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freemanjud
Boston, US
Posts: 250

Readings and watchings:

This video is a composite of all the key news footage that was produced between 8:30 am and noon on September 11, 2011. It’s a bit long but well worth watching.



Assignment:

What to do in class around the anniversary of September 11th is always a challenge but no more so than now when we are a class in which you were born—most likely—sometime between 2003 and 2005, correct? Your memory of this has to be from later, perhaps from things you heard or saw from family, friends, the media, or in school. Perhaps some of you and your families were directly affected: you lost family members or friends or had extended family/friends affected by what happened that day.


We will spend Monday, September 12th in class reflecting on the significance of 9/11, especially given that it is the 20th anniversary of the event and that the United States has just pulled its troop presence out of Afghanistan. And then we’ll dig a bit deeper.


Part I:

Read or watch the above linked materials. They will at least ensure that we are somewhat on the same page with basic info re September 11, 2001. To be certain, we have witnessed umpteen terrorist or terrorist-linked attacks since, including the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings. But still, September 11 really launched the 21st century in terms of the growth of terrorist attacks on major targets, like the World Trade Center towers, the Pentagon, etc. What’s happened in the intervening years in Paris, Madrid, Brussels, Istanbul, etc. remind us of the attacks that occurred in this country.


Part II:

After you watch the video and read the story of Jack Grandcolas, who tragically lost his wife and unborn child on 9/11, I’d like you to interview someone very informally. Insofar as you were quite young on 9/11, I ask you to interview an adult who has a clear memory of September 11th—maybe a parent or maybe another adult. Ask them these (among other questions of your invention!):


  • Where were they on 9/11?
  • What do they remember about the day overall as well as the big events of the day?
  • Were they directly affected in some way by what happened?
  • Did they know anyone who was?
  • And ask them as well: how did life/this country/the world change after 9/11?
  • If it was different on September 12, is it still different now?
  • What’s changed? What’s stayed the same?
  • And do they see any relationship between the ongoing political debate in this country and what happened on September 11th?

Note: Take general notes on what your interviewee has to say. We don’t need a transcript. We will all be eager to hear what you discover!


Without disclosing the name of the person you interviewed, briefly share/summarize their story with us. For instructions on how to post, see this doc (but the version in Google classroom)


pareidolia
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 1

20 years after 9/11

The person I interviewed for this was actually working as a knockoff clothing designer. One of the large events for luxury designers was and still is New York Fashion Week. This persons job was essentially to buy luxury items, cut them up find cheaper materials to make them out of and then send that to factories overseas. Thus being at large scale fashion events like this was in the job description even though the person could not go to the shows themselves. They were walking to a cafe to get some breakfast and talking on the phone with a friend when their cell service cut out. The last thing they heard on the other line was their friend talking about their recent trip to see the California Redwoods. They continued to walk for a bit before someone collapsed in the street upon hearing the news. They remember heating "somethings going on a plane just hit the world trade center". Eventually they got ahold of a friend who let them stay in his house. They weren't allowed to fly back home but this friend took the drive all the way back to Boston a few days later. Having come to this country two years earlier they didn't know anyone personally who passed away but they did know people with loved ones and friends who were injured or died.

"Afterwards there was this very real sense that something was wrong with the world. I couldn't wrap my head around it" is what they said when I asked. They remember coming back to Boston and having everything seem a little more scary because it could happen here too. In a lot of ways it put fear into their daily life. To them it felt like normal life came back too quickly because it had to. They talked about the idea that you kind of have to take it a step at a time. They said "It's like, yes there are terrorists who can just kill us all at any moment but also I have work tomorrow, I have to go buy groceries, you can't really think about it because you have actual responsibilities". They said that without 9/11 we never would have been in Afghanistan for as long as we were so of course it contributes to political debates that still happen today.

