posts 1 - 15 of 27
freemanjud
Boston, US
Posts: 246


View: Charlottesville: Race and Terror (2017), a VICE video. (Run time: 22:04) A warning (TW): this video contains offensive language, references to violence and hate speech, and may well be upsetting and hurtful to many viewers.


Charlottesville and the events there on a weekend in August 2017 were shocking to many who witnessed it both in person and via the many media outlets that covered the story.


In class, we have begun our look at how so many societies, both historically and today, divide people into those who are identified as “us” and “them.” We do this in a whole variety of ways and the identification of an “us” and “them” are often changing and have a certain fluidity.


That said, what happened in Charlottesville takes any notion of “us” and “them” well beyond a version 2.0 of the concept.


Reporter Elle Reeve (then of VICE News) covered the story and took us inside the thinking of some of the perpetrators of the violence in Charlottesville. To say the least, this clip (which I asked you to watch in connection with this post) is both eye-opening and terrifying.


So here’s what I’d like you to address in this post:

  • Why? Why is this happening now? And what does it portend for the future? (Yes, 2017 was a few years ago now but as you might imagine, it’s easy to draw a line from Charlottesville to what happened on January 6, 2021 and the ongoing polarization in this country.)
  • How would we describe the phenomenon that seems to be at work in Charlottesville? What’s motivating the different folks protesting there and why do they see the world as they do?
  • Finally, how is this phenomenon connected to what we were doing in class this week—that is, looking at the phenomenon of “bubbling” and categorizing?

Just in case you were not in class on Wednesday, we watched nearly all of a documentary on what happened in Charlottesville, Virginia. The documentary was from PBS’ Frontline and was titled Documenting Hate, Charlottesville. Run time was 54 minutes.
jellybeans101
Boston, MA
Posts: 9

Who is the “we” and who is the “they”

• Why? Why is this happening now? And what does it portend for the future? (Yes, 2017 was a few years ago now but as you might imagine, it’s easy to draw a line from Charlottesville to what happened on January 6, 2021 and the ongoing polarization in this country.

They are using named tactics from European thinkers such Golden Dawn or the Nordic resistance movement. European thinkers are also the root of our problem todays coming to colonize the people of indigenous American. In Europe Spain’s Isabella and Ferdinan even expelled and punished Jews for practice the faith they believed in. In portends a future of conflict and egotistical close minded people who wrongly fully believe getting a message across means expelling and outcasting different groups of people.

  • How would we describe the phenomenon that seems to be at work in Charlottesville? What’s motivating the different folks protesting there and why do they see the world as they do?
  • Its crazy how the reporter used the term that these people are internet memes. I think a lot of people may thing its just a meme when what is happening is so important to our deep rooted historical issues. I think these people are very closed minded we see them with shields and helmets as if they are so prepared. They are coming ready for chaos knowing that they will cause chaos which baffles me. 


    • Finally, how is this phenomenon connected to what we were doing in class this week—that is, looking at the phenomenon of “bubbling” and categorizing?

    Theres a big phenomenon of race and ethnicity in relation to the bubble sheets. Everyone is labeled by religion and when people are walking down the streets of Charlottesville speaking of the Jews I feel like every single person is making an assumption putting all of these people who practice the same religion under the same umbrella when they are all different. Theres so many people who practice jewish faith from every part of the world and in their own ways. This even almost relates to the fact there is the words “other” or “Indian” on a bubble sheet when there is so much more depth in one ethnicity. 


    OverthinkingEnigma
    Boston, Massachusetts, US
    Posts: 13

    Who is the we and who is the they? Ruminating on the disquieting messages of Charlottesville

    • Why? Why is this happening now? And what does it portend for the future? (Yes, 2017 was a few years ago now but as you might imagine, it’s easy to draw a line from Charlottesville to what happened on January 6, 2021 and the ongoing polarization in this country.)

