posts 1 - 15 of 32
freemanjud
Boston, US
Posts: 205

Readings and Watchings:

Note: It’s important that you read and/or watch at least FOUR (4) of the 8 items listed below AND clearly reference them in your post. These are listed in chronological order; I would especially urge you to include within your choices #4 from Human Rights Watch (HRW).


  1. Video from the Los Angeles Times: Epidemic of Hate: Asian Xenophobia and Coronavirus, February 3, 2020 [7:55] https://youtu.be/7nlenypkMww and the accompanying article Suhuana Hassan, “Fear of coronavirus fuels racist sentiment targeting Asians, Los Angeles Times, February 3, 2020. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Z4iu--gthgMAwX2iuQdjeCkrGDwqvmTx/view?usp=sharing

  1. Ivan Natividad, “Coronavirus: Fear of Asians rooted in long American history of prejudicial policies,” Berkeley News, February 12, 2020

https://news.berkeley.edu/2020/02/12/coronavirus-fear-of-asians-rooted-in-long-american-history-of-prejudicial-policies/


  1. Stephanie Garcia, “’I am not a Virus’: How This Artist is Illustrating Coronavirus-Fueled Racism,” PBS, April 1, 2020. https://www.pbs.org/newshour/arts/i-am-not-a-virus-how-this-artist-is-illustrating-coronavirus-fueled-racism

  1. “Covid 19 fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide,” Human Rights Watch, May 12, 2020.

https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/12/covid-19-fueling-anti-asian-racism-and-xenophobia-worldwide


  1. Anna Purna Kambhampaty and Haruka Sakaguchi, “’I Will Not Stand Silent.’ 10 Asian-Americans Reflect on Racism During the Pandemic and the Need for Equality.” Time, June 25, 2020.

https://time.com/5858649/racism-coronavirus/


  1. Article and video: Erin Donaghue, “2,120 Hate Incidents Against Asian Americans Reported During Coronavirus Pandemic,” CBS News, July 2, 2020 https://www.cbsnews.com/news/anti-asian-american-hate-incidents-up-racism/

  1. Sarah Li, “Anti-Asian Hate Has Surged during the Coronavirus Pandemic, Reports Find,”

Teen Vogue, September 18, 2020.

https://www.teenvogue.com/story/anti-asian-racism-stop-aapi-hate


  1. Felix Sitthivong, “Coronavirus has sparked another epidemic in my prison: Anti-Asian Racism,” The Marshall Project, December 3, 2020. https://www.themarshallproject.org/2020/12/03/coronavirus-has-sparked-another-epidemic-in-my-prison-anti-asian-racism

__________________________________________________________________________

The President repeatedly refers to it as the “China virus” or the “Asian flu.” Insofar as we first became aware of a COVID-19 in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, that association has regrettably stuck for many Americans. And what it has unleashed, not only in the United States but in far-flung places around the world, is anti-Chinese vitriol and, because of the long history of Asian interchangeability by non-Asians, anti-Asian views more broadly.


Xenophobia directed at Asians isn’t new, as we will see this week in class. What COVID has inspired is just the latest in a long history of anti-Asian hate.


The Asian population in the United States, according to the US Census (as of 2018), as of, is believed to number 22.6 million people, roughly 5.6% of the total population in the nation. According to the Pew Research Center, Asian-Americans constitute the “highest-income, best-educated and fastest-growing racial group in the United States.”


So many non-Asians can’t distinguish among Asians—witness Valerie Soh’s keenly observed short All Orientals Look the Same [pointedly using the pejorative term, “Orientals”] so they lump Asians all together. Not unlike the Native American voices we heard in December who wish that we would identify Native peoples by their tribes and not label them all “native” or “indigenous,” many Asians too wish people would acknowledge their specific places of origin, their differing circumstances, cultures, and histories, and not simply assume that “sameness.” Yet we know that this is not the reality in the United States of 2021.


So why the hate? And why is this hate not new but is based in a long history of anti-Asian discrimination? And why are most non-Asians—and some Asians--minimally aware of this history?


Maybe those are foolish questions. What we know from our work on discrimination and othering thus far is that issues of “us” and “them,” “superiority” and “inferiority,” the desire to identify an “in group” and an “out group” govern much of human interaction.


So how have Asians—who we already know are classified as “white” when it’s convenient (think of the example of the Boston School Committee) and are also classified as “other” or “POC”—confronted this othering? The latest version may be triggered by COVID but we know this has a long and sordid history. How does this relate to what we saw with Executive Order 9066 (in the film Alternative Facts: The Lies of Executive Order 9066 that you watched for Tuesday/Wednesday class)? And what should non-Asians do today to be allies in response to what these articles, the film, and the video clips chronicle?


Please weigh in on these questions in a thoughtful, well-supported post, supported by what you learned from class, from the readings and from what you know from your own experiences. And please do post a question for the next person to post (and respond to the question posed prior to your posting!).


razzledazzle8
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 28

The American Education system needs to include Asian-Americans too!

Xenophobia and discrimination against Asian-Americans have been in America ever since the 1800s. The most outstanding act of discrimination and racism in the 1800s was the “1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, which prevented Chinese laborers from immigrating to the United States”, which was spoken about in the UC Berkeley article by Ivan Natividad. A few examples of discrimination throughout history in America mentioned in the same article aren’t from that long ago, for example, “a federal law was passed in 2018 to restrict Chinese student and scholar immigration to America”. Also, this related to the film, Alternative Facts: The Lies of Executive Order 9066 because much like in World War 2 there are more lies being spread about Asian-Americans during COVID. For some reason, that history isn’t talked about often in history classes and I believe it is because America doesn’t want to own up to what they have done to the Asian-American population. American discrimination against Asian-Americans has not disappeared it has just been dormant and now it is widespread across the country and the world.


So now this hate has come out again in 2020 because of the coronavirus and people in America are using Asian-Americans as “scapegoats” as said in the HRW article. People are scared and afraid and many feel as though they have to blame someone and they have chosen Asian-Americans. Some Asian-Americans have been physically and verbally attacked during COVID times. In the CBS article and video, it is said that there were 2,100 hate incidents from March to June 2020. Many times those hate incidents included racial slurs and phrases relating to the coronavirus like “Chinese virus” and “Kung Flu”. These terms were actually popularized by the President so he was the one spreading hate and discrimination and created this underlying hate against Asian-Americans.


