posts 16 - 25 of 25
purpledog11
Posts: 7

Moving forward, I think we, as non-Indigenous people need to become more education about the Native American experience. This can be addressed in many different ways, like social media as NotaTRex mentions. However, this can also start much younger. Elementary students are simply taught the wrong stereotypes from way too early of an age. There should also be a change in the way we teach young people about certain topics in history that pertain to Native Americans, like the First Thanksgiving. To fully confront this history, we need to simply just learn it. There is no reason why we have to wait.

What Deb Haaland and many other states have been doing recently of removing offensive naming is one step in the correct way. To address these stereotype within society, we simply just need to start removing the traces of them. It’s not to say that removing something offensive from history is a complete strategy, since it is important to also address why the removal. Erasing the darkness of history doesn’t just justify a solution to those affects at all. Once again, to just address the misconceptions this means staying educated in today’s times. Whether that’s through social media posts of other forms of media, like newspapers, it’s important that society has a outlet to learn about what truly happened

I don’t think there is fully a solution to addess the genocide of the Native Americans. There really isn’t, because history is hisotry, and we can’t change what has already happened. Apologies are super important, but what purpose do they actually serve? Isn’t it just another form of performative activism? How do we truly say sorry the everlasting effect of the sterlization of Native American women when about 25% of them were affected? But it’s also about moving forward, and what we can do better in society. As I’ve iterated many times, it’s important to be educated, and to stay educated. Learning the ugly truth about Native American is what we are obligated to do as people living on their land. I also believe processes like renaming offensive names is important, as well as providing federal funding and giving back land are all amends we can make, however, it simply isn’t enough to acknowledge the past. Frankly, there isn’t one solution or any solution that can be enough to say “sorry”.

I think one of the main ways non-indigenous people can become allies ot Native peoples is to take to first step of understanding what parts of society are currently offensive to Native people and to abstain from performing these actions. We are surrounded by the stereotypes of Native people, and it’s only now in time that we are taking steps to remove these offense imagery and actions. This includes removing offensive imagery off grocery brands, and also offensive actions like the Tomohawk chop for the Atlanta Braves. One can argue a tradition is a tradition, or it’d be weird for something to be removed when it’s always been there, but Native Americans have been on this land longer than the colonists have, and we owe so much to how this nation has treated them. It’s not worthy just putting out a statement and not acknowledging the true history like the MLB commissioner did, standing up for the Braves instead. While this isn’t the only thing we could do, it’s certainly a step in the right direction. Furthermore, I think society just needs to simply learn what is cultural appropriation. It should be a simple topic, but the theme of white supremacy and the melting pot in this country have not made it easy for people to understand what is ok and what isn’t. I also think we can do more than just performative activism. Sure land acknowledgements might be a step in one way, but learning Native American culture and history is more significant. To allow Indigenous people people to be fully integrated into society we need to “normalize” and fully acknowledge their culture and who they are within our society, which is something we’ve ignored fro hundred of years. I think don’t there’s exactly a way to completely mend the harm that has been done in the past, but allowing Indigenous people to feel more welcome in society, and not viewing them as outcasts is of utmost importance.

autumn_
boston, massachusetts, US
Posts: 8

The First Step: Giving Native People a Voice

First of all, we need to give native people a real voice. We continuously talk over them and acknowledge the fact that we live on their stolen land, however we never present speeches from them in classes. We never read books by Native American authors. We don't even learn about their real culture in our history classes. We claim that young children are too naive to fully comprehend things like the trail of tears or the real story behind thanksgiving, however, we continue to spew ideas of violence to these children relating to other racial groups in home environments. The more we sugarcoat history, the more likely children are to grow up as people who don't believe or care about the real story behind this history. The only way to really confront that history is to…well confront it. We need to be straightforward about what native people have been put through, and emphasize how it's a real issue.