    This event and so many like it are now happening due to Trump’s presidency and his ideals. Trump and his movement opened up the door to the public rise of white supremacists, fascists, Neo-Nazi’s,the Ku Klux Klan, etc, all who were once in the shadows until Trump’s election. Now, the hate groups’ lack of fear of standing out or being ‘persecuted’ creates concern for the future considering the grave and chilling effects of Charlottesville. Moreover, the lack of prevention by the police or FBI are only enabling the actions of these hate groups, thus several white supremacists, etc, currently feel more safe because they indirectly have the support of the police force. If all members of these groups escape judgement and trial, it sends the message that events similar to that of Charlottesville are enabled and empowered. This fact lays the foundation for more organized attacks targeted at people of color, immigrants, people of Muslim or Jewish faith, and so on.


    • How would we describe the phenomenon that seems to be at work in Charlottesville? What’s motivating the different folks protesting there and why do they see the world as they do?

    Several white supremacists and Neo-Nazis are becoming more organized, united, and public, especially social media. With a white supremacist in office, emphasis on the “us and them” mentality advanced in Charlottesville. These hate groups saw themselves as defenders of the white culture and race, thus all who objected to their beliefs were deemed as the oppressor (‘them’). Moreover, Toxic masculinity is a common feature amongst these white supremacists and Neo-Nazis which asks the question, 'are you truly a man if you don’t follow this strict guideline?’ Moreover, frankly, white fragility is what seems to be at work in Charlottesville and the lack of knowledge or awareness of huge parts of history (such as slavery, indigenous peoples, etc) is the wall between these hate groups and acknowleding their white privilege. The most plausible reason to explain the lens of how these protestors see the world is hate shared from generation to generation. Racism, sexism, xenophobia, and all other forms of hate are taught and learned and this vicious cycle only can continue if the people today remain misinformed and misguided. This theory also correlates with the phenomenon of whether one’s actions and mentality are pre-determined based on how they were raised and the ideals they grew up learning. Simply put, these hate groups see the world as they do because that’s all they’ve ever known, misinformation that is.


    • Finally, how is this phenomenon connected to what we were doing in class this week—that is, looking at the phenomenon of “bubbling” and categorizing?

    This phenomenon connects to our discussions about how we automatically categorize people whether that be on their abilities, aspects of their personality, or simply race/ethnicity and religion. With these little background facts we form networks based on what we have in common or what we may want to steer clear of. However, these networks and categories could easily go south and have horrible results such as the development of harmful stereotypes for POC or people of different faith. Additionally, one’s identity determines who they will or will not draw in which explains how young white males are at risk of being exposed to white-supremacist ideology. Furthermore, there are various layers of the “us and them” mentality that range in severity, examples include different social groups in school or minorities versus the white majority.

    OverthinkingEnigma
    Boston, Massachusetts, US
    Posts: 13

    Originally posted by jellybeans101 on October 06, 2021 11:21

    • Why? Why is this happening now? And what does it portend for the future? (Yes, 2017 was a few years ago now but as you might imagine, it’s easy to draw a line from Charlottesville to what happened on January 6, 2021 and the ongoing polarization in this country.

    They are using named tactics from European thinkers such Golden Dawn or the Nordic resistance movement. European thinkers are also the root of our problem todays coming to colonize the people of indigenous American. In Europe Spain’s Isabella and Ferdinan even expelled and punished Jews for practice the faith they believed in. In portends a future of conflict and egotistical close minded people who wrongly fully believe getting a message across means expelling and outcasting different groups of people.

  • How would we describe the phenomenon that seems to be at work in Charlottesville? What’s motivating the different folks protesting there and why do they see the world as they do?
  • Its crazy how the reporter used the term that these people are internet memes. I think a lot of people may thing its just a meme when what is happening is so important to our deep rooted historical issues. I think these people are very closed minded we see them with shields and helmets as if they are so prepared. They are coming ready for chaos knowing that they will cause chaos which baffles me. 


    • Finally, how is this phenomenon connected to what we were doing in class this week—that is, looking at the phenomenon of “bubbling” and categorizing?

    Theres a big phenomenon of race and ethnicity in relation to the bubble sheets. Everyone is labeled by religion and when people are walking down the streets of Charlottesville speaking of the Jews I feel like every single person is making an assumption putting all of these people who practice the same religion under the same umbrella when they are all different. Theres so many people who practice jewish faith from every part of the world and in their own ways. This even almost relates to the fact there is the words “other” or “Indian” on a bubble sheet when there is so much more depth in one ethnicity. 


