was definitely a worthy goal. During that time, black students made up a solid percentage of the student body, yet they had less opportunities and materials. Having black students go to white schools and white students go to black schools created an equal education opportunity as well as incentive for the government to provide adequate funding to underfunded schools. BLS is so diverse and interesting because of all the different types of students that come here. I think that bussing was a short term solution to a bigger problem. Though it did help in equalizing education, it displaced families and strongly affected those who were too poor to move. Like SillyGoblinMan178 said, Judge Garrity could have addressed the broader issues with funding and provided money or materials for those schools, or even focused on redlining issues to create affordable housing in all areas of Boston. I think an alternative solution should have been discussed, especially after families got threatened and firebombed.


Going to school during that time does not seem intolerable to me because I already utilize public transportation to get to school every day and I live far away. I also have always gone to schools where there are many races of students. However, I can imagine that it would have been an odd change for students who were used to being close to home. It would also probably have been much easier for me because I am white and those students going to Roxbury were generally treated better than those going to Southie.


I think that the most visible effects of the desegregation era are mixed, and depend on perspective. For example, the article “Did busing slow Boston’s desegregation” from the Boston Globe states that 48% of black people think equality can never be achieved and half of whites believe it already has been. Busing might have given people the false idea that it “fixed” Boston and that we are no longer racist. I think those ideas are still here, but hidden. BPS still doesn’t have as many students as it did before integration, BLS alone makes up 5% of all students. Many schools still have mainly black or white populations, most likely due to redlining and the neighborhood. But schools are definitely more diverse than before, hopefully this can create an environment where we can discuss these issues and work on making Boston a more safe, inclusive place.


the_rose_apple
Posts: 10

Although it should have happened years ago (even before Brown v. Board of Education), desegregation was the first step in creating a more just education system. Boston Public Schools and the school committee failed all the black students who lacked funding and proper education in their schools meanwhile the white students got all the opportunities, materials, and funding they needed to succeed. Busing was a good idea, but there was also a lack of security. Many students including Elerose Nelson (from the “Echoes of Boston’s Busing Crisis”) felt scared to take the busses to school because people would throw rocks, eggs, and other objects at the busses filled with innocent children that only wanted to learn. Bringing black students to schools in different (white) neighborhoods didn’t solve the issue of underfunding and disregard for the school in those black neighborhoods that were run-down and “cruddy.” (Mark Jawonski - “Echoes of Boston’s Busing Crisis”). BPS should have created a whole new plan where they put more funding into those schools, provided transportation, materials, and better teachers, and protected students and teacher from irrational rioter.

For me, it would have been intolerable to be betrayed by my friends and neighbors. In “How a Standoff Over Schools Changed the Country” Black Bostonians felt betrayed by their friends and neighbors, people who they knew for years and never had a problem with. After centuries of segregation, there was going to be some reaction towards desegregation and, unfortunately, the reaction ended up being violent towards children. The most visible effects of desegregation today can be seen by the difference (both in the diversity and rank) of schools across Boston. School that have or had a mostly white population have better schools, materials, funding, and opportunities for their students compared to schools in mostly black neighborhoods.

autumnpeaches
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 10

Originally posted by palmtreepuppy on October 27, 2022 17:09

Yes, the ends did justify the means in my eyes because Boston is a racist city and when busing was introduced it was very controversial but in the end, even though Boston isnt perfect, it helped to segregate our city and school. Although it could have gone smoother in some ways like not having the change be so drastic and holding more people accountable for their actions, having forced integration was one way about starting to address the segregation in our city. As said in the article “Did busing slow Boston’s desegregation?”, this is something that “we just try to forget”. Which seems to be true as we really only learn about the Boston busing issue with a hyper focus, not with the large topics. But as addressed in this article the negative “the backlash to busing looms even larger in the mind. It felt personal and unforgettable.

Of course desegregation was a worthy goal because the city was so divided and people felt alienated from one another due to the racism embedded in our cities history. Something that was interesting that I read in “Whitey Bulger, Boston Busing, and Southie’s Lost Generation”, was that when they went for Southies “power”, “the State Board of Education never considered [the realities]”, of the Neighborhood having its own division. But, to let segregation continue in the direction that it was headed would be pure ignorance.

Yes, change most certainly needed to happen in the BPS system given the extent of segregation and racism that was driving groups of people out of their homes due to violence and away from the schools that they deserved to be in because of fear instilled by parents and kids alike. I feel like there weren’t really any other solutions to this problem except for adequate funding to all schools in Boston to level the playing field but if that were to happen there would still be public outcry. And according to one black mother, as she recounted in “The Lasting Legacy of the Boston Busing Crisis”, “And so, then we decided that where there were a large number of white students, that’s where the care went. That’s where the books went. That’s where the money went”, when speaking about the funding given to the schools and the disparities it caused.