This isn’t just happening in America too, it is happening all around the world. As I learned in the HRW article, discrimination and xenophobia is happening all around the world like in the UK, Australia, Russia, etc. In the UK, “In early May, Sky News reported that data it had obtained through Freedom of Information requests to various regional UK police forces showed at least 267 anti-Asian hate crimes recorded across the country between January and March.”


Especially now in America, Asian-Americans are thought of as different than “real Americans” because as many attackers said to Asian-Americans, “Go back to China!”. But in reality, most of them grew up in America just like everyone else and are just as American as anyone else. Also, many victims of hate speech were told to go back to China when they are probably not even from China. Asian-Americans have confronted othering by explaining to people that they are born in America and explaining that they are the exact same as anyone else in this country, they just have a different heritage. Asians have also tried to stop people from assuming where they are from. In the Marshall Project article by Felix Sitthivong, he recalls his childhood and the discrimination he faced and how he is afraid for his children now with the hate and xenophobia that has been expressed through COVID. He remembers one time someone said “Go back to China” to him as a child and he just remembers being angry because his family was from Laos, not China, and he grew up in Seattle probably just like the kid. Asian-Americans are also reporting all these incidents to show the world how COVID has affected them in different ways than most.


As non-Asians, we need to recognize the xenophobia that has been exhibited in this country and we all need to publicly condemn it. We need to stop assuming where Asian-Americans are from and stop acting like they are any different than us because for all we know they could have grown up in the same way we did. It’s time to stop stereotyping them and start just seeing them as individuals instead of generalizing.


Do you believe that American children need more education on the history of Asian-Americans and unteach stereotypes because many children learn from the media and their parents and right now the media and the head of the country are saying things like “Kung Flu”?


SlothsPoopOnceAWeek
Chestnuthill, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 21

The Normalized Racism towards Asian Americans

While there has been an increase of hate towards Asians and Asian Americans in the United States, this has been present for a long time. Racism against Asians and Asian Americans has been very normalized in much of the United States, I am not able to speak for other countries. Especially since the very beginning of the corona virus, Asian Americans have been the target for blame and hate crimes, and what I found most shocking was that a lot of the hate was even happening before the country’s shut down in mid-March. Described in cartoons by Lisa Wool-Rim Sjoblom, a Korean-Sweedish cartoonist, there were people asking others to get off the train just because they were Eastern Asian. This started the #IAmNotAVirus movement on social media, a response to all of the hate and discrimination. As well as the movement, there was an incident-reporting center founded by the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council called STOP AAPI HATE. It has received more than 1800 reports of pandemic-fueled harassment and violence. In the article by Teen Vogue, one of the interns working for the youth campaign reported that after the use of ‘China Virus’ by our President Donald Trump, there was a spike in reports of hate and violence to Asian Americans. It is horrific to read how influential the hateful words of our President are, and are also used to excuse and normalize violence to Asian Americans. It leads to an increase of xenophobia, and in many articles, it all scares Asian Americans. They are scared of letting their grandparents out in fear that they will be harassed, and they are upset that people joke around with it. Many also said that growing up, xenophobia affected them and their friend’s mental healths, and that they felt as if they had to live up to the Asian stereotypes.


But discrimination in the United States towards Asians and Asian Americans has become more normalized than towards any other group, in my opinion. This could have all stemmed from the legal order of Executive Order 9066, which made some areas military zones in order to have internment camps. Despite being “loyal Americans,” as President General Ford later called them, Asian Americans, specifically Japanese Americans were sent to internment camps because they were deemed a threat during World War II. There was also the Chinese Exclusion Act passed in 1882, which allowed America to refuse immigrants on the base of race and ethnicity. Throughout history that has been not focused on much as it should have been, Asian Americans have been discriminated against for years, except it is normalized. There was also a narrative created that Asian Americans were the “ideal minority,” which was a narrative that downplayed racism that minorities face, as well as exclude Southeast Asians. This narrative was also made in order to pit minorities against each other.


Something that, non Asians, can do is step in when we see something happening and prevent from being a bystander. Also, more school-wide anti-bullying policies should be enforced, as a lot of children face xenophobia and racism at school. Many have also reported to experience online discrimination, which is something that could be changed within each school. Also, people have to learn more about “ethnic studies,” which could be implemented within curriculums to learn more about the history of each race and nation, and to develope empathy. The most important one is to step up for others when you see them being harassed, attacked, or discriminated against. Two voices is always more powerful than one, and could also give more comfort to the victim.


One question I have is, why are there so many bystanders in situations where they know something is wrong?

SlothsPoopOnceAWeek
Chestnuthill, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 21

I do believe we need to teach American children on the history of Asian-Americans and more about their cultures. Also, the stereotypes that many presume about Asian Americans needs to be untaught, as it all leads to hate towards them. These harmful words and stereotypes effect the mental health and lives of Asian Americans. I believe we need a good example for a leader who does not participate in such harmful acts, from calling COVID 19 the "China Virus" or "Kung Flu." While everyone has the freedom of speech, I also believe that media should not portray such harmful ideas of Asian Americans that add fuel to the present hate. On social media, I believe there should be restrictions on what people say regarding racism and xenophobia, and other slurs. No one should have to hear that. Parents also must teach their children to be kinder, and them themselves do the same.

Originally posted by razzledazzle8 on January 12, 2021 14:56

Xenophobia and discrimination against Asian-Americans have been in America ever since the 1800s. The most outstanding act of discrimination and racism in the 1800s was the “1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, which prevented Chinese laborers from immigrating to the United States”, which was spoken about in the UC Berkeley article by Ivan Natividad. A few examples of discrimination throughout history in America mentioned in the same article aren’t from that long ago, for example, “a federal law was passed in 2018 to restrict Chinese student and scholar immigration to America”. Also, this related to the film, Alternative Facts: The Lies of Executive Order 9066 because much like in World War 2 there are more lies being spread about Asian-Americans during COVID. For some reason, that history isn’t talked about often in history classes and I believe it is because America doesn’t want to own up to what they have done to the Asian-American population. American discrimination against Asian-Americans has not disappeared it has just been dormant and now it is widespread across the country and the world.


So now this hate has come out again in 2020 because of the coronavirus and people in America are using Asian-Americans as “scapegoats” as said in the HRW article. People are scared and afraid and many feel as though they have to blame someone and they have chosen Asian-Americans. Some Asian-Americans have been physically and verbally attacked during COVID times. In the CBS article and video, it is said that there were 2,100 hate incidents from March to June 2020. Many times those hate incidents included racial slurs and phrases relating to the coronavirus like “Chinese virus” and “Kung Flu”. These terms were actually popularized by the President so he was the one spreading hate and discrimination and created this underlying hate against Asian-Americans.