    I like that you pointed out the European naming tactics that circulate these hate groups, people don't really realize how much of the past still remains in the present. Nonetheless, I completely agree with you that society has normalized people being forced under umbrella terms for unexplained reasons.

    cnovav
    Boston, MA, US
    Posts: 10

    Who is the "we" and who is the "they"?

    This is happening now because of how fast the country is moving. In other words, things are changing, socially at least. It’s no longer an expectation that everyone lives the same lifestyle in the US. For some reason, that’s such a scary idea for them. For example, Robert Ray, a Neo-Nazi, spoke about how they need to get the country back because the country is “their” (referring to the white man) because it was founded by a bunch of white men also. Robert Ray and so many other people who think just like them are threatened by the fact that there are people who look and live differently than they do. They believe that the growing groups and organizations are all against them and want to rob them of “their” country. This is how the people from January 6, 2021 thought as well. They strongly believed that President Biden was against them (because that’s what President Trump convinced them) and was going to take the country from them and give it to minority groups and so they resorted to violence.


    The different groups that are protesting view the world in very different ways because of the way they have experienced the world. In the video one group is referred to as the “alt right” and the other can be referred to as the “alt left”. Members of the alt right constantly express their need to get rid of who they refer to as criminals. Those people are typically minorities, for example: black people, members of the LGBTQ+ community, different religious groups, etc. This is most likely because the life that they know so well, is a very conservative lifestyle. They have stuck to a pretty uniform and “normal” lifestyle where they are not exposed to people who are different from them. Because they don’t know much about the other people and their experiences, if a small group of those people commit crimes, they assume that the entire group is made up of criminals. Unfortunately they turn to violence and hate to “fix” the situation. The alt left is typically the group consisting of people who have experienced the exact opposite. They’ve lived around people who are very different and therefore have become more accepting of different groups of people. So as seen in the video, they want to fight back against the hateful rhetoric being spewed at themselves and others who are similar and/or different to them.

    When we looked at the various documents in class, it was a common theme among the documents that people are forced to fit themselves into a certain category racially and/or ethnically. The documents that asked you to bubble in an answer would almost always have very vague options that would easily fit everyone or very specific options that only allowed a select number of people to fit into the category. This further supports the idea that many people today want to remain as conservative as possible and force people into as few groups as possible. This could possibly be because certain groups feel threatened by the formation or acknowledgement of other groups. But it could also be because of their fear of losing what they’re so accustomed to without realizing the hate they are helping spread.

    booksandcandles
    Boston, MA, US
    Posts: 8

    Who is "we" and who is "they"?

    The events at Charlottesville in 2017 were appalling and quite honestly, terrifying. Many questions arose out of that day, such as why? Race is such a strange topic, because it's hard to place its actual meaning. But to some people, race is everything. White supremacists basically think that white people are better than any other race, and those feelings have become exacerbated in the past fifty years because of how far our country came in terms of slavery and segregation. After Obama, the first black president, white supremacists and even racist people in general were angered by that power of running the country in a black person's hands. Then Trump came along, and it all seemed like it was okay for them to take out their feelings on people protesting for certain things. Change is a difficult thing to deal with, especially if these feelings and views run back so far through time and history.

    I'm not sure why white supremacists see the world as they do, but it definitely goes back to the beginning of slavery in the U.S. Those feelings of being biologically better than others contributed, and now we have people who hate other races simply because they are not white. I would describe this phenomenon as being incredibly unstable, because people can get violent at any moment, as seen in Charlottesville and the other protests described in the video.

