posts 16 - 30 of 31
hisoka
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 23

Originally posted by turtle17 on January 09, 2022 18:39

Asian Americans are seen as the ‘model minority group’, but the thing is, this isn’t true for all Asian Americans at all. First off, East Asians are who are subject to the stereotypes of growing up to become doctors or lawyers, and being extremely intelligent. But Southeast Asians are seen as illiterate, and unintelligent, and these are themes that are widely shown in media, whether it is making fun of an accent, a dish, or many other cultural things. Pacific Islanders and Native Americans are barely even talked about at all, there is a refusal to talk about the discrimination and prejudice they face. But the thing is, these are several different cultures, and these cultures are used to the advantage of white people, for when white people want to seem smarter, or when they want to seem better than.

In the I am not a virus article, the artist Lisa Wool-Rim Sjöblom talks about the images she creates regarding the racism against East Asians, specifically the racism following COVID-19. She illustrates both phrases and real life experiences to show people about what East Asians have gone through, a specific one being where a Singaporean girl was asked to leave a French tram by a white woman, because the woman didn’t want to catch covid from her. In the Time article, 'I will not stand silent', a similar story is told. A Chinese American nurse named Justin Tsui was racially harassed on a train platform, and was told to go back to his country. Tsui was scared for his life, when the man harassing him was coming closer and closer, further backing him on the platform, and was nervous to get off the train, in fear that the man would follow him home. The Teen Vogue article tells the statistic that the organization Stop AAPI Hate recorded 2,583 racial hate incidents from March 19, 2020, to August 5, 2020, and that 14% of these attacks were committed against someone under the age of 20 years old. The NBC news article also tells that with the rise of hate crimes against AAPI, has come a further rise of stereotypes, and not just ones committed against Asians, but also statements saying that Black people are the majority of those who have been attacking elder Asian Americans. People are taking a traumatic reality of AAPI, and twisting it, to further demonize other racial groups

Recently in class we have been talking about the US history textbook used for both AP US History as well as US History 2, and how inaccurate it tells of American history. In the Washington Post article, it mentions in contrast to the refusal to tell the accurate history of the treatment of Black people in America, “Asian American history is often footnoted or compartmentalized, recounted and analyzed as a subplot to the bigger narrative.” The scapegoating of Asian Americans article mentions that in the few times the trauma of Asian Americans is mentioned in a history textbook, its only in the circumstance of them being put in the place of blame, like the interment camps during WWII, and now, AAPI are the scapegoats again for Covid. People always need someone to blame.


One of the original questions of the post is: what should non-Asians do to be allies in response to what these articles and clips chronicle? This isn’t an easy question, and like how Tsui said in the Time Article, change won’t happen overnight. But I do disagree with Tsui on one thing, I personally believe that if non-Asians start doing their own research, there will be a gradual improvement, people need to realize that racism against AAPI is not new, it is something that has been going on for centuries and centuries.


My question is what do you think is the reason for this loss of humanity? What do you believe allows people it is acceptable to assault a person of any age simply became of racial prejudice?

It IS because of racial prejudice and feeling of superiority. The loss of humanity is because people will ALWAYS put themselves first and they will do whatever it takes to do that.

dinonuggets
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 27

Originally posted by flowerpower on January 09, 2022 15:58

This history of racism against Asian and Asian American people goes back far before the Coronavirus. From the Chinese exclusion act in 1882 to the newer Covid inspired Xenophobia anti-asian behavior has always been a part of american history. Members of the AAPI community are more and more often being treated like the “other”, and non-asian Americans are quick to blame them for whatever is going wrong in the US. We know that covid-19 does not discriminate and Asian people are not more likely to have or contract covid than any other race, but they are still being discriminated against because of non-Asian Americans' fear and bigotry. In a video from CBS on hate incidents against Asian Americans they talked about how businesses have been receiving less and less customers and how other AAPI community members have been bullied and attacked, simply because of the way they look. Another aspect behind the hate we’ve seen is politics, in a quote from a Berkley News article we learn that “China is increasingly perceived as the primary threat to America’s global dominance, and with economic and political tensions continuing to rise between the United States and China, Chinese Americans and other Asian Americans may be scapegoated for things other than the coronavirus.” This goes back in history as well to when Japanese automakers were coming to the US and growing successful, non-asian Americans became resentful and blamed Asian Americans for taking away from American automakers business. An article from the human rights watch reminds us that some political leaders like Donald Trump have even promoted stereotypes and hate towards Chinese and all asian people “by using anti-Chinese rhetoric.” Allowing this hate to occur within our melting pot of a country is unacceptable.

Recognizing these behaviors and biases against the AAPI community is important, especially educating and opening peoples eyes to them. In an article by the Times they explained one plan to combat it would be working with the Black community to fight all forms of racism. We know that the racism Black Americans face has generally been more in the open than that of Asian Americans but as we experience the racial reckoning of the Black Lives Matter movement the Times article advises that racism towards both groups be fought against together. While the Washington Post acknowledges the differences between the groups and the different forms of and reasons for the treatment they have faced, their article agrees that “Asian American and Black history share something crucial: the burden of stereotype and scapegoating for the nation’s ills” and “Until we understand the ways in which the Asian American story is in many ways like the African American story, we won’t be able to reckon with tragedies like Atlanta.” Non-Asian Americans need to learn about this hate and why it occurs, and we need to fight biases in ourselves and other people close to us. Also to remember that it is not Asian peoples responsibility to convince anyone they deserve to be treated with respect. Non-Asian people need to fight for respect for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and their rights.