OverthinkingEnigma
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 15

20 Years after September 11

The person I had interviewed lived (and still does to this day) in a small apartment in Jamaica Plain with their husband. She had worked as a supervisor at a Bank of America, and her job consisted of helping customers with any questions, withdrawals, deposits, and supervising her co-workers. She and her husband’s morning routine consisted of waking up and ironing their clothes together in the living room while the T.V played daily news. She recalls the bright and bold letters, “Breaking News”, as news flooded in about a plane that had crashed into one of the twin towers. “The dark smoke surrounding the World Trade Center made the scene more horrific,” she said, and she had told me the undeniable feeling of grief she had towards the victims and their families. However, she had taken the crash as an accident and believed the number of victims would be many but not that of thousands. Then she had watched in horror as she saw the second plane crash into the second tower whilst newscasters, journalists, and simple citizens began to scream and run from the scene. She was dumbfounded and confused as to how this supposed accident could occur once again. However, her husband had beat the newscasters to their finalized reasoning for that day’s events, “no, no, this is no accident. This is a terrorist attack.” She told me how their eyes were glued to the screen and she and her husband couldn’t hold back their tears as people resorted to jumping out of the towers, “it was the only thing they could control in all the fire and chaos.”

She and her husband couldn’t stay at home and continue watching the news so they carried on and went to their jobs, waiting for the actions that might need to be taken in regards to the unfolding events. At the bank, workers were ordered to shut down the building since news declared that some of the hijacked planes had departed from Boston. She was forced to close their doors and stay with her co-workers as they continued to watch the news and eventually dismissed early. She had felt that the day was never ending and her thoughts were nothing but dark and blurry, but she could perfectly recall how time stopped when watching the T.V.

After the events of 9/11, the country was thrown into a state of anxiety and caution. Security became more rigid and needed. She along with thousands of people felt unsafe when it came to transportation and they grew scared of any planes flying over. On September 12th, she said the feelings of the day before only lingered and the fear of another attack was on everybody’s mind. However, on September 12th 2021, she claims the horror of 9/11 still remains but it doesn’t haunt the generations who had never witnessed that day unfold. Moreover, the fear of another terrorist attack doesn’t hang so evidently in the air. When it comes to what has changed, she tells me of the dramatic increase of Islamophobia among people of all ages with their main reasoning being 9/11. Yet targeting an entire community because of one event is something she says has stayed the same, a prime example being the rise of Asian hate. Nonetheless, another change she states is the greater unison among the nation after coming together to provide aid to New York.

Furthermore, the person I interviewed believes there’s not much connection between 9/11 and ongoing political debate (at least in respect to those in power/politicians) in this country especially in comparison to other areas of the world such as France. However, from a citizen’s point of view,she states there’s talk of Islamophobia and stereotypes towards those of Islamic faith which fuels political areas like immigration policies.

cnovav
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 13

20 Years after September 11, 2001

The person I interviewed was working in Norwood, Massachusetts at the time 9/11 occurred. Weirdly enough when I asked them where they were on 9/11, they immediately told me that even though they were far from the actual event, they felt closer than what even felt possible. At the time she was working a small scale job because she had yet to receive her citizenship after being in the country for 5 years. Her supervisor was always a very emotionless and stern person, so when he walked into the office she and several others were working in with tears running down his face, they knew something was wrong. She remembers the rasp in his voice and how he could barely get his words out. "You guys can stop working” he said as he turned on the television at around 9:00 a.m to reveal BREAKING NEWS front and center on the screen. It was at this moment that she remembers feeling absolutely sick to her stomach. They were allowed to go home early that day. And although she didn't know anyone from the tragedy, she believed her co-workers never acted quite bright and cheerful after that day. They weren't the same.


She remembers that the next day, September 12, 2001, was the day she had to go to her flag swearing ceremony to complete her citizenship process. “That day was supposed to be a happy day. I was supposed to be excited. But obviously I’d be a terrible person if I was happy the day after 9/11. That’s what it felt like”. She felt as though everything and everyone was moving in slow motion, “I don’t know if it’s because they were trying to be careful or what. But it made me angry that we were going about our normal lives when thousands of people lost theirs hours before”. Her raw emotions turned into anger because any feeling was better than the deep feeling of sadness she and others felt that day, week, month, year, and years to come.