    This is connected to the bubbling and categorizing because although nothing in those forms talks about racism and hate, race is still used as a category. With the protests highlighted in the documentary, it was all about violence and hate towards people of other races, but in "bubbling" race is a way to describe someone. We've all used race as a method of characterization before, maybe even just to point someone out. But with white supremacy, that is magnified to include hating that person because of the category we put them in.

    iris almonds
    Posts: 12

    Who is the “we” and who is the “they”?: Ruminating on the disquieting messages of Charlottesville

    1. The events of Charlottesville were both upsetting and terrifying to watch. This video in particular was really interesting because it came from a perspective of a white supremacist rather than an anti- racists person. These events are happening now mainly because of the election of Donald Trump back in 2016 and the changes happening in the world related to race. Over the past few decades, the voices of people of color and minorities have been growing rapidly. Slavery became illegal, many segregation laws ended, and there are many more colored leaders in our country. The white supremacists believe that they were the founding fathers of this country and that the jews and blacks were making their country “filthy”. Before the election of Donald Trump in 2016, the white supremacists didn’t have much of a voice. But as Donald Trump came into power, they felt as if Donald Trump was on their side. They felt a sense of security and thought that it was the perfect time to use violence to drive out the unwanted people. The police were indirectly supporting them and Donald Trump himself was letting these events happen. The event at Charlottesville basically showed other white supremacists groups that these events were great and were not getting shut down. In the future, we can expect more violence from these white supremacists groups because they feel secure and know that they can do a lot of destruction.
    2. The phenomenon happening in Charlottesville consists of two groups: the white supremacists (alt-right) and the anti-racists group (alt-left). This brings us to the topic of “us” vs “they”. The people in each of these groups see the other group of people as “they”. Both groups hate each other and from the video, there showed no signs of compromise or the act of understanding each other’s points of view. The main reason that I think promotes the white supremacists to think the way they do is the fact that they grew up in a very conservative household. There are ideas passed down from generation to generation. They are uneducated about the other minorities and races present in the world, nor do they make an effort to learn about them. They lack awareness of the history of people of color and don’t look at life through different lenses. The alt-left group has been more exposed to the real world and its different groups of people. This group of people know about/have connections with the history of slavery, segregation, and many other events. This group of people knows how it is to be part of the minority and to be looked down upon. These people are mostly people who are open-minded and look at the world from a different lens. They are generally more accepting of all the different types of people and against the idea of racism.
    3. This phenomenon is very similar to what we are doing during class this week, the act of categorizing and bubbling people into specific categories. People divide themselves into specific groups based on race just like checking off a box. There is no consideration of the personality, background, or social status of that person. People in these specific race categories will often learn about ideas against another racial group without learning much about the other group. There are many different stereotypes formed for specific racial groups. People treat each specific race in a specific way. The protesting shown in the video is similar to bubbling because you were either in one group or the other, you couldn’t be between the white supremacists and the anti-racist group. This is similar to if you were multi-racial. You had to fit yourself into a specific group and only check one box. Categorizing people based on race creates toxic environments a lot of the time. This is similar to the difficulty of people choosing to check off only one box on a form.

    iris almonds
    Posts: 12

    Originally posted by booksandcandles on October 06, 2021 18:15

    The events at Charlottesville in 2017 were appalling and quite honestly, terrifying. Many questions arose out of that day, such as why? Race is such a strange topic, because it's hard to place its actual meaning. But to some people, race is everything. White supremacists basically think that white people are better than any other race, and those feelings have become exacerbated in the past fifty years because of how far our country came in terms of slavery and segregation. After Obama, the first black president, white supremacists and even racist people in general were angered by that power of running the country in a black person's hands. Then Trump came along, and it all seemed like it was okay for them to take out their feelings on people protesting for certain things. Change is a difficult thing to deal with, especially if these feelings and views run back so far through time and history.

    I'm not sure why white supremacists see the world as they do, but it definitely goes back to the beginning of slavery in the U.S. Those feelings of being biologically better than others contributed, and now we have people who hate other races simply because they are not white. I would describe this phenomenon as being incredibly unstable, because people can get violent at any moment, as seen in Charlottesville and the other protests described in the video.

    This is connected to the bubbling and categorizing because although nothing in those forms talks about racism and hate, race is still used as a category. With the protests highlighted in the documentary, it was all about violence and hate towards people of other races, but in "bubbling" race is a way to describe someone. We've all used race as a method of characterization before, maybe even just to point someone out. But with white supremacy, that is magnified to include hating that person because of the category we put them in.