This isn’t just happening in America too, it is happening all around the world. As I learned in the HRW article, discrimination and xenophobia is happening all around the world like in the UK, Australia, Russia, etc. In the UK, “In early May, Sky News reported that data it had obtained through Freedom of Information requests to various regional UK police forces showed at least 267 anti-Asian hate crimes recorded across the country between January and March.”


Especially now in America, Asian-Americans are thought of as different than “real Americans” because as many attackers said to Asian-Americans, “Go back to China!”. But in reality, most of them grew up in America just like everyone else and are just as American as anyone else. Also, many victims of hate speech were told to go back to China when they are probably not even from China. Asian-Americans have confronted othering by explaining to people that they are born in America and explaining that they are the exact same as anyone else in this country, they just have a different heritage. Asians have also tried to stop people from assuming where they are from. In the Marshall Project article by Felix Sitthivong, he recalls his childhood and the discrimination he faced and how he is afraid for his children now with the hate and xenophobia that has been expressed through COVID. He remembers one time someone said “Go back to China” to him as a child and he just remembers being angry because his family was from Laos, not China, and he grew up in Seattle probably just like the kid. Asian-Americans are also reporting all these incidents to show the world how COVID has affected them in different ways than most.


As non-Asians, we need to recognize the xenophobia that has been exhibited in this country and we all need to publicly condemn it. We need to stop assuming where Asian-Americans are from and stop acting like they are any different than us because for all we know they could have grown up in the same way we did. It’s time to stop stereotyping them and start just seeing them as individuals instead of generalizing.


Do you believe that American children need more education on the history of Asian-Americans and unteach stereotypes because many children learn from the media and their parents and right now the media and the head of the country are saying things like “Kung Flu”?


Post your response here.

Wyverary
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 22

The Coronavirus and Xenophobia

First, to answer the previous poster’s question, I think bystanders don’t intervene due to a combination of apathy and their own racist sentiments. When these bystanders see anti-Asian attacks and do nothing, they are silently consenting to what is going on, and they know it. Additionally, many probably tell themselves that these attacks aren’t really attacks, and that intervening might be too risky - lies they tell themselves to do nothing about helping others.

I think that these anti-Asian attacks stem from the same hatred that is at the root of all forms of racism - lumping all people of other races into simple categories, so that all of them can be blamed for any kind of catastrophe. When Chinese and Japanese immigrants first came to the United States, as when almost every new wave of immigrants entered this country, they were promptly seen as a threat and the source of social ills such as unemployment. The tenuous position of recent immigrants makes them easy targets on which politicians can pin the blame for all of a country’s problems, as is evident from the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 to the present day “Muslim Ban”. Xenophobia in the United States has been much more extreme than just immigration bans, as evidenced by the internment camps into which Japanese-Americans were forced for the duration of World War II. Despite a complete lack of evidence that Japanese-Americans on the West Coast were colluding with enemy forces, other than the false evidence provided by General DeWitt’s utterly inept team of radio operators, officials used pre-existing anti-Asian sentiment to force the relocation of over 100,000 Japanese-Americans. Only in 1983 was the Supreme Court decision declaring this breach of freedom constitutional overturned.

The pandemic has unleashed a new wave of racism against Asian-Americans. Stop AAPI Hate has recorded 2,583 cases of racist incidents just from March 19 to August 5 of this year, according to Teen Vogue. Even more disturbingly, 1 in 7 of these incidents has been directed toward young people under the age of 20. In fact, in several locations young people were more likely to recieve racist insults, or worse, than adults. TIME’s article was further proof that these attacks are directly tied to ignorance and hate: several of the people interviewed were Korean-American or Japanese American, but still were the victims of unabashed racism. This article was especially powerful because it consisted of ten individual stories. From the owner of a Michelin-star restaurant which was vandalised to the woman who wore a hat to cover her black hair and sunglasses over her eyes, all of these Asian-Americans felt unsafe within their own city.

However, growing xenophobia is not just on the rise in the United States. Lisa Wool-Rim Sjöblom, a Korean-Swedish woman eventually moved out of Europe to New Zealand due to rising racism. She cites examples such as the growing power of a racist political party in Sweden, and the time her young son broke down at a London cafe, saying he wished he was white. The pandemic has only made things worse. In the United Kingdom, there have been many violent attacks on people of Asian descent, and government officials from the United States, Italy and several other countries have made openly discriminatory remarks about the link between China and the coronavirus. Other nations have used the pandemic as an excuse to attack other minorities such as Muslims, accusing them of spreading the virus in order to take away their rights.

In the United States, I think there needs to be a much bigger crackdown on these racist attacks. Rather than being dismissed as isolated incidents, they should be acknowledged for being as abhorrent as they are, and people need to face consequences for their actions. All Americans, no matter their race or ethnicity, deserve to live their lives without a fear of attack based on the way they look.

My question for the next person is: do you think that the Coronavirus pandemic has actually increased anti-Asian sentiments, or that it has only emboldened people who already held these racist beliefs?


broskiii
Charlestown, MA, US
Posts: 18

I'm not suprised.

This is not a surprise and nor should it be a surprise to anyone. As an Asian-American woman, I have seen countless of racist attacks because of Americans needing someone to blame for their own actions and it just so happens that Asians were scapegoats for the spread of COVID-19 cases. As we have seen before both in the movie, “Alternative Facts: The Lies of Executive Order 9066” and through the Chinese Exclusion Act, there was no evidence of Asians bringing in spies nor were they planning to “take over” the farming and mining business from white Americans at the time. There was no evidence of anything like that happening, and yet, white Americans decided to create a law that would ban a whole ethnicity because of the fear that they might “take over” the industries.

In the article by the Berkeley News, they talked about the relation to the present day anti-Asian xenophobia with the events of the Chinese Exclusion Act/the internment of over 110,000 Japanese-Americans, and how it is “rooted in decades of discriminatory and biased American...health and immigration policies that have targeted, and continue to target, immigrants from Asia because of the perceived threats they pose to America.” I completely agree with this statement because of the prime examples we see happening in our very own society right now. When we first discovered that Asians were considered “white” in the BPS system, I was very confused because given the history of Americans and Asians, I never thought that we would ever be grouped together, let alone be able to stand together and agree on anything. From the film we saw over the weekend, it is very apparent that the Japanese internment camps were founded on the basis of racist white Americans who were concerned that Japan would eventually dominate America. That is the kind of history that I am familiar with, not the ‘grouping under one racial umbrella to benefit both parties’ kind. Additionally, I’m glad that Korebashi finally got the justice he deserves and was able to change history, but I am still unsatisfied with the way Americans treat their minorities.