When asked “do you see a relationship between ongoing politics and that day specifically’ she sternly answered “absolutely not”. “Nothing could ever compare to that day. Nothing. I mean, there've been other attacks on this country that have made me feel terrible, but, I don’t know, I’ve never felt that feeling before 9/11 and to this day I still haven’t”.

dinonuggets
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 13

20 Years after September 11, 2001

My mom went to work in Somerville on the morning of 9/11. She went to her office early to attend a construction meeting with an architect and contractor for a project. She remembers that the towers had already been hit when she was in the meeting. The architect was concerned that the heat would melt the steel in the towers, causing them to collapse, and they did. Those at the office were sent home early and told to shelter their houses. My mom called her husband asking him to return home from work. Her mom, who was visiting from India, was supposed to take the train to New Jersey and she remembers being terrified for mother’s safety. For the rest of the day everyone was glued to the TV. Luckily, she didn’t know anyone who was hurt or killed in the event. She was especially concerned for her mother, who only wears traditional Indian clothing. My mom said there were so many attacks on brown people in general and the amount of ignorance and hatred was astounding. She and her friends would talk about how unfathomable the attacks were and try to make sense of them. After 9/11, the airport security in the US reminded her of the security in India - a military-like presence and a lot more tension. My mom said it was ironic to her that the US combatted violence with more violence. She noted that so many more people have been killed as a result of the “war on terror” than those killed in the 9/11 attacks.

strawberry123
Chestnut Hill, MA, US
Posts: 15

20 Years After September 11

The person that I interviewed when asking what their experience and day was like on September 11, 2001, was a woman living in South Boston, Massachusetts at the time. The woman was home for the day as she was feeding her one-month-old son. She had only been living in America for about a year now as she had moved from Eastern Europe with her husband as emigrants. The couple's home country was battling dictatorship as well as a state of depression with fraud stock companies arising. They had hoped a move to the country where "dreams come true" would ultimately provide their future children the best life possible. Leaving behind her education, family, and friends, the woman became one of the millions scrambling after the American dream.

After continuing her early, Tuesday morning with her newborn, the woman decided to turn on the news and try to understand the few English familiar words she could make out. This was beyond reading a simple weather report for the day but rather videos and BREAKING NEWS reports flashed her screen. In awful shock, she telephoned her husband who was out working his 18-hour construction job, and stuttered out the questions of what was happening in America. Him, being clueless and unaware of the tragic events, quickly reassured his wife that everything would be okay, as they were not anywhere near New York and also do not know there were two other hijacked planes that would later hit Pennsylvania and the Pentagon.

After days to come, the woman explained the eerie silence that waved over the country. Her hopes and beliefs of what the United States would be able to offer left her spirits. The television stayed on the American news station as interesting stories of that day continued on and on. Six months after the event, the couple decided to take a trip back to their home country which led them to take a flight at Boston Logan Airport. The amount of control and security that they had was beyond measurable, the woman explained. A sense of safety but also uncomfortableness ran through her body as she lurked around the people in her gate that would go on the flight with her. She prayed before, during, and after the flight for herself, her husband, and her baby. She wasn't the only one, however, people all over the plane kept an anxious face the entire time.

When asked if anything has changed or remains, the woman automatically responded with the airport security systems' massive improvement. She also added the xenophobia that lasted and grew in this country. As a Catholic woman coming from a Muslim family, she felt utter disgust at some reports that were allowed to be said on the news. She had a mix of anger and sadness that raged through her. In discussion with recent political events and 9/11, itself, the woman found there to be no connection between the two.