    I totally agree with your point that change is a difficult thing, especially if views run back in history. Whites have been privileged for such a long time and it can be really hard to let go of that. I like how you mentioned the views of the white supremacists when Obama was president vs when Trump was president. It's true that Trump allowed white supremacists to be more confident.

    watermelon2
    Boston, MA, US
    Posts: 14

    Our country was built on racist beliefs that still affect the ways in which everyone interacts and sees one another. So why are events like this still happening now? It is because our country is inherently racist. We have leaders such as Trump, who are setting terrible examples, police who simply watch racist attacks take place, and others who spread lies and hatred. We are also living in a world where social media is a key factor in everyone’s lives. It allows for the spread of misinformation and racism, but has also been a way that people stand up against racism. So although the future seems to be full of more of the racist people that make up events such as these, it is also full of youth and leaders who are ready to stand up and demand change. Throughout the past year, activism has increased dramatically, so the real question is how the country, and the world, will respond to this increase. Will they support those demanding equality, or will they fight back against them, as people at the events such as the ones in Charlottesville did?


    What happened in Charlottesville was a direct result of the white supremacists’ racist beliefs. These people are motivated into believing that white people are superior, and anyone of a different race is worse, because of the world they grew up in. After all, as Ms. Freeman said, race itself is fiction. People have come up with an idea for race and what it should mean in our society, but the racial hierarchy and hatred in our country are because of past beliefs. If these white supremacists and other racist people grew up in a world or a family that didn’t support racist beliefs, it is unlikely that they would see the world the way that they do. This shows just how important it is to educate and inform young people about issues pertaining to race, sexuality, etc. The environment and information that youth have is crucial to their beliefs and ideas once they grow up.


    “Bubbling” and categorizing people by parts of their identity such as race or gender means that you are assuming that they can fit under one particular category. But in reality, when it comes to parts of one’s identity such as race, it isn’t something that can simply be “bubbled” in. By “bubbling” in information like your race, it is putting you in a certain category and therefore making many generalizations about who you are as a person. Similarly, the events that took place in Charlottesville were a direct result of people assuming negative things about others because of their race or certain parts of their identity. Many of the white supremacists in Charlottesville hated all the people of color, despite the fact that they knew nothing about them as individuals. By doing so, they were simply taking everyone who was categorized a certain way, and making negative assumptions and generalizations about everyone in that category.

    watermelon2
    Boston, MA, US
    Posts: 14

    Originally posted by iris almonds on October 06, 2021 19:57

    1. The events of Charlottesville were both upsetting and terrifying to watch. This video in particular was really interesting because it came from a perspective of a white supremacist rather than an anti- racists person. These events are happening now mainly because of the election of Donald Trump back in 2016 and the changes happening in the world related to race. Over the past few decades, the voices of people of color and minorities have been growing rapidly. Slavery became illegal, many segregation laws ended, and there are many more colored leaders in our country. The white supremacists believe that they were the founding fathers of this country and that the jews and blacks were making their country “filthy”. Before the election of Donald Trump in 2016, the white supremacists didn’t have much of a voice. But as Donald Trump came into power, they felt as if Donald Trump was on their side. They felt a sense of security and thought that it was the perfect time to use violence to drive out the unwanted people. The police were indirectly supporting them and Donald Trump himself was letting these events happen. The event at Charlottesville basically showed other white supremacists groups that these events were great and were not getting shut down. In the future, we can expect more violence from these white supremacists groups because they feel secure and know that they can do a lot of destruction.
    2. The phenomenon happening in Charlottesville consists of two groups: the white supremacists (alt-right) and the anti-racists group (alt-left). This brings us to the topic of “us” vs “they”. The people in each of these groups see the other group of people as “they”. Both groups hate each other and from the video, there showed no signs of compromise or the act of understanding each other’s points of view. The main reason that I think promotes the white supremacists to think the way they do is the fact that they grew up in a very conservative household. There are ideas passed down from generation to generation. They are uneducated about the other minorities and races present in the world, nor do they make an effort to learn about them. They lack awareness of the history of people of color and don’t look at life through different lenses. The alt-left group has been more exposed to the real world and its different groups of people. This group of people know about/have connections with the history of slavery, segregation, and many other events. This group of people knows how it is to be part of the minority and to be looked down upon. These people are mostly people who are open-minded and look at the world from a different lens. They are generally more accepting of all the different types of people and against the idea of racism.
    3. This phenomenon is very similar to what we are doing during class this week, the act of categorizing and bubbling people into specific categories. People divide themselves into specific groups based on race just like checking off a box. There is no consideration of the personality, background, or social status of that person. People in these specific race categories will often learn about ideas against another racial group without learning much about the other group. There are many different stereotypes formed for specific racial groups. People treat each specific race in a specific way. The protesting shown in the video is similar to bubbling because you were either in one group or the other, you couldn’t be between the white supremacists and the anti-racist group. This is similar to if you were multi-racial. You had to fit yourself into a specific group and only check one box. Categorizing people based on race creates toxic environments a lot of the time. This is similar to the difficulty of people choosing to check off only one box on a form.