So what are the best/most efficient ways to actually measurably combat this hate and allow AAPI to live with peace and respect in America? I recognize it’s easy for us to say we should “fight against the hate” but what does that mean and look like in a literal sense?


In response to the question, the first thing I think of is making a difference in schools. Teachers should receive anti-racism training and students should be given the opportunity to lead workshops about these issues. I remember the Stop AAPI Hate and Anti-Blackness in Asian communities workshops led by BLS A.S.I.A. and they were extremely informative. Attending these types of workshops should be mandatory for all students.

freud
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 28

Within the context of American history, I’ve learned so little about Asian-Americans or about their discrimination. Maybe there were lessons on it, but never enough that the information actually stuck in my brain. I didn’t recognize the names or events mentioned in these articles.

Liz Mineo’s “The Scapegoating of Asian Americans,” outlined the history of anti-Asian discrimination in the US. She mentions the Chinese Massacre of 1871, an instance of extreme violence that eventually resulted in the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This massacre was also mentioned by Michael Eric Dyson in his, “Why don’t we treat Asian American history the way we treat Black history?” I’d never heard of this happening. This was not a piece of history that any school curriculum had deemed important enough to include.

Furthermore, the horrific death of Vincent Chin was a piece of American history that I didn’t know, and I wonder if my parents would even know. When these names and events are mentioned, their black counterparts are often added in comparison. I’ve learned about Malcolm X, but not Yuri Kochiyama? The woman who cradled his head as he died?

Racism against Asian-Americans in its extremes is not something that is recognized. Jay Caspian Kang in “The Myth of the Asian American Identity,” talks about how when racism against Asian-Americans is recognized it’s always in regard to assimilation to whiteness. For example, one of the most recognized acts of Asian discrimination is the lack of representation in the film industry. Kang frames this as already privileged people demanding access to, “one of the few,” industries that denies them. He also brings up how a shared experience of racism for wealthy Asian-Americans is being mistaken for a delivery or service person. They’re race holds them back from receiving the class privilege they hold.

Kang points out that the assimilated Asian-American wants, “to become as white as white will allow.” This focus on assimilation to whiteness allows the average white American to be blind to more extreme instances of racism against Asian-Americans. Lisa Wool-Rim Sjöblom points out in Stephane Garcia’s, “I am not a virus,” that, “for a lot of white people, in order for them to understand racist attacks, you basically have to be punched in the face and to show a bruise.”

Since there isn’t mandated education on the history of discrimination against Asian-Americans, people don’t make the connection. With the Black struggle in America, the timeline is easy to see. They are somewhat unified by their struggle, and it’s easy to see the connection between past racism and current racism. However, America is home to 20 million Asian-Americans from more than 20 different countries. There is no unified identity, even if the term “Asian-American” tries to create one, so white America doesn’t see the unified struggle.

The inability to see this struggle as historical and real prompts the lack of understanding and lack of action surrounding modern racism against Asian-Americans. Human Rights Watch’s, “Covid 19 fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide,” talks about the countless incidents of government officials’ racist remarks. From President Trump calling it the “Chinese Virus” to an Italian governor saying that Italians have a, “culturally strong attention to hygiene, washing hands, taking showers, whereas [they] have all seen the Chinese eating mice alive,” it’s evident that this discrimination is very real. Yet, why do people not see the connection with those comments and the staggering increase in violent attacks against Asians around the world? People, not even from China, are told to go back there, that they are dog eating immigrants that are destroying the country. From CBS News: “"Take your disease that's ruining our country and go home,” and, “"Go back to China, F---- you, Chinaman" And still, the FBI has not done anything specific to combat the seemingly endless stream of hate.

We’re not taught the history, and in turn, many don’t see how real the racism is. Non-asians need first and foremost to educate themselves on the history of Asian discrimination and connect that to what we see today. Seeing the connections is incredibly important. Additionally, we need to ensure that we’re not seeing Asian-Americans as a monolith. There are so many communities and identities within the AAPI umbrella and that must be recognized, yet at the same time, we must understand how the same stereotypes are pushed on people that are not even connected by ethnicity. Asian-Americans have the same stereotypes pushed on them, but at the same time don't have their similar racist experiences recognized.


Question: What does it mean to be Asian-American? What are the pros and cons of this identifier?

freud
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 28

Originally posted by dinonuggets on January 09, 2022 19:47


Question: What can schools and school committees do to mitigate anti-Asian racism, whether that be microaggressions or other forms of bullying?

