posts 16 - 24 of 24
red
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 8

20 Years after September 11 2001

For the person I interviewed, 9/11/2001 started as a regular work day. It was a beautiful day and it began with going to her job at state street after having dropped off her son at the mulberry day care. 15 minutes after she arrived at work, someone in the office started shouting, “Oh my god, oh my god”. All of her coworkers huddled around the computer and came to the disturbing realization that a plane had hit one of the twin towers in New York. In the shock of the breaking news, she describes the office becoming still as everyone waited to register the information. When the second plane hit, the realization that it was not an accident struck and a heightened anxiety was felt in Boston. She remembers having chills after witnessing the crash. Seconds later an alarm sounded in the building and stated the recent news report, that they were evacuating the financial district and that there was a plane missing that was unaccounted for. As she grabbed her stuff from her desk and exited the building her first thought was to grab her son from daycare and get home. After having reached home safely she decided to take a walk around the neighborhood that was eerily quiet and she remembers seeing the fighter jets overhead, that broke the quiet.

The first thing she said without even thinking first, when asked what changed after 9/11, was “Everything changed.” She said the biggest difference directly after 9/11 was the increased paranoia and security. Getting into work was now monitored and you had to have your credentials to enter the building and there was a constant sense that there was a terrorist around every corner. Since then she believes that paranoia has decreased but the previous belief in America’s invincibility was shattered, after 9/11 was the first mainland attack on America. Since then, she believes that having the terrorists and people responsible for the attack should be held accountable, but the continued war and Islamophobia are not ways to heal from the attack saying “death paid with more death is never the answer.” To finish the interview she said that to this day 9/11 will always have an impact in people's minds and hearts through daily life, as well as in politics.

apples21
SOUTH BOSTON, MA, US
Posts: 10

20 Years after 9/11

The person that I interviewed said that on 9/11, they were working for their sales job in California that required them to travel. They said that they were leaving California in a few days. But due to the events on 9/11, they said to stay in California for a few extras days because all of the flights had been cancelled. They remember that on 9/11 they heard about the events through the radio, and that they were alone and was in shock. They said that when they talked to their coworkers everybody was in shock and it seemed like people barely even believed it, and also did not know how serious the situation was. They said that although she did not know anyone that was personally killed or hurt in the attacks, she feels that it was similar to how many Americans felt on that day, feeling distraught, upset and scared. They said that their brain was running rapidly and was thinking that this might increase the tensions between America and other countries. She said that she felt like after that day for many weeks to come the country felt scared and extremely upset, but also that it became a time where people came together. She says that it is still different now, especially around the time of September 11th every year, when people who were alive during the attacks look back on how horrible this time was. She said that the main thing that has changed is how airport security has ramped up, and things have mostly come back to normal, but she said for a few years after she said she had a slight irrational fear of flying. She says that she thinks that this event caused an upsetting wave of Islamophobia and that it sadly can still be found today.

watermelon2
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 14

20 years after 9/11

On September 9, 2001, it was around 8 in the morning, and my dad had just arrived at work. He began examining his first patient, who had tuberculosis. As he was listening to his patient’s breathing, the patient was looking at a TV on the ceiling. My dad looked up momentarily and he saw a video of an airplane crashing into a building. At first, he thought the patient was watching a movie until he realized that it was live news. He stopped examining his patient, and together they watched the TV in complete shock. Later that day, after his patient left, my dad frantically called his parents, who were living in New York. His first thought when learning about what happened was worrying about them. Luckily, both my dad’s parents were safe, so my dad didn’t have any direct connection to the 9/11 events. But although my dad’s parents were safe, my grandfather had to walk across the Manhattan Bridge to get home because everything was closed off. He explains that the air was thick with smoke and dust, even making it hard to see at times.


Despite not being directly affected by the incident, my dad explains that the events of 9/11 still had a massive impact on himself and the world around him. The day after the attacks, it had really settled in. My dad explains that on September 12th, the plain shock had gone away and was instead filled with a sinking fear for his safety and the safety of others. For days after, he tried to stay away from tall buildings, and he called friends in New York making sure they were ok. For the next few days after 9/11, my dad was put on-call in the emergency room at the hospital he was working at. They emptied it out to prepare to help victims of 9/11. Examples such as my dad's hospital clearing the emergency room for 9/11 victims helps me realize the hundreds of thousands of people that offered help after 9/11. In many ways, the devastation of 9/11 caused people to come together to help everyone.