In the Teen Vogue article titled, “Anti-Asian Hate Has Surged During the Coronavirus Pandemic, Reports Find”, they mentioned that there is a website for Asian-Americans to voice their concerns about xenophobia in the U.S and what their opinions are on the topic. In just three months, there were 2,583 incidents of racist attacks (verbal or physical) happening in the U.S, and their main target were Asian-American youth. The article also stresses the importance of implementing more diverse studies into our curriculum rather than U.S history. As we have established before, American textbooks only show one side of the story, it is important to inform others about both sides before determining the verdict of whether or not someone is worth learning about. This is also why most non-Asians never hear about the Japanese internment camps or the abundance of Chinese miners arriving in San Francisco as often as Americans talk about their revolutionary war. Both events are important to know about, but only one is taught.

Furthermore, bigoted online comments not only spread lies about the cornonavirus but also hurt other Asian-Americans’ mental heath, so much so, that they fear their families going outside and potentially be attacked. Being scared of going outside is not a normal thing. Fearing for your safety or your families safety is not something that should be normalized in our society. Felix Sitthivong, an Asian-Amrican parent, expressed his concern for his son in the Marshall Project article titled, “Coronavirus Has Sparked Another Epidemic in My Prison: Anti-Asian Racism.” He mentioned towards the end of the article that these attacks brought him back to his childhood where the other children would harass him about his different background. He feared that this harassment would lead to something bigger and that it would also happen to his son. He expressed his emotions and the fear of knowing that his child might go through a racist attack one day. He says, “I wondered to myself if this was how generations of Black parents have felt when they had to have another version of "the talk" with their sons.” This quote is powerful because it gives us a glimpse into the fear of losing our children and how this “talk” is so normalized in the Black community.

In conclusion, I think that we all need to find a solution to combat these terrors and to hopefully find equality in our nation. In the CBS article titled, “2,120 Hate Incidents Against Asian Americans Reported During Coronavirus Pandemic,” they mentioned that by having government officials call it the “Chinese virus” and “Kung Flu,” more and more racist remarks started appearing. Many activist groups have contacted their governor to finally put an end to all this hate in our community. He supports the act of removing xenophobia from our nation, and we all should as well. From the movie and the lecture we heard in class, it is important to understand that racism can spark wars and murders, and the only way to combat these attacks is to understand that we all are equal, no matter where we come from. It would take many many years for us to get to that point, but I have hopes that we will eventually reach there someday.

In response to Wyverary’s question, I do think that the pandemic has definitely increased anti-Asian sentiments because of the abundance of responses to the anti-Asian hate crime website that Teen Vogue was talking about. Nevertheless, of course there are people who feel empowered to do so because of our President who publicly said a racist remark (“China virus”) against the Asian community. I think that by having a President, who is supposed to be respectful and be a role model for others, publicly say racist comments towards a minority, it gives other bigots power to do the same, resulting in more and more attacks each day.

My question for the next poster is: Why do you think that there are so few classes about diverse studies implemented in our BLS curriculum? Why is U.S history the one that we learn about the most?

PineappleMan30
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 14

Xenophobia in America

As unfortunate as it is, xenophobia is nothing new to the United States. Americans - more specifically, white Americans - have a tendency of generalizing every race they see. "All Asians look the same" is something that many Americans believe, though it is as we know, completely false in reality. The origins of the coronavirus had originated from Wuhan, China, and that alone was enough to increase the severity of xenophobia. In Suhauna Hussain's article about the videos from the LA Times, she describes that people are going to extremities, such as completely avoiding Asian people or putting false warnings on Asian food. Even UC Berkeley had said that xenophobia towards Asian people would be considered as a "normal reaction" now.

UC Berkeley also has it's own article about the relationship between coronavirus and xenophobia. Being deep rooted in America's past, racism towards Chinese people and generalizing all Asians is nothing new, and there was even an Exclusion Act in 1882, the first act that had involved an entire race. Xenophobia and fear of immigrants/immigration are closely related.

The return and reinforcement of racism towards Asians has come strong to 2020, as people are using Asians as "scapegoats" and as people to blame for their problems. People often look for ways to shift blame and in this case the blame lands solely on Asian-Americans. At least 2,100 hate crimes have occurred in the short period of time between March and June, and these include both physical and verbal assaults and attacks. President Donald Trump himself indulges this behavior, making it known he is just as xenophobic as so many Americans. He started calling the coronavirus the "Chinese-virus" and publicly blamed and shamed Asian-Americans. People even started avoiding Chinatowns across the US, afraid that they would get COVID by interacting or walking past someone who happens to be Asian. In Boston, Mayor (or now I guess Secretary of Labor) Martin Walsh attempted to disprove and diffuse these ideologies by going to Chinatown in the middle of the Coronavirus, eating at a restaurant and coming out the other end testing negative.

Racism is fluent in the blood of America, and if you didn't believe this before 2020 I'm sure you see it now. The occurrence of the Coronavirus has brought out the true nature of America and how much work we actually have to do. Not only did racism towards Black people become clearer, the coronavirus exposed the racism towards Asians as well. My question is, in what ways can Americans attempt to end xenophobia and the fear of getting COVID from specifically Asians?

beantown9
WEST ROXBURY, MA, US
Posts: 18

Xenophobia and the corona virus

Xenophobia has been seen for a while now and is nothing new to America. Americans and specifically white Americans tend to think and believe that "all Asians look the same", which is completely false in reality. We have seen Xenophobia everywhere from everyday life in our society to social media online. We have seen hate crimes against Asians, such as Asian people being verbally assaulted and even physically assaulted. I saw an example of a family getting verbally assaulted in the Los Angles times video "An epidemic of hate: anti-Asian hate crimes amid coronavirus". A family in Texas who are refugees from Burma were attacked for being perceived as Chinese and the person who attacked them told them "The coronavirus happens because of you". He then hit them in the head. John Lee, who made a song about the rise of Xenophobia made a good point about Xenophobia in his song. In his song, one of the lines was "paranoid and ignorance, dangerous combination". The coronavirus, which originated from Wuhan, China increased Xenophobia severity and it increased how much we see it. We have seen Xenophobia more often since the pandemic started. Even though it's happening (Currently) or at least has happened in the past year all throughout the world, Americans ignore that fact and just blame Asians for the virus. They only look at the part that it came from China, and think all Asians are responsible for it, which is false in reality. They also reemphasize "All Asians look the same because in these hate crimes, most of the incidents involved the victim being perceived as Chinese even if they weren't Chinese at all. I think we can stop Xenophobia by educating people on the origins of the coronavirus and telling people it's not okay to think all Asians look the same because it's not true in reality. In a Berkeley News article about Coronavirus and racism against Asians, Berkeley professor John A. Powell said “It’s an assumption that the West, particularly Anglo-American Christians, should dominate the world, so, somehow, Asians are seen as not real Americans and not to be trusted.” I think they are real Americans and deserve to be here. I think the rise of coronavirus and the pandemic made Americans to have beliefs like this one.