I think within schools education is always the first answer. Last year I went to an informational and discussion based event done by BLS ASIA about the rise in anti-AAPI discrimination and I participated in some important dialogue that should be shared or at least heard by more of BLS. This was an optional event, and the issue with optional events like these is that the people that need to attend, the ones that would participate in these types of discrimination, often don't. So, I think making an event like this mandatory would be one of the best ways to prevent microaggressions. I think some white people need to know what acitons of their are microaggressions, especially at BLS.

runningdog96
Posts: 18

Xenophobia and Hate Crimes in the Era of COVID

Throughout history, and in present day, Asian Americans have been and are “othered” - they are seen as something else when convenient, and as assimilated when convenient. They have also been continually discriminated against, and stereotyped as barbaric, less than human, or as a sort of illness to society, as we discussed in class this past week. Acts such as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which prohibited the immigration of Chinese workers to the United States, and programs such as the Japanese Internment Camps during WWII have contributed to the notion that those of Asian-American descent are “other”. In present day, with the surge of COVID-19 and its supposed origin in China, this sentiment has increased. Throughout each of the articles I read, there was a common theme of those of Asian descent experiencing increased violence against them. One testimony particularly struck me, stating that “It’s demeaning to see fellow Americans ridiculing, harassing, and abusing other Asian Americans”. This was the testimony of a 16-year old, and incorporated into a Teen Vogue article. It struck me because the person stated “fellow Americans” - they believed themself to be an American, and why shouldn’t they? The point to be made is that others don’t. Asian American people are seen as foreigners, or others, and heavily discriminated against. However, much of this discrimination goes unnoticed, because as a Washington Post article states, “Asian Americans were not wiped out, like Native Americans, under the marauding imperatives of empire. A Civil War was not waged over their previous condition of servitude”. That is not to minimize the pain that the Asian American community has felt, but more to emphasize that because there was no one major event that the American government can apologize for and attempt to rectify, much of the pain of the Asian American community has been erased or downplayed, and many acts are still being committed against them. For example, a UC Berkeley article states that in 2018, an act was passed to restrict Chinese immigration to the US so that students may attend school here.


However, many groups are working to rectify this, and conduct research on the increased anti-Asian hate that has occurred with COVID. This includes multiple research teams from Harvard launching the AAPI COVID-19 Project- backed by UNESCO- in order to research the impact this virus has had on these communities. Many other groups of Asian Americans have come together to launch funds and project similar, with the goal to protect the Asian-American community. Non-Asians should first and foremost be working to try to learn what this community has gone through. Only through reading these articles did I learn that Asians were targeted by the KKK, and that there are still laws in place to prevent people from immigrating to the US. Therefore, we should be working to educate ourselves, as well as funding these types of projects and founding them ourselves. We should be working on education campaigns, and listening to the Asian American voices.


To answer @dinonuggets ’s question of what can schools and communities do to mitigate anti-Asian racism, my answer is similar to the above one. School communities should be working to educate themselves on anti-Asian racism, and then be working to implement education programs to help others learn and to deconstruct many stereotypes surrounding the Asian American community, such as the model minority myth. We should also be classifying Asian American as non-white, as they are not white and should not be grouped in with others because this heavily contributes to erasure.


Question: How can we change our history curriculum to be more inclusive to Asian-American stories and to deconstruct the stereotypes within this community?


dancingsnail
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 23

Anti Asian discrimination in the age of COVID 21-22


Over the pandemic, Asian Americans have done an incredible amount of work tracking the rise in hate crimes and advocating for their communities. For example, Rick Lee is creating music to raise awareness for Asian American hate crimes, Russel Jeung is helping collect data and stories of Asian Americans who have been victims of racist attacks, the Asain Pacific Policy and Planning Council and the Chinese for Affirmative Action group launched a hate incident reporting website, advocacy groups appealed to Governer Gavin Newsom (CA) to launch a state racial bias task force to assist state and federal agencies in enforcing anti-discrimination/civil rights laws, and people like Felix Sithivong are sharing the stories of their lives and educating the nation on Asain American history and are advocating for their people. It is clear from the advocacy of these groups and these people that Asian Americans can not be defined as white by anyone. They have been oppressed by the same institutions that oppress other people of color, the pandemic just forced people to face their ignorance surrounding Asain American oppression. Asain Americans are people of color that differ in culture, ethnicity, and nationality that are too easily generalized into one group when it comes to being the target of hate or even the subject of any sort of mention in American society.