strawberry123
Chestnut Hill, MA, US
Posts: 15

Originally posted by dinonuggets on September 13, 2021 19:00

My mom went to work in Somerville on the morning of 9/11. She went to her office early to attend a construction meeting with an architect and contractor for a project. She remembers that the towers had already been hit when she was in the meeting. The architect was concerned that the heat would melt the steel in the towers, causing them to collapse, and they did. Those at the office were sent home early and told to shelter their houses. My mom called her husband asking him to return home from work. Her mom, who was visiting from India, was supposed to take the train to New Jersey and she remembers being terrified for mother’s safety. For the rest of the day everyone was glued to the TV. Luckily, she didn’t know anyone who was hurt or killed in the event. She was especially concerned for her mother, who only wears traditional Indian clothing. My mom said there were so many attacks on brown people in general and the amount of ignorance and hatred was astounding. She and her friends would talk about how unfathomable the attacks were and try to make sense of them. After 9/11, the airport security in the US reminded her of the security in India - a military-like presence and a lot more tension. My mom said it was ironic to her that the US combatted violence with more violence. She noted that so many more people have been killed as a result of the “war on terror” than those killed in the 9/11 attacks.

Post your response here.

Wow! I love how in the last part of your interview, you mentioned that "the U.S. combatted violence with more violence" because I think that is something that we don't talk enough about as we think about the days after the tragic event. It is also very sad to hear that something so innocent as traditional clothing from one's culture can put them in a place of risk and danger. Thanks for sharing your mother's story!

user01135
West Roxbury, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 12

20 Years After 9/11

The person I interviewed was working at the CNN center in Atlanta, Georgia. She had been living in Boston with her husband and working in Boston and traveled to Atlanta for a work trip. She remembers everyone around her was scared, but at the same time nobody could believe that it really happened. Her father worked in the World Trade Center when she was younger and she had been 2 blocks away 2 days prior to the attack, so seeing buildings and parts of the city that were so familiar it could not seem real. The buildings seemed too big and strong to ever be taken down. She also remembers the lack of communication as phones did not work and she wasn't able to contact her family. The silence was unbelievable. She was in a meeting with over 100,000 people and it was dead silent. Everyone was worrying trying to find ways home and wondering if things would ever be okay. She was directly affected as she had no contact with her family, who thought she was still in New York City and drove hours looking for her. 2 of her colleagues were inside the building and were killed in the attacks. At the time, the world became very united. All of a sudden people from all over the world were angry and overwhelmed by the violence of the attacks, and they all worked together to help each other. The Middle Eastern/Muslim community took a lot of backlash, people who had been living in America their whole lives were hated because of stereotypes faced by other Americans. Guantanamo Bay was reopened and used to torture anyone who they thought could have information about the attacks. Yes things that changed are still different now, but everyone has gone back to being hectic and busy without as much fear. Everyone remembers the attacks but not as many retain the importance. One thing that has changed is that people don't consider America as the most powerful country in the world. There is a level of fear that nobody ever understood. Something that changed was the heightened awareness of a future attack. Airports began checking people and trying to prevent any more attacks, which they still do today. But the amount of stereotype also decreased and people began coming together again. She believes that what is happening currently in Afghanistan is a direct result of 9/11 she thinks we went there to protect people, but maybe we never should have been there in the first place. Maybe we built the monster that we are dealing with.

iris almonds
Posts: 16

9/11 from halfway across the world

On September 11th, 2001, my mother woke up to the humid air of another country, halfway across the world. She got up, brushed her teeth, and went to work like usual. After a long day of work, she came home, ate dinner, and was winding down for the night. At about 10 p.m., she was cleaning up her room and she decided to turn the TV on and watch the news. She was halfway across the world but reports have just came in that a plane has crashed into the World Trade Center. My mother’s first initial thought was “Is this real?”. My mother was in a long-distance relationship with her soon-to-be husband and her soon-to-be husband (my dad) was in America at the time, specifically in Boston. My mother did not know the geography of America and didn’t know how close or far away Boston was from New York. So she immediately called my dad to make sure everything was okay. My dad was okay but he was both shocked and scared as he knew there was a possibility that Boston was a target.


My mother was not directly affected by 9/11, but it left her in fear and uncertainty. She was going to immigrate to America soon for several reasons: one, she wanted to join her fiance, and two, she knew that America was the land of opportunity. 9/11 did not prevent her from coming to America, but it certainly made her question America. Was it actually a land full of opportunities? Some of her lingering thoughts as news came in was “Why would people do this kind of stuff?” “Why would the terrorist want to kill so many people?”. At this time, my mother did not speak English and was not educated in politics, so she didn’t really know what was going on. She did not know anyone who was affected by 9/11, but she did have great fear for her fiance.


