posts 31 - 37 of 37
Lobster9
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 11

Choices all Around Us

Judgement and discrimination is comes naturally to people. As we have grown up we've been taught to judge in every aspect of our lives, whether it be about who we want to be friends with or what restaurant you want to eat at. I do not think that judgement is necessarily a bad thing but it can be taken too far when you begin to judge people solely based on assumptions. I think that you should give everyone a chance when you meet them and try not to let your preconceptions about them get in the way of what you actually learn about them. As Americans we have been choosing all of our lives, everything we do has many options. At the grocery store there's about 15 different kinds of milk to choose from, at one point in your life choosing becomes natural and you learn to live off of your instinct. I do not think that choice is inherently good or bad, but depending on what kind of choices you make they could have negative consequences. As mentioned in the Sheena Iyenger TED talk people in other countries don't have the same views on choice as we Americans do. I think some of this depends on what you are used to, if you only are given 1 option you might not think about the choices that you could be making because they have been predetermined for you. It's like the saying “what you dont know cant hurt you” if you don't know that other choices are available to people in a similar situation you will not feel like you are missing out on an opportunity, but if you have been accustomed to choice all your life and now suddenly those choices are taken away you will miss the time when you were able to choose.


In a society there are many roles for choices. In America particularly, political and economic choices are at the forefront of society's mind. People on different sides of the political scale have made choices to get them there. All though they have been given similar options they have chosen differently based on their personal experience and preferences. America seems to be divided by these choices and it makes me wonder what would happen if we did not have those choices. Would the country feel so divided or would we be able to come together? I do think choices are essential to making society run because without them we would have no individuality and people would become too similar. Variety in choices have created the complex and diverse society that we live in today, without those choices who knows what society would look like. Although judgement and discrimination are not the most positive things I do not think the world can exist with out them. There is a strange balance between the world based on the way that we all judge each other and without that balance the world would be totally different.


In response to @greenbeans question The last time I remember making a serious judgement or choice was right before election day. My family has different political views than I, especially my extended family. It can be awkward at times when their views contradict with mine. I decided to speak up against my conservative uncle because I disagreed with his views and I made a serious judgement on him based on his political views. Normally I have to let some things that he says go because him and some other family members brush off my views as being those of a child who still doesn't understand enough to form an opinion. Even though this was a difficult judgement to make against my own family member it was important for me to do so.


My question is: How would you feel if some simple choices that you make every day were taken away? Would you miss those choices or be glad that you have less things to worry about?


pizza
Posts: 13

We + They = Us

When it comes to natural instincts, I think it is fair to say that discrimination and judgement would always happen when we are making choices. There is no need to do so, but sometimes judging or discriminating people can be helpful if there is no trust in a newly established relationship. However, I think it is always important to look for the good in people. Judging people based on their looks, their race, their socio-economic status is pretty sad and unnecessary, but on the other hand, people who are aware about one’s misfortunes can use those judgements to be more aware of how they treat one another. While it is impossible for people to just meet someone new without doing a full evaluation, it is important to understand that those judgements should be kept within themselves, rather than saying it to the public. A society can never be perfect, and judgement and discrimination is something that people need to learn from (and not necessarily something to overlook).

Now after the results of the 2020 election, there is no certain future for the United States because we, as Americans, settled for Biden, hoping for a revived country. From what I have noticed, voting in 2020 is a vote for less discrimination, for women’s rights, for the LGTBQ+ community, and for minorities. Even though we have elected a president who is somewhat more understanding of the majority, it does not mean all the wrong ideals that Trump has amplified during his presidency is going to be gone. In Garza’s podcast, she says, “But the reality is, white supremacy can be carried out by black people, it can be carried out by women. It's not just identity in and of itself that changes the ways that politics happens.” It’s really interesting to hear/read that since a lot of politicians use the tactic to act as if they are an ally to a certain group of people to redeem likability points and whatnot. I am hopeful that the future will lead to discussions and an early understanding in the school systems of what this election actually means for those groups of people. Like in Powell’s article, we have to move towards a society that is the opposite of othering: belonging. A lot of these steps require acknowledging the problems that are ingrained into our societies, but I think having people (who we look up to) to step forward and open these uncomfortable topics is really influential.