The best way to confront stereotypes about native people is to (1) get rid of all of the harmful logos presenting Native American stereotypes. As we discussed in class, Native American stereotypes are littered throughout our country. The innate dismissal of these logos proves that some people simply don’t want change, even if this change benefits others and doesn't put these people at any real disadvantage. (2) Stop reenacting the false narrative surrounding thanksgiving while simultaneously dressing up literal 5yr olds as native people. (3) Teach more about different Native American tribes and how all of their customs differ. I feel that it’s a common problem in our society where we put racial minorities into groups and erase the differences between their people. People from different ethnicities have different cultures, even if their skin color is the same. We need to stop throwing people into boxes based on the way they look. (4) Finally, we need to teach our youth not just about the real history of native peoples, but also inform them about where they are in modern society. Many believe that indigenous people all live on reservations while being aided by government funds, but as stated in “Native Americans are Recasting Views of Indigenous Life” by Tristan Ahtone, more than 70% of native people live in urban areas. Many logos and names of companies are derived from native peoples, although usually with a mocking undertone. Even with this fact, they're still erased from modern-day life. Where are our indigenous actors and authors and teachers? It’s obvious that they want to be heard, yet we continue to silence their voices. They’re among us every day, yet not given the right or opportunity to speak out at large.


In terms of Native American genocide, the first way to address it is to actually teach it… I cannot remember the last time I was taught accurately about what Native peoples face, especially at the height of colonial settlements. As someone who does my best to learn the truth behind history like this, I am still learning more every day about new disparities native people faced. For example, the article “The Little-Known History of the Forced Sterilization of Native American Women” by Erin Blackmore is just another example of medical experimentation on people of color. During the 60s and 70s, about one out of four native women were forcefully sterilized. This mutilation is still felt within native communities today.


I’ve already stated what I think should be done to make amends, like giving native people a voice and giving back land, but in actuality, no amount of reparations will ever amount to the amount of pain their population has faced. I truly believe that nothing we could ever do would repay them in full. All in all, I think the best way for non-indegenous people to become allies is to learn about their history, ask more questions, and seek more answers. Furthermore, It would be beneficial to look to Native American sources for this information and support local native American businesses. Native Americans have always been outspoken about what they've faced; it's time to listen to them.

plasticbottle123
Boston, Massachussetts, US
Posts: 8

Native People

As a society we need to start moving past our harmful and dehumanizing stereotypes of Native American people. Getting rid of sports team mascots that depict “Indians'' in a stereotypical way might be one solution, but sports teams are just agreeing to do that so they don’t look bad to the media and don’t get canceled. Collectively we need to go deeper than that and start remembering them as human beings who were on this land before us and not these mascots or things we can use for our consumerism society's pleasure.

“Twistory'' is a good way to put it. We can address this “Twistory'' by first teaching it the right way from the start. Everyone in the US learns about Native Americans in the same way, that the Pilgrims came to America and became friends with the native people and had a big feast together. When that isn't what happened. It may be harmful to tell kids that the Pilgrims killed them and took their land but there are ways we can teach it that make it so that they don’t look like best friends living happily ever after. Also regarding names and such this is a touchy subject. According to the last article, Deb Halland says that using Native names for things is offensive. Obviously we can’t speak for Native people but in places like Massachusetts literally the state name is named after Native tribes. All of the towns down to every street sign has some significance to Native people. They see it as offensive because Deb Halland said the continued use was an “embarrassing legacy of this country's colonialist and racist past,”(Bryan). Yes things like team names and racist depictions of Native people do that but not town and street names. The town and street names acknowledge that they were her first and that it was their land. Taking away or changing those names just takes away one more thing from them. When a child asks, “Why is our town named that?” and you say because that id the name of a Native tribe that lived here and we took their land, that is an important conversation to have with your child. If you take that away people will be even more oblivious than they already are about the topic.