Not only did my dad’s physical life change, but he also explains the effect that 9/11 had on the world. He felt that, after 9/11, America didn’t feel as safe. He saw that people began using the 9/11 attacks as an excuse to justify their racist behavior. He points out that many Americans were oppressing people of middle-eastern descent in an attempt to make America safer. But in doing so, they were actually doing the opposite. They were making anyone who wasn’t white in America feel unsafe and threatened. My dad also explains that he thinks the war with Afghanistan was unnecessary. Ever since 9/11, we’ve been in a war with Afghanistan because we feel like we’re defending our country. But instead, we’ve been causing many more to lose their lives and adding to the tension. An ongoing political debate in this country is about who deserves protection. By starting the war with Afghanistan, this was America’s way of saying that they were protecting Americans. They were allocating money and resources to war and fighting another country rather than using it to help our country heal and educate itself.


My dad’s story and thoughts show me that 9/11 affected millions of people throughout our country in so many different ways. Our lives and our stories are still influenced by the events that took place that day even 20 years later.

SlicedBread
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 12

20 Years After September 11th

Similar to iris almonds, the person I interviewed was not living in the US at the time. I will not say which country she was in for the sake of trying to preserve the anonymity of this post. However, she had lived in the US before.

It was about 11pm where she was when it happened. She didn’t hear about it until the next day, but she had friends who stayed up to follow the news. She heard the news at a car dealership after dropping off her car. The news kept playing it over and over again but she couldn’t look away. She said it was one of those situations where you want to look away because it’s so awful, but you just can’t.

Personally, she wasn’t directly affected by what happened, but she knew some people who had seen them fall, people who had to leave their work, and people who had lost loved ones. Particularly, she spoke about a woman who had seen the towers fall from her office window who couldn’t bear to go back to work and look out that same window again.

After 9/11 the possibility of something similar happening felt a lot more feasible to her. She would say that this new feeling of possibility is still different to this day. In fact, in recent years with other terrible events like the Boston Bombing, an increase in mass shootings and school shootings it feels even more plausible today. She is somewhat shocked that more plane attacks haven’t happened since however. One thing that she’s noticed has stayed the same since the event is that every year people still come together to mourn the event.

She finds that there isn’t much of a relationship between 9/11 and the current political debate in the country. 9/11 was an outside attack on the country, but the political debate now is an inside issue. Ever since the 2016 election, national political debate has been very centered around the inner divide within the country.

watermelon2
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 14

Originally posted by apples21 on September 13, 2021 22:35

The person that I interviewed said that on 9/11, they were working for their sales job in California that required them to travel. They said that they were leaving California in a few days. But due to the events on 9/11, they said to stay in California for a few extras days because all of the flights had been cancelled. They remember that on 9/11 they heard about the events through the radio, and that they were alone and was in shock. They said that when they talked to their coworkers everybody was in shock and it seemed like people barely even believed it, and also did not know how serious the situation was. They said that although she did not know anyone that was personally killed or hurt in the attacks, she feels that it was similar to how many Americans felt on that day, feeling distraught, upset and scared. They said that their brain was running rapidly and was thinking that this might increase the tensions between America and other countries. She said that she felt like after that day for many weeks to come the country felt scared and extremely upset, but also that it became a time where people came together. She says that it is still different now, especially around the time of September 11th every year, when people who were alive during the attacks look back on how horrible this time was. She said that the main thing that has changed is how airport security has ramped up, and things have mostly come back to normal, but she said for a few years after she said she had a slight irrational fear of flying. She says that she thinks that this event caused an upsetting wave of Islamophobia and that it sadly can still be found today.

I loved what your interviewee said about 9/11 being a time where "the country felt scared and extremely upset, but also a time where people came together." The amount of help and support that people throughout America gave was enormous. Even 20 years later, we hear about the countless ways that people demonstrated bravery or kindness by helping out during the 9/11 attacks. Many of the stories of what people sacrificed or did are powerful and moving.