razzledazzle8
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 28

Originally posted by SlothsPoopOnceAWeek on January 12, 2021 16:53

While there has been an increase of hate towards Asians and Asian Americans in the United States, this has been present for a long time. Racism against Asians and Asian Americans has been very normalized in much of the United States, I am not able to speak for other countries. Especially since the very beginning of the corona virus, Asian Americans have been the target for blame and hate crimes, and what I found most shocking was that a lot of the hate was even happening before the country’s shut down in mid-March. Described in cartoons by Lisa Wool-Rim Sjoblom, a Korean-Sweedish cartoonist, there were people asking others to get off the train just because they were Eastern Asian. This started the #IAmNotAVirus movement on social media, a response to all of the hate and discrimination. As well as the movement, there was an incident-reporting center founded by the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council called STOP AAPI HATE. It has received more than 1800 reports of pandemic-fueled harassment and violence. In the article by Teen Vogue, one of the interns working for the youth campaign reported that after the use of ‘China Virus’ by our President Donald Trump, there was a spike in reports of hate and violence to Asian Americans. It is horrific to read how influential the hateful words of our President are, and are also used to excuse and normalize violence to Asian Americans. It leads to an increase of xenophobia, and in many articles, it all scares Asian Americans. They are scared of letting their grandparents out in fear that they will be harassed, and they are upset that people joke around with it. Many also said that growing up, xenophobia affected them and their friend’s mental healths, and that they felt as if they had to live up to the Asian stereotypes.


But discrimination in the United States towards Asians and Asian Americans has become more normalized than towards any other group, in my opinion. This could have all stemmed from the legal order of Executive Order 9066, which made some areas military zones in order to have internment camps. Despite being “loyal Americans,” as President General Ford later called them, Asian Americans, specifically Japanese Americans were sent to internment camps because they were deemed a threat during World War II. There was also the Chinese Exclusion Act passed in 1882, which allowed America to refuse immigrants on the base of race and ethnicity. Throughout history that has been not focused on much as it should have been, Asian Americans have been discriminated against for years, except it is normalized. There was also a narrative created that Asian Americans were the “ideal minority,” which was a narrative that downplayed racism that minorities face, as well as exclude Southeast Asians. This narrative was also made in order to pit minorities against each other.


Something that, non Asians, can do is step in when we see something happening and prevent from being a bystander. Also, more school-wide anti-bullying policies should be enforced, as a lot of children face xenophobia and racism at school. Many have also reported to experience online discrimination, which is something that could be changed within each school. Also, people have to learn more about “ethnic studies,” which could be implemented within curriculums to learn more about the history of each race and nation, and to develope empathy. The most important one is to step up for others when you see them being harassed, attacked, or discriminated against. Two voices is always more powerful than one, and could also give more comfort to the victim.


One question I have is, why are there so many bystanders in situations where they know something is wrong?

To answer SlothsPoopOnceAWeek's questions, I believe people don't think they are actually seeing racist attacks happening because they don't think it is as common as it is. Like Wyverary said, "many probably tell themselves that these attacks aren’t really attacks". Also people try to convince themselves that it is too dangerous to intervene in situations like that but they never seem to think of the safety of the victim. People try to say to themselves that it is none of their business but in reality it is their business because they are letting racism become normalized in their country. It is so disappointing that there are so many bystanders that don't confront attackers, I think if people started to fight back against this racism maybe people would start to condemn it rather than just watching it happen.

ilikekiwis
Boston, Massachusetts, US
Posts: 20

Originally posted by PineappleMan30 on January 13, 2021 11:37

My question is, in what ways can Americans attempt to end xenophobia and the fear of getting COVID from specifically Asians?

Post your response here.

Anti-Asian sentiment obviously did not begin with COVID. As tensions between Japan and the US mounted before World War II, Japanese-Americans were also thriving on the West Coast by cultivating farmland, previously seen as infertile. After Chinese immigrants were excluded from America in 1882, Japanese immigrants grew in population. White farmers were already holding very racist beliefs, jealous of Japanese farmers for doing better than them in farming. When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, this sentiment spread as military officials like Lieutenant General John DeWitt scrambled to make up any lie about the presence of suspicious and tratorious Japanese-Americans. DeWitt and his Chief of Staff, Karl Bendetson, claimed they didn’t have time to question individuals because of the threat from the Japanese, but they honestly didn’t care as long as Japanese-Americans were sent away. All Japanese-Americans were seen as suspicious “others” simply because of their ethnicity, regardless of citizenship. By creating false evidence of bombers over the West Coast and ship-to-shore radio communication, DeWitt and his team of racists were able to get Executive Order 9066 to be passed which called for the immediate evacuation of all Japanese-Americans to camps. This fear that originally started from jealous low-life farmers was amplified when military and government leaders shared the same racist sentiments. Once authority deems such behavior necessary, the public can go wild and decide who to regard as human beings or others.

This is very similar to President Trump’s grab for power, which unleashed thousands of rallies by Neo-Nazis and other racist extremist groups, now that racist rhetoric was deemed acceptable if the President could say such words and face no consequences. When Trump began calling COVID-19 the “China virus,” the rest of society which holds anti-Asian sentiments could make their strike against the Asian community, knowing they too would face little consequence. If governments don’t “expand public outreach, promote tolerance, and counter hate speech while aggressively investigating and prosecuting hate crimes,” as said by John Sifton, Asia Advocacy director, in the Human Rights Watch Article, “Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide,” racists have no filter on what they say. Society has grouped all Asians into one category of an enemy to be blamed for a tragedy. 80 years ago, it was Pearl Harbor. Now, it is coronavirus.