My mother was not in America at the time of 9/11 so she didn’t really know how things were like before 9/11. Despite this, she did notice some changes in America when she arrived in 2003. Compared to what she saw on the news and updates from her fiance, one of the most prominent changes was the security in the airport. From watching the news, she saw people unite and come together and she saw other countries playing America’s national anthem. She connected it with the pandemic wondered why people can’t unite and fight covid as they did with 9/11, similar to Jack’s thoughts. Life changed and people were in grief for a long time. It was a very tragic moment in history and she thought that more people were scared to go on airplanes.


September 12, 2001, was definitely different from September 12, 2021. The fear, shock, and anxiety that she experienced that night can never be recreated. As the years pass, the memory fades more, and the feelings that she felt become more blurred. My mother thinks that fewer people care about 9/11 and proceeded to discuss the ideas of racism towards Muslims. On 9/12/01, there was more confusion and fear and on 9/12/21, it was more of people reflecting on what happened. One of the biggest changes since 9/11 was airport security and how it takes much longer for people to get on a plane than it did back in the 90s. Another thing that changed was that people were more united and came together in a common cause which was a thing she has not seen before. Nothing really stayed the same after 9/11 because the whole world was practically affected. My mother definitely thinks that 9/11 was politically related. Although she did not know it at the time, she is more educated in what is happening in Afghanistan and knew that America pulled brought all the troops home. She is not really sure about what is happening with the Taliban and is a bit confused, but thinks 9/11 was definitely affected by it.


iris almonds
Posts: 16

Originally posted by strawberry123 on September 13, 2021 19:09

The person that I interviewed when asking what their experience and day was like on September 11, 2001, was a woman living in South Boston, Massachusetts at the time. The woman was home for the day as she was feeding her one-month-old son. She had only been living in America for about a year now as she had moved from Eastern Europe with her husband as emigrants. The couple's home country was battling dictatorship as well as a state of depression with fraud stock companies arising. They had hoped a move to the country where "dreams come true" would ultimately provide their future children the best life possible. Leaving behind her education, family, and friends, the woman became one of the millions scrambling after the American dream.

After continuing her early, Tuesday morning with her newborn, the woman decided to turn on the news and try to understand the few English familiar words she could make out. This was beyond reading a simple weather report for the day but rather videos and BREAKING NEWS reports flashed her screen. In awful shock, she telephoned her husband who was out working his 18-hour construction job, and stuttered out the questions of what was happening in America. Him, being clueless and unaware of the tragic events, quickly reassured his wife that everything would be okay, as they were not anywhere near New York and also do not know there were two other hijacked planes that would later hit Pennsylvania and the Pentagon.

After days to come, the woman explained the eerie silence that waved over the country. Her hopes and beliefs of what the United States would be able to offer left her spirits. The television stayed on the American news station as interesting stories of that day continued on and on. Six months after the event, the couple decided to take a trip back to their home country which led them to take a flight at Boston Logan Airport. The amount of control and security that they had was beyond measurable, the woman explained. A sense of safety but also uncomfortableness ran through her body as she lurked around the people in her gate that would go on the flight with her. She prayed before, during, and after the flight for herself, her husband, and her baby. She wasn't the only one, however, people all over the plane kept an anxious face the entire time.

When asked if anything has changed or remains, the woman automatically responded with the airport security systems' massive improvement. She also added the xenophobia that lasted and grew in this country. As a Catholic woman coming from a Muslim family, she felt utter disgust at some reports that were allowed to be said on the news. She had a mix of anger and sadness that raged through her. In discussion with recent political events and 9/11, itself, the woman found there to be no connection between the two.

Post your response here.