The fact is they were conquered. Just like any civilization of the past there were people who lived there first, and a more advanced or stronger civilization comes along and conquers them. People like to compare the killing of the Native people as they just did it to do it but there’s more to it. The people who came here from Europe traveled into the sea on a mission to find unknown land. They didn’t know if there was any land to be found or if they were going to fall off the side of the Earth because they thought it was flat. Then they found the Americas and of course they wanted to take it over and the only way to do that at that time was massacring and killing the people originally on this land. In the “Invasion of America” article they talk about how it is easier to think of it as one of the genocides in European history which is n’t true at all. Their motivation was to create a dominant race, the Pilgrims motivation was to conquer the “new” land they found and make it theirs. Looking back on it today, yes we can apologize because we have morals and don’t always instantly revert to violence anymore most of the time. It was so long ago that things were different and finding land was a huge discovery and the first thing people wanted to do was claim it as their own. This downs’t justify the horrible acts done to Native people and the downhill road to discrimination it created for them, but it was an inevitable event. Whoever found the Americas first was going to eventually kill the native people and take over the land.

What we can do as a society to help and become allies with Native people is to finally treat them like humans and not as this group of people. We always refer to them as “Native people” and “Indians” when they are human beings just like all of us and we should treat them as such. If they want to continue to live on reservations and go on with their way of life we should respect that and not interfere. Some concrete actions we can make is to stop making the divide worse and treat them like anyone else because they are human too. Of course acknowledge the history behind them, but don’t let that define who they are.

Rileyy
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 9

The Effect of Settler Colonialism on Native Peoples

  1. What do we need to do, moving forward, to better understand the experience of Native Americans in this nation? How do we fully confront that history?

In order to better understand the experience of Native Americans in this nation we need to educate ourselves more; meaning individually and in schools. Listen to what Native American people are saying, listen to their problems, listen to the things that they find offensive, listen to what they say non-Native Americans can do to support, and actually do it. Schools need to teach accurate Native American history, not the whitewashed stories they teach in middle and high schools. We need to understand that they still have a very alive and vibrant culture, even though a lot of people forget about them until indigenous peoples day, when many people participate in performative activism, talk about them for about one or two days and then not again until the next year. The only way to fully confront the history is by listening to Native American voices, listening to their truths, enabling them to share their stories and the stories of their ancestors on big platforms, not allowing non native people to tell their stories and act as native people, where all they do is perpetuate false stereotypes.

  1. How do we address the stereotypes, misperceptions, the “twistory” that has been passed down among non-Native Americans about this population?

According to Tristan Athone, “non-natives, barely acknowledge [their] past or [their] present, ignoring [their] lives by focusing on dominant, negative stereotypes. We need to recognize that most of, if not all of our depictions of Native Americans are incorrect. For example, in the disney channel movie Pocahontas, the statue in front of Museum of Fine Arts, the racist and offensive images used to sell things like butter, toys, food, the names and images used for national sports teams. The first thing we can do is acknowledge their past, especially from elementary schools; stop the teaching that Columbus ``discovered” America, and that Native Americans and Pilgrims united on thanksgiving, and teach what actually happened. Stop ignoring their lives. Apologize and immediately change racist and offensive images,negative stereotypes and symbols used by sports teams, food brands, etc.


  1. How do we address the fact that Native peoples were murdered for who they are—the very definition of “genocide”? What apologies and amends do we need to make, if any?

First people have to stop being reluctant about using the word Genocide, “if you look at the UN definition of genocide, every single federal policy toward native people can come under that” (Ahtone). Genocide is the defined as “the deliberate killing of a large number of people from a particular nation or ethnic group with the aim of destroying that nation or group”. This is exactly what happened to Native people, the entire U.S.A is built on genocide, the killing of Native Americans through diseases and wars. The sterilization of Native American women even after laws were made to end it, “the abusive sterilizations continued. Between 1970 and 1976 alone, between 25 and 50 percent of Native American women were sterilized”. They did all this just so their race doesn’t grow, because they felt like they were less than human beings. I don’t think there is any apology that we can make to Native Americans to atone for the horrible things that have been done to their ancestors and. Some of the amends that we can start to make though are reparations, such as; free healthcare, giving back actual usable land, for all Native Americans regardless of their blood quantum result. Create laws that ban the use of offensive Native American imagery for advertisement in sports teams, for food, etc.