SlicedBread
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 12

Reply to iris almonds-20 Years After September 11th

Originally posted by iris almonds on September 13, 2021 20:21

"On September 11th, 2001, my mother woke up to the humid air of another country, halfway across the world. She got up, brushed her teeth, and went to work like usual. After a long day of work, she came home, ate dinner, and was winding down for the night. At about 10 p.m., she was cleaning up her room and she decided to turn the TV on and watch the news. She was halfway across the world but reports have just came in that a plane has crashed into the World Trade Center."

The person I interviewed was also not in the country at the time. She had lived in the US before though, so I can't imagine how that must've felt for that to be one of your mom's first impressions of the country. It's weird to think about how if you had lived in the US at the time how difficult it would have been to not immediately know about it, whereas other people in other places could've had no clue about it for hours. I suppose that happens all the time though. Really shows how large a place the earth really is. It was truly remarkable to see people all over come together to mourn this tragedy. As you mentioned in your post with other countries playing the American anthem.

Bluekoala
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 11

20 Yeas after September 11, 2001

9/11 just so happened to be the day the person I interviewed had the day off from work. He lived in Back Bay at the time and he was taking a walk around the neighborhood near Copley. The first time he was aware of what was going on was when he saw people running from Prudential and other buildings. When he asked someone passing by why everyone was running, he was told that planes had crashed in the World Trade Center buildings. Everyone had been told to evacuate Prudential and other nearby skyscrapers because of fear that Boston would be hit next. The person I interviewed immediately went home and turned on the television and that’s when he saw footage of the burning World Trade Center for the first time. The person I interviewed remembers watching the television all day and how quiet the streets were. He felt tense and scared the entire day. Like many of the people interviewed by my classmates, such as Cnovav and strawberry123, the person I interviewed had just immigrated to the United States not long before 9/11. He wasn’t close with anyone in America yet so he couldn’t talk to anyone about what was going on. Both his parents and his sister were at work. He wasn’t directly affected by 9/11 nor did he know anyone who had been.

The person I interviewed explained how there was a scared and nervous feeling in the world after 9/11, but there was also a lot of comradery and support from everyone. He believes there is now no longer that same feeling of scaredness that there was after 9/11. The first time the person I interviewed flew on an airplane again, he immediately noticed the huge changes in TSA procedures. TSA had become much more strict and nitpicky about everything.

The person I interviewed strongly believes that there is a connection between the ongoing political debate regarding the Taliban and what happened on September 11. He mentioned how along with unity in the United States that came from 9/11, there was also a need for revenge among many people. The person I interviewed thinks this need for revenge and hatred has not disappeared from everyone in the United States which further continues the debate about the current situation in Afghanistan.

Karma
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 8

20 Years after September 11, 2001

The person I interviewed was my mom. She told me she was around 20 at the time and was working at Carney hospital in Boston. The way my mom found out about the terrorist attack was through a fellow nurse telling the other staff that a plane had hit one of the trade centers. After, all the other nurses gathered around a radio to listen into what was going on, not knowing if it was real or not. When they heard the second plane had hit, thats when they knew it was real life although it still did not feel real. At that point, she remembers not feeling any sense of security whatsoever. She, at that time, didn’t even feel saf in her own country for the next week. She didn’t know anyone affected but as a nurse she did understand the effects death has on a person or family as a whole.

seraphine
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 2

20 Years after 9/11

The person I interviewed had immigrated to America in October 1998 and had lived there ever since. She remembers how, since it was around 9:00 am, she was at work in the lab and once the information had reached her and her coworkers, the first thing she felt was shock- a sort of “this isn’t happening” thought (as is, many people were likely thinking this) and thought it was a careless pilot who had accidentally crashed. She didn’t find out until a bit later that it was intentionally done.

After finding out initially, everyone at work didn’t quite know what was going on. They discussed it while working and nobody knew who was going to be next. Everyone was really shaken up over it and was really upset that so many people had died. Luckily, though, nor she or any of her colleagues had anyone they directly knew in the Twin Towers.

She felt that afterwards, people were more united because everyone was shocked over the tragedy. Everyone valued life more and was more considerate. There was also a lot of islamophobia, though.

Like pareidolia, she felt that if 9/11 hadn’t happened, than many of the things that occurred in Afghanistan also wouldn’t have happened.

posts 16 - 24 of 24