    You mentioned that events like these are especially happening now because of Trump, and I completely agree. Ever since he gained popularity and became president, he had a huge influence on people throughout the entire country. I think he set an example that encouraged many people with similar beliefs as him to feel comfortable speaking up and to make their racist beliefs known. You explained this very well, by saying that Trump gave them a voice and a sense of security.

    Bluekoala
    Boston, MA, US
    Posts: 11

    Who is the “we” and who is the “they”?

    These waves of white supremacy are happening now because of the media attention they have received and encouragement from Donald Trump. During Obama’s presidency, white supremacists were not as bold and public about their views because Obama, being an African American, would’ve immediately condemned them and taken legal action against them. Trump, on the other hand, supported these white supremacists by praising them and never condemning them outright. In the press conference after the Charlositveville event, Trump placed blame on both sides and even tried to downplay the actions of the right side. There was no chance Trump would punish these white supremacists when he was president because many of them were his own supporters. As these white supremacists continue to go unpunished, they will become bolder and more passionate about their views which was displayed during the January 6 Capitol attack.


    The phenomenon that seems to be at work in Charlottesville is that these white supremacy beliefs have unified supporters so much so that they have begun to take real action through events and their online presence. The rapidly increasing division between “we” and “they” has led to hatred that is unable to be resolved because they are so set in their beliefs. Some have believed in these beliefs since their upbringing and others began through interactions, but the one thing they all have in common is that they continue to be surrounded by only people who share the same beliefs regarding race, specifically that white people are better than everyone else and their hatred towards every other group. Thus, they do not have any other perspectives on the world besides the one they have now. Although clearly not everyone who protested in Charlottesville shared the same views, they were all there that day because of their beliefs regarding race.


    In class, a big theme of the papers was grouping people based on their race which is what is happening now. During the protests, they chanted “White Lives Matter” and clearly expressed their hatred towards Jewish people and black people. This shows how the right have organized into white people and consider everyone else to be on the other side just based on race and ethnicity. For the white supremacists, the only criteria that matters is “bubbling” whether or not you are white. Nothing else that goes deeper than surface level traits is considered just like the categories of the forms from class.

    strawberry123
    Chestnut Hill, MA, US
    Posts: 12

    Who is "we" and who is the "they"?: Ruminating on the disquieting messages of Charlottesville

    • Why? Why is this happening now? And what does it portend for the future? (Yes, 2017 was a few years ago now but as you might imagine, it’s easy to draw a line from Charlottesville to what happened on January 6, 2021, and the ongoing polarization in this country.)

    In PBS' Frontline documentary, "Documenting Hate, Charlottesville", Reporter Elle Reeve takes us to get an inside on the rise of white supremists in our modern-day world, including their growing popularity and violent acts. Donald Trump, former President of the United States, led a dominating 4-year presidency with blame never being taken on his followers such as Neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan, racists, etc. Years before Trump took office, these groups may have been afraid to speak their mind, as they did not have the support of a powerful political leader; without this protection, the groups feared imprisonment and a lack of public support. In recent years, Trump has been a clear advocate for these groups, protecting them at times by saying "Both sides are equally at fault". Phrases such as these on national television not only divide the blame amongst the victims as well, but further fuels the white supremacist groups to do more organized attacks.