In response to @20469154661, I think a colorblind society (referred from @madagascar) would be more harmful to our current society because in the United States, the beauty of it is the diversity. If we look away from what society is built from (the racism, the battles that people took to fight for justice, and how we moved past those imperfections), then it feels like a forced and ignorant society.

My lingering question is: how do we start a conversation where it can include people who completely refuse to acknowledge the problems happening around them?

the negotiator
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 13

The Nature of Choice

I think that it is natural for people to make judgements and discriminations, and that they are necessary for a society to function. In class when we were voting for which pepper we liked the most, I understood the underlying message, as I’m sure others did as well, but none of us saw it as discriminating and thought of it more as just a playful exercise because of the fact that there were no consequences for picking a certain pepper over the rest. However, when we parallel this to something on a much broader scale, like different people, we really shouldn’t be judging based on appearance, but we do every day. Whether we like it or not we judge others on how they present themselves. This is when problems begin to arise.


After having read “Us vs them: the sinister techniques of ‘Othering’ – and how to avoid them” by John A. Powell, I feel that the term othering really is the perfect description of what was being described throughout the article. Othering happens all around us. In short, its the process of singling out a group of people and presenting them as different, in a negative way, whether it be consciously or unconsciously. Most of our assumptions about certain groups are presented via the media and politicians. It is said in the article that Othering shows up in power structures and it is concerning “how it is used to divide and dehumanize groups, and capture and reshape government and institutions.” We often take what the media and politicians say, and either make our own views from it, or just listen and agree, which I believe is a toxic way of forming one’s opinions, because you should be actively trying to form your own more educated opinions rather than just listening to what you are told and going with it. That is what the politicians want you to do, but we must not stray away from our outstanding right that is the right to make our own choices.


The idea of choice brings us to Sheena Iyengar’s Ted Talk titled “The art of choosing.” For me, this video really brought light to the fact that we are so fortunate to be able to make our own choices here in America, but I also thought it was interesting how some thought it could at some points be detrimental. Some people believe we have too much choice such as in the soda experiment, or the one man who said there are too many choices for gum. What really stood out to me though was the discussion of choice to remain on life support. Many Americans said that they were glad that the choice was in their hands rather than the doctor’s, but that they were still left with immense guilt for their choice no matter what they picked. I thought that a very interesting point was brought up when Sheena Iyengar said “Americans train their whole lives to spot the difference.” Our entire lives we have been making discriminations whether we like it or not. We discern certain things we like better than others and it instills in us that this is ok when in reality it is not. For certain things like toys when we are growing up, yes, it is ok to pick favorites, but when we are talking about actual human beings, we cannot make negative discriminations. We must acknowledge that we are all different, but not treat one another differently or with different amounts of respect based on certain categories that we fall into.


My Question: How would our world function if no one acknowledged the differences between others and themselves? What positive and negative consequences might this bring about?

the negotiator
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 13

Originally posted by pizza on November 12, 2020 07:45

My lingering question is: how do we start a conversation where it can include people who completely refuse to acknowledge the problems happening around them? Is

I'm not sure if you finished your question completely, but if people refuse to acknowledge what is going on around them, this shows disgusting ignorance and huge amounts of privilege. To know that these issues don't affect yourself and then just disregard them is awful to me. In my opinion, it is a persons right and obligation to be involved in politics and social injustices. In terms of starting a conversation, keep bringing the issues up with these types of people until they finally speak up.