This ignorance and hate aren’t isolated to the US, but there is a common rhetoric being used around the world to use Asian Americans, particularly Chinese Americans as scapegoats for the virus. Government officials across the world are directly and indirectly encouraging hate crimes and racism, using their rhetoric to advance anti-immigrant and white supremacist agendas. Part of being an ally is being able to see past this rhetoric for what it truly is, racism. As Micheal Eric Dyson explained in his article Asain American history is often overlooked or undermined, not seen as something that made America what it is today. If something isn’t considered fundamentally American (as Black history often is) then most Americans aren’t aware of it. Trump was able to get away with calling COVID-19 the “China Virus” or “Wuhan Virus” (to some extent) because Asain American history isn’t considered fundamentally American, meaning this casual racism might not be taken as seriously. In addition to this Donald Trump, and other world leaders like him never directed any response towards respecting and protecting Asian Americans, allowing their followers to let their hate fester into violence and verbal abuse. In Italy the Governor of Verano said Italians have a “culturally strong attention to hygiene, washing hands, taking showers, whereas we have all seen the Chinese eating mice alive,” Brazilian government officials tweeted the virus was a plot for world domination, in the UK and Australia Asain people have faced much of the same violence and abuse they have in the US. Asain people across the world are becoming scapegoats for the virus, allowing governments to justify their discriminatory practices. For example Malaysia carried out mass raids to detain refugees and migrant workers, blaming the Rohingya refugees for COVID and in India, Muslims received the blame for the virus, allowing the government to fuel anti-Muslim hate that has been around for decades. Horrifyingly in Russia, Chinese passengers on public transportation are being reported to the police, raided on and Chinese people are prevented from entering the country at all.

The virus may have originated in China, but science proves that Asain people, let alone Chinese people, aren’t any more likely to carry the virus or spread it. This is a well known fact, yet it is one people seem to ignore, in favor of letting their hatred continue. This is an example of “them” vs “us” which is what allows discrimination to continue and what exacerbates it during times of crisis. People are fighting the people, not the disease. Russel Jeung (from the AAPI Hate Reporting Center) is afraid that as there are more stay in place policies, hatred will continue to increase. He urges Asain Americans to report incidents of racism, since once it is documented people will be able to see the “pervasive community issue.” Particularly important to fighting this discrimination is understandin gthe discriminatry American Public Health system. Immigrants have often been targeted because of the threat their country poses to American dominance. This was particularly relevant in the 19th and 20th centuries and is continuing into this one. As China becomes greater competition to the United States, animosity increases towards Chinese American and Asain American citizens as they are seen as extensions of their “home country.” Today some Americans worry about the debate on trade, Chinese espionage, and the expansion of 5G (none of which most people understand). The threat of nations that threaten us is often overblown as the US finds a way to convince its citizens that it is the greatest country in the world and deserves the right to be that way, and it will do so at any cost. At Angel Island between 1910 and 1940 us where the stigma of Asain people carrying diseases was cemented. Asian immigrants on Angel Island were quarantined and forced into invasive medical procedures. Public health authorities misrepresented Asains as disease carriers of incurable afflictions, a falsehood that has clearly carried itself into the 21st century.

Foriegn competition isn’t the only thing that has created the “us” vs “them” narrative and the hatred entwined with fear. The model minority myth for years is what has kept the truth of Asain American history from the forefront of American culture. As Dyson explains, the model minority allowed people to use Asain American achievement as a metric to assess and criticize Black and Latino progress. It also forces a comparison to form between civil rights movements in the Black/Latino communities and the Asain community. Of course these comparisons are ridiculous and are formed with minimal information, but they are what have undermined Asain American history and allowed this model minority myth to continue. In fact what Asain American history, Black history, and Latino history all have in common is being “the burden of stereotype” and “scapegoating for the nation’s ills” (Dyson).

So far there doesn’t seem to be an end to the pandemic as schools are being ravaged by COVID-19 and we see the same patterns play out over and over again. This means that Asain Americans are still facing discrimination in relation to this virus. They’re experiencing more fear, anxiety, depression, and isolation. Economically, Asain American small businesses are struggling as people can’t seem to separate the people from the disease. As Asain American allies we can buy locally at Asain American businesses and do our part to prevent isolation. We can advocate for legislation to support small business loans for Asain American businesses that have taken a hit during the pandemic. This could come in the form of protests, starting petitions or starting small with our city councils and our mayors. Equally as important is learning Asain American history, knowing the people that have died in the name of civil rights, knowing the people like Vincent Chin that were murdered because of who they were. Asain American history needs to become as fundamentally American as any other groups’ history, as America wouldn’t be where it is today without them.


How do we see the model minority myth playing out at BLS? How does it affect other students of color and the Asain students that are subjected to this myth?









eac
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 21

Asians/Pacific Islanders and COVID: Xenophobia and Hate Crimes in the Era of COVID

I found it very interesting how the issue of increased racial violence due to COVID-19 was entirely global. There's the widespread perception that the US is by far the most racist country, and it very well may be, but focusing too much on American racism produces a tunnel vision effect and the public ignores issues in other countries. In particular I found the hate against Muslims in India and in Sri Lanka very interesting, as one would think that the COVID pandemic would lead to more hatred against east Asians. The Republic of India was formed out of the British holds on the continent, and while the heavily mismanaged partition of India and Pakistan made it seem like India was the Hindu balance to a Muslim Pakistan, both countries were relatively open to the other religion, especially India. And while India has remained a secular state, Pakistan delved into a hardline Islamist state, which has forever marred its relationship with many countries, most of all India. India and Pakistan have fought several wars between them, which certainly didn't help the already soured relations between the Hindus and Muslims in India. This relationship is barely known in the US, but what's even less known is the horrific and numerous race riots that have occurred in India. These race riots dwarf the largest US race riot, the Tulsa race massacre. The first of these occurred in 1946, one year before India's independence. Direct Action Day and the Noakhali riots have a shared casualty number of 6000, with several thousand more rapes and forced conversions. These race riots were an act by Muslims against Hindus, and this was one of the many factors that led to the decision being made of an independent Pakistan (despite the Noakhali riots taking place in what would soon be East Pakistan, now called Bangladesh). However, after the independence of India, more and more anti-Muslim and anti-Sikh riots occurred, the most notable being the largest race riot in history, the 1984 anti-Sikh riots (the official death toll is 3350, which is less that the Noakhali riots, but non-government estimates range from 8000 to 17000). These riots continue to this day, in 2020 widespread anti-Muslim riots in Delhi left over 50 dead and caused widespread damage to the community. None of this is talked about in the west.