  1. How can non-indigenous folks become allies so that Native peoples become fully integrated members of society? What concrete actions can we take to move forward and build a nation with Native peoples?

Non- indegenous can become allies by educating ourselves about the true history of Native Americans, stop the performative activism, and only remembering that Native Americans exist on Indigenous peoples day. Speak up and out for them, attend protests, sign petitions etc. Some more actions we can take are, more accurate representation of Native people in our media, in our movies, in our governments, etc. Celebrate their culture, and try as much as possible to refer to them by the name they want to be called. In conclusion we need to amplify and uplift native voices, and actually listen to what they’re saying.

Barnacle
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 10


  1. What do we need to do, moving forward, to better understand the experience of Native Americans in this nation? How do we fully confront that history?

Things that we should do include educating kids and others more about not only the history, but also the culture and values of different Native American tribes in classes, listening to Native American voices to receive the respect that they deserve, and we should change history classes so that they are less Euro-centric. Something that was brought up in the “A Conversation With Native Americans on Race” video was that the government has used a blood quantum system to declare Native Americans “true” Native Americans, which is a system that is extremely divisive within their communities. Demolishing that system would unify Native Americans more, and help them foster their Native identity if they’ve been denied such a title. Giving Native Americans a more valid and accurate representation in the media is also important in better understanding the experience of Native Americans.

  1. How do we address the stereotypes, misperceptions, the “twistory” that has been passed down among non-Native Americans about this population?

We should address the stereotypes, misperceptions, and “white savior” history by first changing the way history is framed in textbooks. Textbooks should be less Euro-centric, and paint a wider picture of what America was really like by including Native Americans and other groups as much as they include white people. Another important thing that needs to be done is to continue the changing of derogatory names like Deb Haaland has helped do (from the article “Deb Haaland seeks to rid US of derogatory place names”), and to continue the stopping of using Native Americans as caricatures/mascots/logos, like the Cleveland Guardians did. Bringing to light the meaning behind derogatory words is also important, because it brings more understanding to why words hurt groups so much, such as the term “red-skin.” Until it was talked about in class, I had no idea that the term was so bad. It’s absolutely terrible and disturbing how all of these terms, images, and names are so accepted in American society. Especially the seal on the Massachusetts flag– it’s so freaking insane that that flag has been the Massachusetts flag for so long and no one has batted an eye until this year.

  1. How do we address the fact that Native peoples were murdered for who they are—the very definition of “genocide”? What apologies and amends do we need to make, if any?

The first thing that comes to mind for how to apologize and address the genocide that happened in America of Indigenous people is making memorials for those that have lost their lives. They were supposed to make a memorial on Deer Island, but for whatever reason, funding was never given to the artist to build the memorial. We should find a way to help fund for the memorial, or actually– why were they so willing to make a memorial for Irish people on their island, but not for Native Americans? This whole situation is so infuriating. Anyways, building memorials to commemorate those who have passed away is one way of addressing the genocide that has occurred on the land, and states should do some work too to help in the conservation of Native American culture for Native American foster kids. In the article “The Little-Known History of the Forced Sterilization of Native American Women,” there was an article linked to that that talked about 32 states not following the Indian Child Welfare Act. This act was supposed to make sure that Native American children maintained connection to their relatives/tribes, and if they needed help maintaining that, the state was supposed to do everything they could to keep those native families together. We should hold the government accountable for slacking on such an issue. Another thing that should be done is rewriting history that makes white people look like they “saved” Native Americans, when really they just brutally forced them to assimilate into their culture, wrongfully took their land through broken treaties, and even hunted them to earn cash and land (as mentioned in class). Spreading information about these tragedies is important to not dismissing the issues that affect Native Americans today. Something we could do as an apology is help protect the land that Native Americans still own, so that they don’t have to deal with any unwarranted ownership from companies or pollution. Talking about the current day affects of sterilization (from the "The Little-Known History of the Forced Sterilization of Native American Women" article) and genocide is also important to talk about.