Such attacks range from physical and verbal abuse to gaslighting incidents all during people’s daily lives. As detailed in the CBSNews article, “2,120 hate incidents against Asian Americans reported during the coronavirus pandemic,” 2120 anti-Asian incidents occurred just between March and June of 2020. Since then, there have probably been thousands more. And these events tend to occur where Chinese populations are larger, such as California. It’s beyond unfortunate that cities and states deemed as liberal or welcoming to all still hold such racists. Asian victims and allies have spread awareness on the media in our age of technology in many forms: blogging, interviews, articles, videos, artwork, and more. Any victim of racist attacks, there is no way to confront the attacker up front because personal safety is most important. Unfortunately, reports to police usually result in little consequence for the perpetrators. Teens have been victims of attacks as well, as they were when sent to internment camps in the 1940s. According to Teen Vogue, 1 in 7 anti-Asian attacks on the basis of COVID-19 were against people under 20 years old, or teenagers. The only thing that teens can do is to speak up about experiences.

Korean-Swedish artist Lisa Wool-Rim Sjöblom, addressed an incident of gaslighting that occurred against her when a white woman subtly asked “shouldn’t [she] get off this tram,” by created a piece of art which gained viewers on social media through the hashtag, #iamnotavirus, as well as PBS NewsHour. Her artwork stands up against the othering of all Asians as the virus itself. Our job as allies of non-Asian descent is to amplify such stories in the media. Repost. Like. Retweet. Whatever the new terminologies are. In addition, we need to learn about the history of anti-Asian sentiment in the US as well as simply acknowledging that not all Asians look the same. You will not be asked on a pop quiz to identify every single Asian country in a series of pictures of people, but it is human decency to ask politely if you are curious about someone's culture. We need to speak up when we see something racist happening instead of being bystanders. This entails reporting posts on social media and reporting companies who create or have created racist advertisements or slogans.

To answer @PineappleMan30's question, America as a whole can probably never root out individual racists. We need to stop giving them a platform and to stop electing leaders who only encourage such behaviors. The government needs to do more to investigate hate crimes and spread information on the inability to contract COVID-19 from Asians in general.

My question is: Do you think that the increased use of technological platforms for opinion-giving has been overall negative or positive in relation to combatting anti-Asian sentiments?

alberic25
boston, massachusetts, US
Posts: 22

Xenophobia and Disease

America seems to ignore the problems and discrimination that Asian Americans experience. We like to rank and separate discrimination eventhough it is all part of a bigger problem, which is the straight up xenophobia that is tolerated and even sometimes encouraged in America. We like to blame our problems on other people because we think we are better than everyone else. Our own president publicly has said things against China that has encouraged further racism towards them. Calling the virus the “Kung Flu” and the “China Virus”, he places the blame for the disease on Chinese people, although in China they took care of the virus better than we did. Russel Jeung in the LA times video speaks on how when these issues were addressed Americans had a very “Us vs. them” view towards it. Trump says that Asian Americans deserve to be respected, however by doing so he separates America as a whole furthermore. He pins Asian Americans out as some kind of external force, separating them from the American identity. There has been a long history of hatred towards Asians in America, but this is something that is frequently looked past and marked as unimportant. Furthermore, on many forms and documents they consider Asians white. This really generalizes the whole race and takes away their identity as a whole.


The generalization of Asians is what leads to thoughts like “All Orientals Look the Same”. Asia is a big continent with many different cultures, however we group them all together and basically push them into a corner and silence them. Sjoblom says that with CoronaVirus Asians went from being invisible to being hypervisible. The discrimination towards Asian definitely was exposed with the virus. The Time article really exposed the crimes and discrimination that Asians have been facing. A lot of the stories have similar lines of people telling these Asian Americans to “go back to your country”. I think that a question that these people need to be asked is whos country is this really? Does it belong to the Native Americans that were pushed out and killed in masses? What makes an American an American? Asian Americans own this land just as much as the Europeans who colonized it.


America has a long history of rationalizing xenophobia with tragedies and COVID is a perfect example of this. If we continue this trend we’ll never really face our own problems. We need to educate more, especially on the history of Asian Americans because we have no excuse to hide the tortures and discriminations they’ve gone through and still go through to this day. Asian American history is American history too. Ignorance is the root of discrimination and it is really important to make sure that we know all the facts. COVID isn’t just a Chinese problem, but a GLOBAL problem that we need to work together to fix because pointing fingers is doing nothing for us but causing more pain and suffering for our own American citizens.


To answer ilikekiwis question on technological platforms and their effects on Anti-asian sentiments I believe that they are both positively and negatively affecting us. Depending on what kind of person you are, you are going to see different sides of the story. On one hand people like Trump and other sources are spreading ideas that simply blame covid on China and thus target Asian Americans. However the media alway informs us about the prejudice and we can hear first account stories of whats going on.

My question is: Why do people (Americans) rationalize their xenophobia through tragedies like COVID?

butterfly123
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 19

Xenophobia in the United States Is Nothing New

The United States has a long history of racism and discrimination towards Asian people. From the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, to the Japanese internment camps, to the current attacks and hate crimes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, xenophobia and racism are not new concepts in this country. In the UC Berkeley article by Ivan Natividad, he points out that immigrants from Asia are repeatedly targeted “because of the perceived threats they pose to America’s dominance domestically and abroad.” He goes on to discuss how China has recently become a stronger country, increasing the competition and endangering the established American dominance. Since it has been proven by health experts that people of Asian descent are no more susceptible to the virus than others, there are no logical reasons for the events that have occurred. Yet our own government has “directly or indirectly encouraged hate crimes, racism, or xenophobia by using anti-Chinese rhetoric,” as stated by Human Rights Watch.


Coronavirus has been used as an excuse and a justification for expressing blatant racism against Asian people that has been prevalent in the US for centuries. The parallels between the current situation and the Japanese internment camps during World War 2 are abundant. In both situations, worldwide events were used as rationalization to discriminate against people of Asian descent despite evidence suggesting that they had no connection to the event. There was no evidence that Japanese Americans on the West Coast were in contact with the Japanese armies, and zero proven cases of Japanese Americans committing espionage. However executive order 9066 called for the internment of Japanese Americans anyways. In 2020-2021, Chinese people, as well as all Asians have been discriminated against and even physically harmed just because the virus began in China, even though it could have started anywhere.