That previous point went a bit off the rails, but it's important to note that riots are outside the norm when it comes to racism against Asians. The many other articles show how smaller, more personal incidents and attacks are the norm, especially the Time article. This racism has always existed in the US, ever since the first east Asian immigrants came to the west coast. However, this racism was intensified when Asians became legitimate economic challengers to the white workers, something that hadn't been seen from the other minorities in the US at the time. African Americans had always been held back economically, and the few times they were able to surpass whites (Greenwood and Wilmington) were decimated. This competition by Asian Americans was deemed too great of a threat, and this led to the Chinese Exclusion Act. Anti-Asian sentiment simmered down after the Japanese Concentration camps during World War 2, not because any of the problems were solved, but public attention turned to the Civil Rights movement, led by famous African American activists like MLK and Malcom X, while Asian Americans had no public figures that captured the same attention. Notice of the racial tensions against Asians went up slightly due to the 1992 LA riots, but the COVID pandemic brought these struggles to the limelight. I'd argue that anti-Asian hate didn't increase as significantly as some people might think, it was just the notice of this hate went up exponentially. COVID was used as the excuse many wanted to attempt to legitimize their hate. For the first time in US history, the general public became more aware of anti-Asian hate... and then George Floyd was murdered. Sadly, the BLM movement largely stole the public attention away from Asian-American struggles. The Washington Post puts it perfectly, that in the White-Black binary, there's little attention that can be devoted to the struggles by Asian Americans, especially since there's a perception that they are all economically successful and don't require the same kind of attention. Overall, I believe that COVID was never the source of Anti-Asian hate, that's simply an excuse. Instead, it exacerbated problems that already existed.

For the question, the writer for the Marshall Project article, Felix Sitthivong, was sentenced to 65 years in 2011. The reason? He gunned down another Asian American, Steven Sok, as the latter was walking with friends after celebrating a birthday party. Sok was killed, and another man was critically injured. Do you believe that this changes your perspective on his writing?

dancingsnail
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 23

Originally posted by runningdog96 on January 09, 2022 21:56

Throughout history, and in present day, Asian Americans have been and are “othered” - they are seen as something else when convenient, and as assimilated when convenient. They have also been continually discriminated against, and stereotyped as barbaric, less than human, or as a sort of illness to society, as we discussed in class this past week. Acts such as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which prohibited the immigration of Chinese workers to the United States, and programs such as the Japanese Internment Camps during WWII have contributed to the notion that those of Asian-American descent are “other”. In present day, with the surge of COVID-19 and its supposed origin in China, this sentiment has increased. Throughout each of the articles I read, there was a common theme of those of Asian descent experiencing increased violence against them. One testimony particularly struck me, stating that “It’s demeaning to see fellow Americans ridiculing, harassing, and abusing other Asian Americans”. This was the testimony of a 16-year old, and incorporated into a Teen Vogue article. It struck me because the person stated “fellow Americans” - they believed themself to be an American, and why shouldn’t they? The point to be made is that others don’t. Asian American people are seen as foreigners, or others, and heavily discriminated against. However, much of this discrimination goes unnoticed, because as a Washington Post article states, “Asian Americans were not wiped out, like Native Americans, under the marauding imperatives of empire. A Civil War was not waged over their previous condition of servitude”. That is not to minimize the pain that the Asian American community has felt, but more to emphasize that because there was no one major event that the American government can apologize for and attempt to rectify, much of the pain of the Asian American community has been erased or downplayed, and many acts are still being committed against them. For example, a UC Berkeley article states that in 2018, an act was passed to restrict Chinese immigration to the US so that students may attend school here.


However, many groups are working to rectify this, and conduct research on the increased anti-Asian hate that has occurred with COVID. This includes multiple research teams from Harvard launching the AAPI COVID-19 Project- backed by UNESCO- in order to research the impact this virus has had on these communities. Many other groups of Asian Americans have come together to launch funds and project similar, with the goal to protect the Asian-American community. Non-Asians should first and foremost be working to try to learn what this community has gone through. Only through reading these articles did I learn that Asians were targeted by the KKK, and that there are still laws in place to prevent people from immigrating to the US. Therefore, we should be working to educate ourselves, as well as funding these types of projects and founding them ourselves. We should be working on education campaigns, and listening to the Asian American voices.