  1. How can non-indigenous folks become allies so that Native peoples become fully integrated members of society? What concrete actions can we take to move forward and build a nation with Native peoples?

We can be allies to Native peoples by donating to charities and funds for memorials, protesting alongside Native Americans for their rights, and help spread awareness of any past or present wrongdoings done to the community. Respecting the traditions, culture, and their clothing in any setting (whether it be at work or at school or just in general really) is vital to making them feel accepted in the society we all live in. Calling Native Americans by their tribe names if they would like instead of just calling them “Native American/American Indian” is also a good idea.

Eisenhower34
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 10

Effect of Colonialism on Native Peoples

As a nation, we must not only strive to educate the masses about the heinous atrocities committed against the Native Americans, as well as the rampant injustices, harmful actions, and prejudicial actions done unto them, but we must also band together and take an ACTIVE role in eliminating these injustices. This can all be accomplished in an accelerated time frame if we also, simultaneously, seek to revert the severely polarized view our nation’s politics are scarred with. By cooperating both in the political sphere, and regarding our nation's tumults, we can better hope to act meaningful and impactful change against the problems we face. We should also be less dismissive of what our neighboring countries are doing to revert their own injustices. Canada, for instance, has done numerous things to acknowledge and actively revert the harmful policies regarding treatment and the civil rights of their Native American population. But by far the best way to understand the experiences of Native Americans is to make them involved in the process and, on a more individual level, to personally educate oneself about their perspectives and their thoughts and recommended actions regarding this reformation.


As previously stated, the best way to address harmful “twistory” present in our nation and society, is to become educated of their history and to seek to be more personally knowledgeable of them. This can only work on a nationwide level. As a whole we must ALL seek to become more aware and knowledgeable about ALL marginalized peoples and populations. Another valuable, and often overlooked, method to address the misinformation present in our society is through the media. “Small in number with limited power at the polls, they have not led the national news since 1972-73, when the American Indian Movement took over the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the FBI laid siege to Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge Reservation.” (Saunt ¶ 4) Not only do we have to represent more minorities and let their voices be heard through the media we encounter, but we also have to make meaningful and lasting reparations and changes to past harmful media, and current harmful media. This includes images portrayed in sports uniforms to social media posts and harmful and corrupting chat room messages. We have to work on making a more inclusive and open society, as well as fostering the true backstory of the native population.


“In the Great Plains, the US Army conducted a war of attrition, with success measured in the quantity of tipis burned, food supplies destroyed, and horse herds slaughtered. The result was a series of massacres: the Bear River Massacre in southern Idaho (1863), the Sand Creek Massacre in eastern Colorado (1864), the Washita Massacre in western Oklahoma (1868), and a host of others… In the mid-19th century, Americans were still fighting to reduce, if not to eliminate, the continent’s original residents.” (Saunt ¶ 8) Native people’s history following the arrival of the Europeans in the mid 15th century is littered with barbaric atrocity and pervasive genocide. We, unified, as a nation have to all come to terms with this. Not only recognizing and comprehending the extent to which the native population of this continent were massacred, but also understanding that despite this, they still exist. “Today, over one per cent (3.8 million) of Americans identify as native, an increase that reflects not a substantive demographic shift but a newfound willingness and desire to identify as indigenous.” (Saunt ¶ 5) As more and more people start to acknowledge their Native American heritage, and with more and more people being educated about such injustices, AND as more and more people become aware of, and actively strive to eliminate, the political polarization faced in this nation, we can successfully drive out the harmful dogma pervasive in our nation, and become a stronger more unified nation, ready and willing to tackle larger problems and to build a better world, unified.