Your story is very relatable! My mother planned to come to America in the coming year (2002) in hope of a better future. She thought that America was a land of opportunity and hoped to come so that her future children could have a better life as her home country was also in poverty. During my interview with my mother, she also emphasized the point of airport security and said several times how much more it took to get on a flight. Coming to America in 2002, my mother was also scared to get on an airplane and barely understood any English well. She mentioned how she visited the site where the World Trade Center collapsed and said that the air was still terrible and how there was still smoke and debris everywhere. Thank you so much for sharing your story!

jellybeans101
Boston, MA
Posts: 10

I interviewed a now business man who has lived in Wichita,Kansas. Contrasting to the the bustling city of New York.

1. I was in class, in the 7th grade.

2. I was too young to comprehend the magnitude of the event, and the symbolism of the two World Trade Centers. I do remember all the teachers and the adults showing deep concerns and distraught.

3. I was not directly affected by the event.

4. I did not know anyone who was directly affected.

5. There was many important changes due to the attacks. One being the creation of The Patriot Act. The Act made it easier for us to investigate suspicious terrorist activities, it also enabled us to surveillance the public in order to protect us against terrorism. Another feature of the Act was to monitor our monetary systems for suspected money laundering to fund terrorist activities. Another change due to the attacks were improvements to security towards our air travel system. TSA checkpoints became immensely secure from before, and prior items that were allowed on airplanes were no longer permitted.

8. I was too young to understand any political conflicts at the time.

facingstudent8
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 16

20 Years after September 11, 2001

The person I interviewed was working as a social worker at the time and they were going to a clinical team meeting and they recalled looking up at the sky and it was “one of the most gorgeous days and the sky was an incredible blue”. They went into their meeting around 8:30 and about an hour in they recalled that about an hour into the meeting there were people bustling around outside the conference room and a few people came in to talk to the director a couple of times. Then the whole staff was placed into small groups which was not out of the ordinary and then they were told two planes have hit the world trade center and it was believed to be terrorism. They were also told to get into contact with those you may know in New York and “do what you need to do”. Then they left and were coming out of the building and looked up at the sky wondering what it all meant. They called their sister and mother on the way home to their wife. On the way home, they also started seeing fighter planes over Boston making large circles because they didn’t know where the next attack would be and at that point, they knew the flights that hit the towers had originated out of Boston. When they went to their main office building everyone was still watching it but the staff was sent home and told to keep in contact with clients who might need support. Every channel was covering the attack constantly for days. In the following days, there was a great amount of fear and anxiety about the possibility of another imminent attack.

They also added that there is a “storyline that gets told about people being united and coming together but for me this is life altering and especially for people that look a certain way and there was some video shown of people in the arab world celebrating the fall of the towers which led to great amounts of hatred and i remember the first man killed was a Sikh man working at a gas station in Arizona”. I asked them about islamophobia and 9/11 and they talked about how this really was a turning point for islamophobia in America. This made me ask the question “Was 9/11 the start of or the catalyst for islamophobia in the United States?” To this they responded it was more the catalyst since there was some Islamophobia prior to 9/11 but 9/11 just made it all the more excusable and normalized.

pink12
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 13

20 Years after September 11, 2001​

The person that I interviewed when asking what their experience and day was like on September 11, 2001, was a women living in Boston, Massachusetts. She was flying from Texas to Boston and was supposed to leave on September 11 at 9 am, but thankfully decided to fly out of Texas on a red eye at 10pm September 10th. On September 11th, she was working at home as psychologist for companies, where she helps out employees in Boston, Texas, New York, and New Jersey. She remembers sitting in front of the tv watching the news and hearing that two planes just hit the word trade center. Sitting their in disbelief she immediately called her sister who works in New York. She described the call with her sister as terrifying as she heard her sister trembling in fear with what she just witnessed. As she explained, September 11th had some drastic effect on almost everyone and it completely shook the nation. Nothing was the same as days followed. No one was flying, everyone was glued to the tv scared for what could happen next, and others were still in hope that their loved ones were alive.

She soon had to take client calls where some of her employees who worked in New York were completely shook, and others who had been affected by those who they knew and loved. These calls were not easy to make and the fear and calls that she remembered were unbearable. Clients were describing all the terror and fear they saw, and they couldn't figure out how to move on from it. This was not an easy position for her but this was her way of helping others through such a hard time.