To answer @dinonuggets ’s question of what can schools and communities do to mitigate anti-Asian racism, my answer is similar to the above one. School communities should be working to educate themselves on anti-Asian racism, and then be working to implement education programs to help others learn and to deconstruct many stereotypes surrounding the Asian American community, such as the model minority myth. We should also be classifying Asian American as non-white, as they are not white and should not be grouped in with others because this heavily contributes to erasure.


Question: How can we change our history curriculum to be more inclusive to Asian-American stories and to deconstruct the stereotypes within this community?


Right now we are learning the white man's history so, the first step would be getting rid of the textbooks we use to teach US History, I'm not sure if there are better textbooks that exist that are more inclusive to Asian-American history but it's worth at least looking. We have a decent population of Asian American students at our school and allowing people to speak about their personal experiences in class will be important to deconstruct stereotypes. For people that don't continue to take history in their final years at BLS they should also have the opportunity to learn more particularly during Asain American Heritage month in May, where BLS should focus on holding workshops and assemblies concerned with Asian American history. The librarians can also do more to advertise the literature they put out for different history months, and maybe English and History teachers could distribute book/media recommendations to their students. (Maybe these lists could be compiled by Asain American students/teachers).

eac
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 21

Originally posted by dancingsnail on January 09, 2022 23:03

How do we see the model minority myth playing out at BLS? How does it affect other students of color and the Asain students that are subjected to this myth?









The fact that Asian students constitute the second-highest percentage of the student population, and the fact that they are seen as highly successful academically, definitely plays into the model minority myth. This perception mirrors the perception the greater population of the country holds, that Asians are smarter and more successful, and that Latinos and African Americans could follow in their footsteps if they actually tried. This myth is also mirrored in BLS, as the other minority groups in the school are compared academically to the Asian students. I'm white, so I can't speak firsthand on the tensions this situation is causing, but I can't imagine that they're not there, at least to some extent.

Nightshade
Posts: 26

Due to the human tendency to find a source to blame for a problem that makes us feel powerless and out of control, AAPI-hate has increased over the past two years. According to FBI data, it’s risen by 73%. That doesn’t mean AAPI hate is new. According to “Coronavirus: Fear of Asians Rooted in Long American History of Prejudicial Policies”, U.S. policies have been the backbone of the discrimination of Asian peoples. The 1882 Exclusion Act was the first act officially excluding an entire ethnicity from entering the country. With parallels to many intrusive medical practices forced onto people of color throughout history, there were many immigration policies that were invasive and uninformed medical exams. On top of that, medical professionals told blatant lies about Chinese Americans carrying deadly diseases to justify the Exclusion Act. That article states, “Public health authorities, in turn, misrepresented Asians as diseased carriers of incurable afflictions, like smallpox and bubonic plague, as a means to justify anti-immigration policy and to drum up hysteria against Asian immigrants, who were perceived as a threat to white Americans for jobs.” This has striking parallels to current times, which can be easily displayed by artwork done by Sjoblom’s cartoons in the internet portfolio called “I Am Not A Virus”.It shows firsthand experiences of Asian folks being accused of carrying COVID-19, often accompanied by referencing Wuhan, China, the city the virus was officially reported to have started. This has been the reason why so many Asian people, often not Chinese, have been used as scapegoats and ostracized during the pandemic. According to “Coronavirus Has Sparked Another Epidemic in My Prison: Anti-Asian Racism” and Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide”, hateful speech surrounding the virus and China was consistently used by Trump while he was in office to refer to the virus, much like how the 1918 influenza pandemic was talked about. These are just a few examples of how hate has been spread, inciting fear in the lives of countless Asian people.

The discussion around race in the U.S. has typically been limited to Black and white, ignoring the numerous ethnicities and races that face discrimination every day, silencing their stories. The article, “Why Don’t We Treat Asian American History the Way We Treat Black History?” confronts this truth, stating, “The American racial conversation, in which African Americans are the default minority group, has impoverished our understanding of — and provided a poor platform for — the stories of others.” Until the indisputable displays of hate crimes against Asian communities these past two years, the racial conversation hadn’t been particularly open to discussing the in-depth nuances of discrimination in the U.S.

From creating art, articles, leading rallies, and using their platforms, Asians and Pacific Islanders across the world have stood up for their right to be treated as human beings, not a disease. Starting in France, the hashtag “I Am Not A Virus” began cascading around the globe. AAPI actors, such as Simu Liu, have opened up about their experiences and spoken out against the AAPI hate crimes perpetrated by people daily.

Non-Asians, on the other hand, have the responsibility to stand in solidarity with Asian people and Pacific Islanders and lift up their voices. Stand up for one another, and speak out when you see something that isn’t okay. It’s time to change the narrative.


How can we change our history curriculum to be more inclusive to Asian-American stories and to deconstruct the stereotypes within this community?

We need to be including Asian-American orators and change-makers throughout history. In our textbooks, they’re all around ignored. I also think that decentralizing our history curriculums to stop being strictly around the U.S. could make a huge difference in limiting xenophobia and ignorance.