As non-indigenous Americans, we as a nation need to foster our relationships with native Americans. This can be accomplished in numerous ways, and on many different levels. Some steps the common people as well as people of government can take to revert such harmful thinking are elegantly summed up by important CNN figurehead Van Jones. Whilst this isn’t the end-all-be-all solution, these are definitely valid steps which can guide our judgement and lay a foundation for how we go about repairing our divide as a nation.


1. We need to pay less attention to the politics at the top and more attention to the pain at the bottom. Common pain should lead to common purpose. Pick tough issues that neither party has been able to solve.

2. Some issues are still hot and divisive. State your differences on those issues – and then move onto areas where you can get something done. Separate battleground issues from common ground issues. You can fiercely oppose someone on a battleground issue and still work with them on a common ground issue.


3. Don’t try to make other people adopt your worldview just to work on a problem together. For instance, progressives working to fix the prison system are often motivated by empathy and a desire for racial justice. On the other hand, conservatives often want fiscal restraint, less government overreach, and second-chance redemption for fallen sinners. We have different reasons, but we want the same result. Don’t convert, Cooperate!


4. Respect that whoever you are working with on the other side has noble ideals and values. Start human, stay human. Don’t make them bear the cross for the misdeeds of the worst elements in their own party. They can’t control their yahoos any more than you can control yours. And when disagreements arise, don’t call people out based on your set of principles. If anything, try to call them up to a higher commitment — inviting them to better honor their own principles.

travelalarmclock
Posts: 9
  1. What do we need to do, moving forward, to better understand the experience of Native Americans in this nation? How do we fully confront that history?
  1. How do we address the stereotypes, misperceptions, the “twistory” that has been passed down among non-Native Americans about this population?

  1. How do we address the fact that Native peoples were murdered for who they are—the very definition of “genocide”? What apologies and amends do we need to make, if any?

  1. How can non-indigenous folks become allies so that Native peoples become fully integrated members of society? What concrete actions can we take to move forward and build a nation with Native peoples?

Everything learned about and discussed both in class and in these readings really changed my perspective. I think to better understand the experience of Native Americans in this nation moving forward, acknowledgment is the first step. But that is only scratching the surface. We can fully confront that history by facing what really happened following Columbus's encounter with the Natives, without any sugarcoating. We can educate people in textbooks and making their voices heard. I don't think we can completely understand their experiences, but we can try to better understand them by listening, willing to listen, willing to change.

There are a lot of stereotypes and misperceptions passed down about Native Americans [such as portraying them as "savages"]. We address them by shedding light on them, not ignoring them. It's important to change these stereotypes, like how the name of the Cleveland Indians was changed to the Cleveland Guardians. Even so, it's sad that it was only changed recently and that this "twistory" has been normalized for so long. I think it's important to be more inclusive of indigenous people. We were asked in class if any of us knew of indigenous people in Boston. I believe no one said they did. These stereotypes and misconceptions have been held onto for so long because their voices were muffled.

To address the fact that the Native peoples were murdered for who they are, we start by using the word "genocide". That word has been avoided to hide the very history of our land. We need to come to terms with the fact that it was genocide, and it wasn't anything less than genocide. We need to give back more to the Natives. The land they got back was only one percent of the land they used to own, before their encounter with Columbus. We need to apologize. Simple words are not nearly enough to make up for their experiences, but genuine apologies, acknowledgment from the nation, it's a start.

Non-indigenous folks can become allies by advocating for them, advocating for the Natives. To move forward and build a nation with the Native peoples, I think more people need to know about the history, the massacres, the forced sterilizations and assimilation. I did not know about any of that until a few days ago. More people need to hear their stories and the cultural appropriation has to stop as well. In class, it was mentioned that up until 2005 it was outlawed for openly indigineous people to live in Boston. That was not a long time ago. The laws that discriminate against indigenous peoples need to be rid of. I think there should be people who go through the city or state laws to make sure there aren't still laws like these. One of the articles I read [ "The Little-Known History of Forced Sterilization of Native American Women"] talked about how Native tribes are still being impacted by the past currently. In modern times, social services fail to place Native American children in foster care. There are modern child welfare laws in place, and this is not something that should still be happening.