    • How would we describe the phenomenon that seems to be at work in Charlottesville? What’s motivating the different folks protesting there and why do they see the world as they do?

    The shocking phenomenon happening in Charlottesville is becoming harsher, more organized, and gaining even more support from political leaders and the public. These groups of people are going into these so-called "protests" with violent intentions and having racists thoughts and feelings: The motivation behind the protesting stems from a white superiority complex. Based on their actions, we can definitely make a conclusion that they have the same views as many colonists during the beginning of slavery. Oppression in Charlottesville is becoming unstable and irreversible.

    • Finally, how is this phenomenon connected to what we were doing in class this week—that is, looking at the phenomenon of “bubbling” and categorizing?

    This is connected to what we have been doing in class this week -- "bubbling" and categorizing -- as it shows race classified in a highly mannered way. In these attacks, race is the main reason for such harsh crimes with white supremacists hating on people of color. We can also see that a bubble is formed around this group as most cannot see where their vicious mindset stems from. Bubbling is also used here since there is an obvious division between the white supremacists and the anti-racist group. It seems that there is no middle ground nor a group where an opinion on the protest cannot be formed; you either support the racist crimes or you don't.

    Bluekoala
    Boston, MA, US
    Posts: 11

    Who is the “we” and who is the “they”?

    Originally posted by iris almonds on October 06, 2021 19:57

    1. The events of Charlottesville were both upsetting and terrifying to watch. This video in particular was really interesting because it came from a perspective of a white supremacist rather than an anti- racists person. These events are happening now mainly because of the election of Donald Trump back in 2016 and the changes happening in the world related to race. Over the past few decades, the voices of people of color and minorities have been growing rapidly. Slavery became illegal, many segregation laws ended, and there are many more colored leaders in our country. The white supremacists believe that they were the founding fathers of this country and that the jews and blacks were making their country “filthy”. Before the election of Donald Trump in 2016, the white supremacists didn’t have much of a voice. But as Donald Trump came into power, they felt as if Donald Trump was on their side. They felt a sense of security and thought that it was the perfect time to use violence to drive out the unwanted people. The police were indirectly supporting them and Donald Trump himself was letting these events happen. The event at Charlottesville basically showed other white supremacists groups that these events were great and were not getting shut down. In the future, we can expect more violence from these white supremacists groups because they feel secure and know that they can do a lot of destruction.
    2. The phenomenon happening in Charlottesville consists of two groups: the white supremacists (alt-right) and the anti-racists group (alt-left). This brings us to the topic of “us” vs “they”. The people in each of these groups see the other group of people as “they”. Both groups hate each other and from the video, there showed no signs of compromise or the act of understanding each other’s points of view. The main reason that I think promotes the white supremacists to think the way they do is the fact that they grew up in a very conservative household. There are ideas passed down from generation to generation. They are uneducated about the other minorities and races present in the world, nor do they make an effort to learn about them. They lack awareness of the history of people of color and don’t look at life through different lenses. The alt-left group has been more exposed to the real world and its different groups of people. This group of people know about/have connections with the history of slavery, segregation, and many other events. This group of people knows how it is to be part of the minority and to be looked down upon. These people are mostly people who are open-minded and look at the world from a different lens. They are generally more accepting of all the different types of people and against the idea of racism.
    3. This phenomenon is very similar to what we are doing during class this week, the act of categorizing and bubbling people into specific categories. People divide themselves into specific groups based on race just like checking off a box. There is no consideration of the personality, background, or social status of that person. People in these specific race categories will often learn about ideas against another racial group without learning much about the other group. There are many different stereotypes formed for specific racial groups. People treat each specific race in a specific way. The protesting shown in the video is similar to bubbling because you were either in one group or the other, you couldn’t be between the white supremacists and the anti-racist group. This is similar to if you were multi-racial. You had to fit yourself into a specific group and only check one box. Categorizing people based on race creates toxic environments a lot of the time. This is similar to the difficulty of people choosing to check off only one box on a form.