I certainly don’t think that going to school during the busing crisis because of the hostile environment that will have been created. I also think that it would be intolerable to feel like you would have to be so belligerent to new people coming into a school. In addition, when I sit at BLS I see a mix of all of the kids of Boston and to be sitting with kids that really only come from one area or background would be odd.

Some of the visible effects that are still here is the division of people into friend groups, neighborhoods and even the subgroups inside of neighborhoods and schools. Another effect is the disparity between the school funding and the education levels of those schools. We see the very clear racial split in certain neighborhoods as well as the certain types of stereotypes that are associated with them. We can als see it in our own school as we shifted away from the ISEE to a zip-code system to make the school more diverse. But, by using zip-codes to determine a person's chance of getting into this school it relates it back to the race of a person and ties their race to their neighborhood which seems almost counterintuitive.

I agree with what you said about how "forced integration" was one way to address segregation in our city. While it's true that some black kids were playing with white kids, it wasn't ALL like that. Most of those middle-class black kids lived in the same neighborhood as white kids and that's why they got along so well. However, in neighborhoods like Dorchester and Roxbury, segregation very much still exists. Busing didn't "slow down desegregation", it just showed people's true faces.

the_rose_apple
Posts: 10

Originally posted by palmtreepuppy on October 27, 2022 17:09

Yes, the ends did justify the means in my eyes because Boston is a racist city and when busing was introduced it was very controversial but in the end, even though Boston isnt perfect, it helped to segregate our city and school. Although it could have gone smoother in some ways like not having the change be so drastic and holding more people accountable for their actions, having forced integration was one way about starting to address the segregation in our city. As said in the article “Did busing slow Boston’s desegregation?”, this is something that “we just try to forget”. Which seems to be true as we really only learn about the Boston busing issue with a hyper focus, not with the large topics. But as addressed in this article the negative “the backlash to busing looms even larger in the mind. It felt personal and unforgettable.

Of course desegregation was a worthy goal because the city was so divided and people felt alienated from one another due to the racism embedded in our cities history. Something that was interesting that I read in “Whitey Bulger, Boston Busing, and Southie’s Lost Generation”, was that when they went for Southies “power”, “the State Board of Education never considered [the realities]”, of the Neighborhood having its own division. But, to let segregation continue in the direction that it was headed would be pure ignorance.

Yes, change most certainly needed to happen in the BPS system given the extent of segregation and racism that was driving groups of people out of their homes due to violence and away from the schools that they deserved to be in because of fear instilled by parents and kids alike. I feel like there weren’t really any other solutions to this problem except for adequate funding to all schools in Boston to level the playing field but if that were to happen there would still be public outcry. And according to one black mother, as she recounted in “The Lasting Legacy of the Boston Busing Crisis”, “And so, then we decided that where there were a large number of white students, that’s where the care went. That’s where the books went. That’s where the money went”, when speaking about the funding given to the schools and the disparities it caused.

I certainly don’t think that going to school during the busing crisis because of the hostile environment that will have been created. I also think that it would be intolerable to feel like you would have to be so belligerent to new people coming into a school. In addition, when I sit at BLS I see a mix of all of the kids of Boston and to be sitting with kids that really only come from one area or background would be odd.

Some of the visible effects that are still here is the division of people into friend groups, neighborhoods and even the subgroups inside of neighborhoods and schools. Another effect is the disparity between the school funding and the education levels of those schools. We see the very clear racial split in certain neighborhoods as well as the certain types of stereotypes that are associated with them. We can als see it in our own school as we shifted away from the ISEE to a zip-code system to make the school more diverse. But, by using zip-codes to determine a person's chance of getting into this school it relates it back to the race of a person and ties their race to their neighborhood which seems almost counterintuitive.

I agree, but some schools in Boston aren’t vey diverse. there are schools across the city that have a very large majority of one race and some very small minorities. Even BLS isn’t as diverse ad many say it is. There is still a large majority of white students in our school and little representation from minorities, especially non-black and non-hispanics. I also agree that busing was the first step to address the segregation in Boston.

johndoe
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 7

The ends most certainly did not justify the means. There was so much unnecessary violence and hate for the simple reason that they put busing into effect.

Desegregation was a very worthy goal. It is crucial to the well functioning of a community.

Change needed to happen. The levels of racism were completely intolerable, and seemingly nothing could fix it. However, this was not the way for schools to go about it. I could not tell you what the ideal solution may or may not be, but I know that this could've been handled in a better way than causing fear and terror into people's hearts.

I cannot imagine having to go into a such a hostile environment like that every single day. I think that almost nothing would be tolerable, and that I, even as a white male, would be on edge every time I stepped foot in the building. I think that the intolerable would have been the violence and the slurs, and I think that everything else would seem very minuscule in the moment.

I think the most visual effect is the amount of racial divide in BPS schools. We learned that after the busing incident, white children were being taken out of Boston public schooling to be put into private schools, and they never returned. This completely effects the racial divide we have in our school today, because many parents who go through private education also put their child into private education.

posts 1 - 15 of 37