Non-Asians have a responsibility to not be bystanders, and educate others whenever possible. Calling out racism and ignorance is increasingly important to stop these events from happening. Being an ally means speaking up when other people say or do things that are harmful to others, and educating that person on why their actions are incorrect and destructive. It is also important for schools to educate children about the history or racism towards Asians in the US since it is often overlooked in curriculums. It is essential to teach children about all of the unique cultures, countries, and groups of people in Asia since generalizations can be very harmful.


To answer @alberic25’s question, people are constantly looking for justifications of their contorted views. Tragedies such as COVID are used as scapegoats for xenophobia, since there are no logical rationales for those perspectives. There is no reason to discriminate against immigrants, or people of Asian descent, yet many people fear differences, and that fear often causes hatred and unjustifiable animosity. COVID is an excuse to voice xenophobic views that had already been formed similarly to how World War 2 was an excuse to imprison Japanese Americans.

My question is: How much of an influence do you think Trump’s rhetoric had on the hate crimes and discrimination against Asians in the United States?

239bid0073
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 21

"Us" vs. "They"

To first answer the question of ilikekiwi’s, yes, I do believe that social media has amplified and spread xenophobia. Just like it has everything social media spreads content at a rapid rate. It is one of the few things that does not discriminate. Whether the content is good or bad it is going to be spread rapidly. This is definitely one of the pieces of content I wish wasn’t spread but, if it is on social media it is inevitably going to reach the masses. I think racism and discrimination have spread and this has provoked even more racism. But, it is not to say that because more people are becoming aware of what is actually happening it can also help to incite change. Many people seeing the xenophobia online can help to actually create change within a community and make everyone more aware.

While Xenophobia is prominent online it is widely seen in schools. Some schools are welcoming kids back for the first time since March, and this has led to a rise in xenophobia directed towards students within the schools. As Teen Vogue stated, Young Asian American people (under the age of 20) are most likely to experience Xenophobia. Much of this takes place in or around school buildings, online, and in public places like parks. If this is mostly happening in schools then that most likely means these acts of xenophobia are being carried out by other students. This poses another big question. Where are young people being influenced by racism and discrimination? Where are they learning these things and being told that it is okay to spread them?

Xenophobia is deeply rooted in American history. Ever since 1800, when the first Asians immigrated here, they have been depicted as “savage disease-ridden people” (Teen Vogue). The government has never been on the side to support Asian Americans, and as Human Rights Watch points out, the US among other countries is using the Coronavirus to advance “ anti-immigrant, white-supremacist, anti-Semitic, and ultra-nationalist movements”. This is something that is so horrifying because it means no real change can ever be enacted. While civilians can and should do all that they are capable of to combat xenophobia until laws and policies are put in place no change is ever going to come about. If lawmakers and the government are not on the side of combating this, then nothing can ever be done.

Not only are leading officials of this country not doing anything but, the FBI according to the LA Times is merely warning people that the hate crimes could get worse and to expect an increase. Shouldn’t the nation’s security protect the people and be able to tell them they are working towards a decrease rather than to expect an increase. It is all very frightening. Not to mention that as CBS News pointed out Asian-American businesses are failing. People are fearing to go eat at Asian restaurants, even though the CDC said Asian Americans are not more likely to contract or spread coronavirus. Because of the lack of business many places are closing, and won’t be able to reopen when vaccination is available to all.

Coronavirus has brought to the surface the racism, discrimination, and xenophobia that has been in this country since 1800. One thing that all articles mentioned to help combat this is to have a more diverse curriculum. This would mean teaching about the histories of all people, even the history that is hard to face sometimes. But until the government no longer looks at Asian Americans through the lens of “us” vs. “they”, nothing is going to change. They have to be accepted as Americans because after all, they are, and they deserve to be treated with the same level of respect.

My question for you is what do you think it will take to get policymakers to recognize xenophobia and do something about it?

soleilmagic
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 17

Xenophobia is Response to Covid

To answer a previous poster’s question, on whether I believe that American children need more education on the history of Asian-Americans and unteach stereotypes because many children learn from the media and their parents and right now the media and the head of the country are saying things like “Kung Flu”? Yes I do believe that all children need more education on the history of all races and cultures along with getting rid of common stereotypes that have been in place forever. It’s a new generation, why not forgot the hatred of the past and finally teach the fact that everyone is equal and no one should be discriminated against.

The hatred and resentment towards Asians and Asian Americans has been prevalent for a long time but has increased recently especially with the pandemic. America’s own president has referred to it as the “China virus” or the “Asian flu” just because the first known case was in Wuhan, China. In an article from Berkeley News titled, “Coronavirus: Fear of Asians rooted in long American history of prejudicial policies,” by Ivan Natividad, a great point was made, “This anti-Asian xenophobia has a history rooted in decades of discriminatory and biased American public health and immigration policies that have targeted, and continue to target, immigrants from Asia because of the perceived threats they pose to America’s dominance domestically and abroad, according to two UC Berkeley experts who have studied the history of race in America.” Xenophobia is not only on the rise in the US, in a Human Rights Watch article titled, “Covid-19 Fueling Anti-Asian Racism and Xenophobia Worldwide” it was stated that, “In the UK, Asian people have been punched in the face and taunted, accused of spreading coronavirus. Two women attacked Chinese students in Australia, punching and kicking one and yelling “Go back to China” and “you fucking immigrants.” Two men attacked a Chinese-American in Spain and beat him so badly that he was in a coma for two days. A man with a knife attacked a Burmese family in Texas. In Africa, there have been reports of discrimination and attacks on Asian people accused of carrying coronavirus, as well as foreigners generally, including in Kenya, Ethiopia, and South Africa. In Brazil, the media have reported harassment and shunning of people of Asian descent.” 9 countries listed in just those two paragraphs and that is only a small portion of the reality of it.

Throughout history the treatment of Asian Americans has been not focused on much as it should have been, they have been discriminated against for years, and it is normalized. The stereotypes that many presume about Asian Americans needs to be untaught, as it all leads to hate towards them. And this pandemic has unleashed a new unimaginable wave of racism against Asian-Americans. Overall, we need to find a solution towards this blatant racism and find equality in not only our nation but also the world. It’s sad that a pandemic brought out the true nature of the world.