How have so many people missed these historical continuities of racist and xenophobic scapegoating? Why do we keep allowing history to repeat itself?

etherealfrog
Boston, Massachusetts , US
Posts: 27

Asians/Pacific Islanders and COVID: Xenophobia and Hate Crimes in the Era of COVID

Throughout all the articles I read, one thing was clear: prejudice against Asians is nothing new, but the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated it greatly, not only in the US, but also all over the world. The article from the Harvard Gazette, “The Scapegoating of Asian Americasn”, points out that Asian Americans have often been used as a scapegoat in America, from the forced internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, to the murder of Vincent Chin during an economic recession, to the rise in anti-Asian hate crimes we’ve seen recently with the pandemic. The Human Rights Watch article cites numerous incidents of Asians and people of Asian descent in countries all over the world being called slurs and being attacked verbally and physically. Many of these incidents involve people blaming all Asians for the pandemic– using them as a scapegoat for everything going on, just as they have been used as scapegoats during so many other periods. However, as we know, the American education system is incredibly flawed, so these issues are often either ignored or only briefly touched on, so a lot of people in this country have very little understanding of the history of anti-Asian discrimination and xenophobia, and I would guess this is similar in many other countires.


The Teen Vogue article, “Anti-Asian Hate Has Surged During the Coronavirus Pandemic, Reports Find”, describes how the myth of Asians as the “model minority” was created for Chinese Americans, but it eventually grew to include many AAPI communities, and it was used to disprove America’s racism, while being a racist idea in and of itself. The idea of Asians being the “model minority” serves to supposedly make Asian-Americans seem “good” from a white prospective. When people don’t fit that narrative, they can be seen as “others”, even though, as Jay Caspian Kang talked about in his New York Times Magazine article, there is such a diversity among Asian Americans in socioeconomic status, geographic background, political affiliation, etc. It seems that when people do not completely assimilate to the point where white people feel comfortable, many white people become suspicious of them. As the prompt suggests, Asian-Americans being classed in the same way as white people only really applies to upper-class Asians from certain countries, and even then, it only applies when it benefits white people. A line in Kang’s article pointed out that America had so long been viewed in terms of only Black and white. Even though Asians are neither Black or white, the racial politics and inequalities still exist, so they are often classed with one or the other group depending on the situation.


From what I can tell, a lot of how AAPI people have confronted this is through spreading awareness and speaking out against this prejudice. Many people might still not know about these issues if it hadn’t been for the effort to make the experiences of Asians heard, such as through social media or through the Stop AAPI Hate campaign. The PBS News Hours article, “‘I Am Not A Virus.’ How This Artist is illustrating coronavirus-fueled racism”, is a great example of this. The artist, Lisa Wool-Rim Sjöblom, created a series of comics about how Asians, specifically East Asians, have been targeted by racism because of the COVID-19 pandemic. One thing I found interesting about her work is that the experiences with xenophobia against Asians she talked about were mainly in Sweden, which is not a country many Americans would associate with racism. It’s important to talk about racism and xenophobia everywhere, not just in the US.


From what I know. the most important things for non-Asians to do to be allies to the Asian community is to listen to and promote their experiences and voices, and to speak out against xenophobic prejudice and violence against Asians. I know this phrase is used so often, but educating ourselves is so important in order to be as aware as possible about what issues are affecting Asians as well as the history of xenophobia against Asians in the US and elsewhere. Another smaller thing non-Asians can do is to simply support Asian owned businesses, restaurants, etc. The CBS video (“2,120 Hate Incidents Against Asian Americans Reported During Coronavirus Pandemic”) talked about how the pandemic has been so hard on Asian owned businesses because of the fear of Asians spreading COVID-19.


Why has anti-Asian racism been so ignored before the pandemic? Why is it still not talked about as often as other issues of discrimmination?

Bumble Bee
Posts: 25

Hate is usually caused by one group not understanding and therefore fearing a different group. In the Berkeley News article, it talks about how Americans target Asian immigrants because of the perceived threats they pose to America’s dominance domestically and abroad. China is an economically prosperous country and competes with the U.S. Money is the driving force of power so it’s no surprise that the economy is a major reason for Americans’ bias against Asians. When Asian immigrants came to Angel island they were held in terrible conditions for days, weeks, or months. This was mainly due to the threat that Japan posed during World War 2. Covid isn;t the first time Asians have been pinned as disease carriers. The Berkely article said that “Public health authorities, in turn, misrepresented Asians as diseased carriers of incurable afflictions, like smallpox and bubonic plague, as a means to justify anti-immigration policy and to drum up hysteria against Asian immigrants, who were perceived as a threat to white Americans for jobs.”

In the Harvard Gazette Article, it mentions the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 which banned the immigration of Chinese laborers to the U.S. As the Berkeley Article put it, this discrimination wasn’t about the economics of the country, “but instead about preserving white American dominance.” Another similar act, the Page Exclusion Act of 1875, was America’s first restrictive immigration law, and it prohibited the entry of Chinese women because they were deemed to be “bringing in sexual deviancy.” Asian Ameircans regularly have been a scapegoat for U.S. issues.