Jane Lawrence, who documented the forced sterilization of Native American women in the 1960s and 1970s -- which again, wasn't really that long ago, if you think about it -- points out that the possibility of sterilization abuse is not all gone. The possibility still exists and that in itself is scary. There needs to be more regulations on injustices like these. There needs to be more activism for the Natives. The Natives should get more of their land back. There has to be more consideration and support for indigenous people.

monkeypox_area51
South Boston, Massachusetts , US
Posts: 6

The Effect of Settler Colonialism on Native People

  1. What do we need to do, moving forward, to better understand the experience of Native Americans in this nation? How do we fully confront that history?

Moving forward we can start to better understand the experiences and struggles of Native Americans. We need to begin to simply listen to their stories, and how they feel they have been treated in the past, recognize, and further learn from our mistakes. We can talk with those who are still affected by improper treatment by the government or citizens so we are able to understand and help them with their injustices. We cannot forget our horrific past history but we can focus on changing now and the future, by providing land for Native Peoples as they deserve.

  1. How do we address the stereotypes, misperceptions, the “twistory” that has been passed down among non-Native Americans about this population?

The best way to address the stereotypes and misperceptions of the Native Americans is by including them within our education system or having Native Peoples come in and teach the truth within schools. We as Americans have created these horrible stereotypes and it is our job to cleanse society of these harmful stereotypes.

  1. How do we address the fact that Native peoples were murdered for who they are—the very definition of “genocide”? What apologies and amends do we need to make, if any?

Our first fact of addressing such is acknowledging that it truly happened, the fact that European colonists committed such horrific acts and cannot take them back. After facing this acknowledgment of genocide we must realize the harm such attacks have done and further give reparations such as land for such horrid behavior. We cannot ignore the fact of these actions, or worse try to cover them up as we are responsible for the acknowledgment and fixing of our relationship with Native Americans. Our government at the very least replaces the land and resources of these indigenous peoples so they can rebuild their communities and culture.

  1. How can non-indigenous folks become allies so that Native peoples become fully integrated members of society? What concrete actions can we take to move forward and build a nation with Native peoples?

Non-indigenous folks are able to become allies with Native peoples and help them fully integrate into society by welcoming them and not discriminating against their native origins. Stereotypes must be dismantled so that the judgment of indigenous people within society decreases, making society more welcoming to expressing their native heritage. Integration of native peoples within powerful positions such as governmental positions may help us build a more integrated society, If we welcome those that are open about their heritage, giving Native voices a place to speak, indigenous people will feel more comfortable expressing themselves, allowing their recognized population to grow. We as a society and government must recognize all races and ethnicities as equal so that we may establish a universal sense of equality within our nation.

WindWanderer
Posts: 9

The Effects of Settler Colonialism

1. In order to understand the experience of the Native Americans thus far, we must listen to their stories. We cannot simply rely on what our higher powers are telling us, because unfortunately it has not proved to be reliable. We cannot isolate ourselves from the Native Americans either physically or mentally. While of course it doesn't mean we have to all live on the same lands in the same way, we cannot let ourselves become a "we" while leaving the Natives as simply a "them." We have to listen and learn from them as individuals and from them as a whole, while at the time respecting their vulnerability and pain. Hopefully we can learn from we've done and never do it again, and instead make things better for them. Unfortunately, a lot of damage that we've done is irreversible, such as the forced sterilization of Native women. This and many other things we cannot undo, but we can do everything in our power as individuals to avoid more atrocities going forwards. We can actively fight for them, let them know that they're supported, that we care.