    I strongly agree that the upbringing of these white supremacists is a big reason why they are so passionate about their views. It is hard for anyone to break away from what they have always thought of and especially since they don’t have discussions with those who don’t share the same beliefs, they will continue to hold these beliefs.

    strawberry123
    Chestnut Hill, MA, US
    Posts: 12

    Originally posted by cnovav on October 06, 2021 15:56

    This is happening now because of how fast the country is moving. In other words, things are changing, socially at least. It’s no longer an expectation that everyone lives the same lifestyle in the US. For some reason, that’s such a scary idea for them. For example, Robert Ray, a Neo-Nazi, spoke about how they need to get the country back because the country is “their” (referring to the white man) because it was founded by a bunch of white men also. Robert Ray and so many other people who think just like them are threatened by the fact that there are people who look and live differently than they do. They believe that the growing groups and organizations are all against them and want to rob them of “their” country. This is how the people from January 6, 2021 thought as well. They strongly believed that President Biden was against them (because that’s what President Trump convinced them) and was going to take the country from them and give it to minority groups and so they resorted to violence.


    The different groups that are protesting view the world in very different ways because of the way they have experienced the world. In the video one group is referred to as the “alt right” and the other can be referred to as the “alt left”. Members of the alt right constantly express their need to get rid of who they refer to as criminals. Those people are typically minorities, for example: black people, members of the LGBTQ+ community, different religious groups, etc. This is most likely because the life that they know so well, is a very conservative lifestyle. They have stuck to a pretty uniform and “normal” lifestyle where they are not exposed to people who are different from them. Because they don’t know much about the other people and their experiences, if a small group of those people commit crimes, they assume that the entire group is made up of criminals. Unfortunately they turn to violence and hate to “fix” the situation. The alt left is typically the group consisting of people who have experienced the exact opposite. They’ve lived around people who are very different and therefore have become more accepting of different groups of people. So as seen in the video, they want to fight back against the hateful rhetoric being spewed at themselves and others who are similar and/or different to them.

    When we looked at the various documents in class, it was a common theme among the documents that people are forced to fit themselves into a certain category racially and/or ethnically. The documents that asked you to bubble in an answer would almost always have very vague options that would easily fit everyone or very specific options that only allowed a select number of people to fit into the category. This further supports the idea that many people today want to remain as conservative as possible and force people into as few groups as possible. This could possibly be because certain groups feel threatened by the formation or acknowledgement of other groups. But it could also be because of their fear of losing what they’re so accustomed to without realizing the hate they are helping spread.

    I really like how you referenced back to Robert Ray's perception of "needing to get their country back" since they still think that this is their country since white colonists "discovered" it. It was also a good addition in the second paragraph to include "alt-right" and "alt-left".

    pink12
    Boston, Massachusetts, US
    Posts: 12

    Who is "we" and who is "they"?

    - The tragedy that happened in Charlottesville is disgusting. As the world is moving at such a fast pace, and peoples ideas change, some are ruthless. Race can be everything to some people. For example when Obama was elected president, some people couldn't stand the fact that all the power was put into the hands of a black person. These people were white supremacists. After Trump became elected, all these hate groups that had been hiding for years, started to speak up. Not only using their voices but there actions became violent, which was shown in Charlottesville. White supremacists can't stand the fact that any other people besides white people have a voice. They created violent hate groups that during these rally's, target other races/religions.

    - Formed groups of white supremacists and Neo-Nazi's have been targeting other individuals based on race or religion. These groups have recently became more public and known, especially after what happened in Charlottesville. These groups will brutally attack others in very inhumane ways. White supremacists seem to think that they are above all other races and beliefs, and any people who stand in the way or disagree with them, deserve punishment. A theory for how these people grow up believing these things, may be based on how they are influenced and what they grew up learning. If they grow up in a family who heavily believes one way they may see no different, and don't realize how awful their thoughts really are.

    -The phenomenon connects to our discussions about how we categorize groups of people based on race, gender, ethnicity, and religion. Until we know someone's true identity, it's not fair to judge someone based on their looks. You can't form opinions on groups of people if you don't know their personality. This is a problem that society has today where everyone judges others based on looks or morals, and instead we need to get to know who someone truly is. We need to stop targeting others, we are all human.

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