My question is, excluding the facing history class, what other classes should we implement the topic of diverse studies at BLS, and why hasn’t it been implemented to begin with?


mcsd153
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 21

Overlooked Asian American Racism in America

The racism and xenophobia against Asian Americans that we have been seeing for almost a year now during the coronavirus pandemic is unfortunately nothing new. America is built on the hatred that is cloaked by pride and “patriotism”. Events like the Chinese Exclusion Act of 882, Executive Order 9066 in 1942, and most recently the spread of racist rhetoric or actions amid the Coronavirus pandemic are examples of this. When the topic of racism is brought up, many first jump to the thought of black vs. white, which is not wrong, but we often turn a blind eye to the discrimination and xenophobia faced by Asian people in this country. The phrase “All Asians look the same” is thrown around so inconsequentially. Many people even think that Asians experience “good” racism since they have stereotypes of being good at math or being very polite. There is no “good” racism. It is just blatant ignorance and discrimination. The idea of racism faced by Asians being “not as bad” as the racism faced by other races is very harmful. There is no better or worse when it comes to hatred.

The origins of this xenophobia are in the 1800s roughly. The Chinese Exclusion Act was passed in 1882 and banned the immigration of Chinese people into the United States. While this may sound shocking (not really…. It's America were talking about here), this is very similar to the travel ban President Trump imposed in early 2017 in which he banned 7 predominantly Muslim countries from traveling to the United States, in hopes to protect the U.S. from terrorism. This racism is also evident in Executive Order 9066, which resulted in over 100 thousand Japanese Americans being put in internment camps throughout the U.S. The U.S. government deemed them a “threat to national security” during WWII, which caused public distrust and fear of Asian Americans. There was no actual evidence of Japanese Americans being spies and this was just a form of fear-mongering in my opinion. This all stemmed from Japanese farmers cultivating what was thought to be unusable arid land into fruitful crops. American farmers took this as a huge blow to their ego, and it caused racial tensions. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, America did everything it could to demonize Japanese Americans and create public distrust. As Ivan Natividad says in Berkeley News, “This anti-Asian xenophobia has a history rooted in decades of discriminatory and biased American public health and immigration policies that have targeted, and continue to target, immigrants from Asia because of the perceived threats they pose to America’s dominance domestically and abroad.” I'd like to add some emphasis on “dominance”. This is a recurring theme in the history of the United States. If we see another race or country as a threat to our fragile ego, we fear monger and make sure that it is as difficult as possible for them to succeed in our so-called “land of the free”.

Thus, Asian people became the “others''. There was America and there was “them”. This led people to more and more often to use Asian Americans as scapegoats. It is much easier to blame the problem on “them”, rather than take accountability for our actions. This has also led to diminishing the importance of Asian culture and heritage. As seen in the example of the Boston School Committee, AAPI are often lumped into this group of “others” or grouped in with white people, as if they can just be tossed around. We do not learn nearly enough Asian history in school, which leads to lots of misinformation. As I said before, many believe Asian people experience “good” racism, full of stereotypes and stigmas. While that does happen, it is simply untrue that it is the entirety of what Asian Americans face. If we were taught more about the history of Asian discrimination, injustice, and racism in school, maybe this would not be such a common misconception.

While the coronavirus should not have had to happen for people to begin paying attention to the racism faced by Asian Americans, it did. With President Trump fueling the “us vs them” rhetoric, labeling it the “China virus”, hatred and discrimination against Asian Americans surged. As Sara Li highlights in her Teen Vogue article, “Stop AAPI (Asian American and Pacific Islander) Hate recorded 2,583 [incidents of discrimination and racism] across the U.S between March 19 and August 5, 2020. One in seven of these attacks were directed against young people under 20 years old (14%).” She also highlights how “harassment is primarily focused on blaming China and Chinese people as the source of the virus and mocking Chinese dietary habits”. This is something I have seen as well. I have seen videos of people screaming at Asian people that this virus was their fault, or mocking them while walking down the street. In a Los Angeles Times video on anti-Asian hate crimes amid the coronavirus, Rick Lee recounts how he was filming a music video for his song, coincidentally about xenophobia during the pandemic, and people came up to him then spit, coughed, and pointed at him. Russel Jeung from the Stop AAPI Hate reporting center also emphasized just how common these attacks are.

What came as a shock to me was just how common this racism is in other places around the world. In the Article by Human Rights Watch, this same disgusting discrimination against Asian Americans amidst this pandemic is discussed. The Governor of Veneto in Italy said they would be better at handling the coronavirus because they have a “culturally strong attention to hygiene, washing hands, taking showers, whereas we have all seen the Chinese eating mice alive.” This racism is mirrored in places like the U.K., where Asian people are told to go back to their country or are assaulted while walking down the street. It is everywhere. John Sifton, an Asia advocacy director says “racism and physical attacks on Asians and people of Asian descent have spread with the Covid-19 pandemic, and government leaders need to act decisively to address the trend.”

It will be difficult to deconstruct the bias and racism surrounding Asian Americans, but it must be done. This starts with allyship and fighting for change. Simple ways to do this could be standing up if you see a discriminatory post, action, or maybe even assault. Being a bystander is the worst thing to do in this situation. I agree with broskiii when they mentioned how after Trump using terms like “the Chinese Virus” and “Kung Flu”, more racist remarks began to circulate. Many think that if the president can get away with it, they can too. We need to educate both ourselves and those around us about why those terms hold so much ignorance and address where that bias comes from. From the movie “Alternative Facts: The Lies of Executive Order 9066”, or discussion in class, and the articles I read, I have taken away how overlooked the history of Asian Americans in this country is. With phrases like “All Asians look the same” and slurs being so commonplace in our society, people often forget how much weight they actually hold. I would like to blame our education system in part for not teaching us more, but some of it is just plain ignorance. We cannot blame an entire virus on a group of people, many of whom are not even from Wuhan (it is not their “fault” either, no one wanted or planned for this to happen). If we hear friends or family members blame this pandemic on Chinese people or even all Asians, remind them how ignorant that is, and educate them. We can fight this hate.

To answer soleilmagic’s question, I think we should be implementing this in classes like humanities, and all history classes that we take. This should not be so looked over in the BLS community. We have an obligation as members of this community to be well-informed and fight discrimination in every way we can. We can only do this if we are given the resources to learn from. This stuff should already be in history courses (in-depth), and I honestly can't find an answer to why it isn't already. Our curriculums need to be constantly changing and updated as the world around us shifts. I think in addition to this we could add an Asian American history course at BLS as an elective just like there is African American studies. I think it would be a great addition to our school and help keep us educated on these very important topics.

My question is, what biases and/or discriminatory acts against Asian Americans have you either experienced or witnessed or heard/seen? Did anyone do anything to stop it?

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