Public figures can also influence hate. For example, the Harvard Article said, “A recent study found that former President Donald Trump’s description of COVID-19 as the “Chinese virus” led to a rise in anti-Asian hate online.” Similarly, after the Vietnam War, refugees from Southeast Asia faced routine discrimination and hate.

The Washington Past article talks about the effects of this discrimination and mass histeria. The article states, “Asian Ameircans have Los Angeles’s “Chinese Massacre,” a mass lynching in 1871 fueled by propaganda that Chinese Americans were “barbarians taking jobs away from whites”; the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882; Vietnamese commercial fishermen in Texas facing racist confrontations with the Ku Klux Klan in the late 1970s; six people gunned down at a Wisconsin Sikh temple in 2012.” The article points out that these tragedies aren’t as well known as the racism that African Ameircans face in this country. Without the proper acknowledgment of these tragedies, healing is hard, and part of the country's identity is being ignored.

The PBS article focuses on how an Asian artist, Sjöblom, has used art to express the racism faced by Asians during and before the Pandemic. In an interview with her, she said, “I find that a lot of things that I comment on, which are often seen as quite controversial, people tend to understand it better or show more empathy when they see my drawings.” She uses her talents as a mode of depression, communication, and education. As a parent, she says that she tries to combat the racism her children see and face by showing them good Asian role models and a variety of representation. Growing up in Sweden, Sjöblom faced lots of racism as one of the only Asian people around her. She said that she internalized racism and formed this kind of “yellow humor”. When she was older and had her own family they decided to move to Auckland so her kids wouldn’t have to experience as much racism as she did.

The Marshall Project article focuses on an Asian man serving out his sentence in prison. When Trump and other White House officials referred to covid as the “Chinese Virus” or “Kung Flu,” he felt like he did when he was a kid experiencing petty racist insults. Then he didn’t think that it was intentional. Now, he said, “I know that hate is not a mistake. It is an intentional action meant to lacerate, maim, mutilate, disable, debilitate, impair, and every other goddamn verb my thesaurus has for causing pain.” He tries to do his best to not be affected, but with the increase in Asian discrimination due to Covid, it has become harder.

In the NBC News article, it says that Anti-Asian hate crimes increased more than 73 percent in 2020. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders were the least likely to report hate incidents compared to other groups so this percentage could be even greater. The article says that, “The only way to bridge the data gap is for law enforcement agencies to adopt mandatory hate crime reporting.”

It seems that a big thing that non-Asians can do is become better educated on Asian American history and culture. Like I said in the beginning, hate is usually caused by fearing the unknown so this should help combat that. We can uplift Asian voices and strive for better representation. Representation will give Asian kids role models that look like them which can help build their confidence, like Sjöblom tried to do for her kids. It will also continue to dissolve divisions between the Asian and non-Asian communities. The Berkeley article put it nicely when it said, “But there is no them. There’s only us, and we have to figure out how to go forward where everybody belongs and nobody dominates. Not blacks, not whites, not Christians, not Muslims. No group dominates.”


The question I want to ask is how can you use your skill set, like Sjöblom used art, to combat racism towards Asians?

Bumble Bee
Posts: 25

Originally posted by etherealfrog on January 11, 2022 15:09

Why has anti-Asian racism been so ignored before the pandemic? Why is it still not talked about as often as other issues of discrimmination?

Racist jokes and stereotyping against Asians have become so normalized in this country that people tend to not realize that is an act of racism. The model minority myth has also contributed to rendering Asian discrimination invisible.

etherealfrog
Boston, Massachusetts , US
Posts: 27

Originally posted by Nightshade on January 10, 2022 02:04

How have so many people missed these historical continuities of racist and xenophobic scapegoating? Why do we keep allowing history to repeat itself?

I think the history of xenophobia against Asians has often been underreported and underrepresented in more modern history education— such as the US history textbooks we looked at in class. Social media also gives people the platform to directly share their experiences that might not have been heard before because there was no way to reach as many people with that information, which contributes to why there might be more attention to this history now.

Piper Clarke
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 5

Asians/Pacific Islanders and COVID: Xenophobia and Hate Crimes in the Era of COVID

Humans need someone to blame for situations such as these and when Covid-19 started to spread in China, they found someone to blame. White people, who already had underlinings of racism, started to blame, not just the Chinese, but all Asians for what was happening. They saw the harmful stereotypes that they came up for and that the media portrays and they blamed them. Media portrays Asians in harmful stereotypes. It portrays them in a bad light. In old Hollywood, they were seen as stupid, with heavy accents and usually used for a good laugh. Even in modern media, even if their roles have changed, you can still see the underlinings of racism. They are seen as the smart friend who’s a wiz at math. But this isn’t a new problem. Discrimintaion against Asians has been going on for much longer. An example is the Chinese Exclusion Act 1882. Many Chinese were detained and unable to enter the country due to unreasonable circumstances. People are unaware of these things because you don’t see it in history books. Unless something happens to Asians, like they get hate crimed in the middle of the street, they don’t show up in the news. It’s not discussed enough in classes either.
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