A drastic change that she described were the levels of security that places like airports soon enforced. This event caused a level of fear that Americans never thought that they would endure. Just like today, airports started to have high levels of security to make sure no weapons or possible threats could be on planes.


facingstudent8
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 16

Originally posted by dinonuggets on September 13, 2021 19:00

My mom went to work in Somerville on the morning of 9/11. She went to her office early to attend a construction meeting with an architect and contractor for a project. She remembers that the towers had already been hit when she was in the meeting. The architect was concerned that the heat would melt the steel in the towers, causing them to collapse, and they did. Those at the office were sent home early and told to shelter their houses. My mom called her husband asking him to return home from work. Her mom, who was visiting from India, was supposed to take the train to New Jersey and she remembers being terrified for mother’s safety. For the rest of the day everyone was glued to the TV. Luckily, she didn’t know anyone who was hurt or killed in the event. She was especially concerned for her mother, who only wears traditional Indian clothing. My mom said there were so many attacks on brown people in general and the amount of ignorance and hatred was astounding. She and her friends would talk about how unfathomable the attacks were and try to make sense of them. After 9/11, the airport security in the US reminded her of the security in India - a military-like presence and a lot more tension. My mom said it was ironic to her that the US combatted violence with more violence. She noted that so many more people have been killed as a result of the “war on terror” than those killed in the 9/11 attacks.

Post your response here.

It's so interesting what your mom said about the irony of how the US combats violence with more violence. It definitely feels like it is adding more gas to the fire and this is definitely something we see the US tends to do a lot with conflicts like worsening the problem with a military precense. This also reminds me of the Gandhi quote "An eye for an eye will leave the whole world blind". Here it's applicable because the metaphorical blindness we are all experiencing is due to the violence and war waged on one another.

booksandcandles
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 11

20 years after 9/11

I interviewed a friend of my family. She lives with her husband and two kids in Chicago. When I asked about her experience on 9/11, here's what she said (summary):

On September 11, 2001, I was in Manhattan at work. I worked for Marie Claire magazine as a news writer. I remember two things distinctly: what I was wearing (a striped shirt, black pants, and flats) and the fact that my boss allowed everyone into her private office to watch the news, since there was only one TV in the whole office. We were all just working, when we heard our boss get a call, on which she said something like, "A plane? Really? It can't have crashed into the building like that." And we were all curious and confused. So once she got off the phone, we asked her what was going on. She told us what had happened, that a plane had just crashed into the World Trade Center. The first thing I did was call my husband to make sure he was okay, even though he didn't work in Manhattan. Then I called my parents. I told them I was alright and that I would update them when I could. Everyone in the office was calling their parents, friends, children if they had them. It was all very chaotic. Then we all huddled up in our boss' office to watch the news. Everywhere, on every channel, was the same thing. We all sat with our eyes glued to the screen for about 30 minutes, when suddenly, we all watched as the second plane flew into the second tower. At this point we were all scared and panicking. Then we heard that all of South Manhattan was getting evacuated, and that we should all make our ways home. But if you lived south, go north. They told us to just go north. Now a bunch of people were wearing really impractical clothes, because it was a fashion magazine. That's why I remember to this day exactly what I was wearing. We had a storage closet for clothes that different designers had sent to us, and for the first time ever, we were allowed to go in and borrow clothes from it. After a friend and I were all situated, I called my husband one last time to tell him where I was going, and we left. I came home and met my husband, and we just sat by the TV all day. We had all the windows closed and the doors locked, but even weeks after, we could smell the smoke and ash.

She felt that many New Yorkers, including herself, were offended by the attack, like "How dare they attack our way of life?" She repeated this sentiment throughout the interview, repeating, "How dare they?" To this day, she doesn't look at any footage from that day, or watch any memorials, because she feels as though they are for people who were more affected by the event than she was. She feels like they aren't for her, more fore the families and loved ones of those who died that day.

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