2. Again, if people knew the impact their actions were having on the Native Americans, if they saw their real and raw stories directly from their mouths, untwisted by news stories or the government, then maybe they'd be able to see them for who they are. When we steal their voices we steal their value, and it gives us as a country no room to grow. And with no growth, there's not change, which only allows the misconceptions to spread. Jane Lawrence writes in her article about the forced sterilizations of Native women that "some of [the IHS doctors] did not believe that American Indian and other minority women had the intelligence to use other methods of birth control effectively and that there were already too many minority individuals causing problems in the nation." Had any of the doctors taken a look at them and their ways of life they might have thought differently and offered at least some push-back against what they were being asked to do. But they didn't. They kept themselves separate. It is our job to educate, listen, see the lives of others before spreading information on them. It's our job to think for ourselves and not take whatever rumors we hear as fact.

3. There's not much we can do to fix the genocide. As we've learned, children have been taken away, people have been murdered, people have been driven to suicide and substance abuse. The people we've lost cannot be brought back, and the trauma we've caused is never going to go away. We need to address these events as they happened, we cannot cover it up. To know a history but not share it is nothing but ignorance. No apology or declaration will fix the trauma. Instead of no longer killing them, we can nurture their culture. We can give them room to thrive and find themselves again after being held down for so long. Fortunately, "today, over one per cent (3.8 million) of Americans identify as native, an increase that reflects not a substantive demographic shift but a newfound willingness and desire to identify as indigenous"(Saut p5). It would do everyone some good if we kept encouraging this growth, and allowing them to heal themselves.

4. We can become allies with the Native Americans by being friendly to them, respectful to their land, and appreciative of their culture. We can "integrate" them into society by not alienating them. They've not been seen as people in the past, so we need to see them as such and more. To build a nation that is functional again, we have to protect them. From those who seek to harm them, from rumors and propaganda, and our own judgements.

Eve
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 2

The Effect of Settler Colonialism on Native Peoples

  1. What do we need to do, moving forward, to better understand the experience of Native Americans in this nation? How do we fully confront that history?
    1. In order to better understand the experience of the Native Americans in this nation we must both be taught the history of the numerous atrocities committed against the Native Americans for which American colonizers take the blame and to actually acknowledge the existence of the remaining tribes that still exist despite constantly being under threat by oil companies, encroaching land realtors, and rapidly expanding cities. By actually acknowledging the existence of the tribes and not requiring that someone must prove their heritage in order to be considered what they identify themselves as through a blood test.
  1. How do we address the stereotypes, misperceptions, the “twistory” that has been passed down among non-Native Americans about this population?
    1. First of all, we seriously have to stop using supposed “Native American caricatures” that are racist as hell and literally depict the most stereotypical person while still somehow being socially acceptable despite the fact that if this were to have happened to any other race it would have been completely shut down. Like the fact that these caricatures made it into national sports and celebrations like the “tomahawk chop” being performed by hundreds of people is outright disrespectful and deplorable.
  1. How do we address the fact that Native peoples were murdered for who they are—the very definition of “genocide”? What apologies and amends do we need to make, if any?
    1. The methods that could be taken to address the fact that Natives were murdered and had their corpses mutilated could include teaching it or simply actually addressing it instead of just leaving it in the footnotes of history. We do need to make apologies and amend for what had happened and still is happening to them as even though they are Natives that doesn’t suddenly make them any less human than they already are, they are entitled to the same rights and liberties as we all are. An example of something that we could do could probably start with being the transferring of land back to the Natives instead of forcing them into reservations that are limited in size and lack fundamental resources that we all take for granted.
  1. How can non-indigenous folks become allies so that Native peoples become fully integrated members of society? What concrete actions can we take to move forward and build a nation with Native peoples?
    1. Stop holding on to these stereotypes that constantly make Natives seem as a primitive people when they are literally humans like us. It shouldn’t be that difficult to not treat other people like actual garbage but for some reason that tends to be difficult when it comes to the history of humanity. If you want to build a nation with Native peoples then one should probably start with ensuring that they are on an equal footing with the rest of the United States and not as the equivalent of a prisoner trapped in a cage built from their own resources by the thieves who stole it.
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