Heyo8
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 11

Society's freedoms and reprecussions

Discrimination and judging others is natural to everyone. Every person has their biases and prejudices. The real issue with discrimination is when it indirectly or directly causes harm towards others. In America the outlet for voices is politics. Being a democracy the foundation on which America was founded, opinions are to be expected. Issues are solved by the government by popular opinions on what to do. On a political level, voting is where voices and opinions are heard and in order for it to be the least harmful, everyone’s voices must be heard. On a social level though, things become much more intricate. When people think of discrimination, “racism” comes right after in some way shape or form. Racism and discrimination has come to the forefront of America’s attention this year. The Black Lives Matter movement has exposed some forms of discrimination and racism that have been buried or tabooed for decades. The protests have led people, including myself to further educate myself on racism in the United States. I found a common denominator in most. And that is either the lack of education or the failure to accept education. Many are ignorant to issues and the reasons behind people of color are protesting. Others refuse to accept the fact that they may be wrong. This is a reason why discrimination is still persistent in American society. We must reverse this. We must be open to the fact that we may be wrong and hear people and discuss. We cannot stop fighting and educating ourselves and others to rectify what was wrong in this society. Choices are an American freedom. As Sheena Iyengar said in her Ted Talk, "No Matter where we're from and what your narrative is, we all have a responsibility to open ourselves up to a wider array of what choices can do." Choosing to do what hurts others is a choice. Choosing to help is a choice. It is all up to you. No one can take your choice from you.


In response to @Lobster9’s question, I would despise my choices getting taken away from me. I understand and appreciate some of my choices being made for me as a child because I was developing my own identity and was still dependent. Now, I feel as though I have grown out of that phase. I can think and form my own opinions now. I wish to live my life by my choice. That is how I won't have regrets. I have found that some of my most regretted choices have been my choice to listen to others but not myself.


My question is: If basic everyday choices were taken from you and everything was set out for your life, you’d just need to live it..Would you be okay and cruise through that life or would you fight for your own life, though it may be harder?

sizzles
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 11

Choices

Originally posted by Lobster9 on November 12, 2020 07:39

Judgement and discrimination is comes naturally to people. As we have grown up we've been taught to judge in every aspect of our lives, whether it be about who we want to be friends with or what restaurant you want to eat at. I do not think that judgement is necessarily a bad thing but it can be taken too far when you begin to judge people solely based on assumptions. I think that you should give everyone a chance when you meet them and try not to let your preconceptions about them get in the way of what you actually learn about them. As Americans we have been choosing all of our lives, everything we do has many options. At the grocery store there's about 15 different kinds of milk to choose from, at one point in your life choosing becomes natural and you learn to live off of your instinct. I do not think that choice is inherently good or bad, but depending on what kind of choices you make they could have negative consequences. As mentioned in the Sheena Iyenger TED talk people in other countries don't have the same views on choice as we Americans do. I think some of this depends on what you are used to, if you only are given 1 option you might not think about the choices that you could be making because they have been predetermined for you. It's like the saying “what you dont know cant hurt you” if you don't know that other choices are available to people in a similar situation you will not feel like you are missing out on an opportunity, but if you have been accustomed to choice all your life and now suddenly those choices are taken away you will miss the time when you were able to choose.


In a society there are many roles for choices. In America particularly, political and economic choices are at the forefront of society's mind. People on different sides of the political scale have made choices to get them there. All though they have been given similar options they have chosen differently based on their personal experience and preferences. America seems to be divided by these choices and it makes me wonder what would happen if we did not have those choices. Would the country feel so divided or would we be able to come together? I do think choices are essential to making society run because without them we would have no individuality and people would become too similar. Variety in choices have created the complex and diverse society that we live in today, without those choices who knows what society would look like. Although judgement and discrimination are not the most positive things I do not think the world can exist with out them. There is a strange balance between the world based on the way that we all judge each other and without that balance the world would be totally different.


In response to @greenbeans question The last time I remember making a serious judgement or choice was right before election day. My family has different political views than I, especially my extended family. It can be awkward at times when their views contradict with mine. I decided to speak up against my conservative uncle because I disagreed with his views and I made a serious judgement on him based on his political views. Normally I have to let some things that he says go because him and some other family members brush off my views as being those of a child who still doesn't understand enough to form an opinion. Even though this was a difficult judgement to make against my own family member it was important for me to do so.


My question is: How would you feel if some simple choices that you make every day were taken away? Would you miss those choices or be glad that you have less things to worry about?


@Lobster9 I find life's beauty in the fact that we do have choices, and have the ability to alter our realities to our preferences/needs. Preferences were born out of series of discriminations, and somewhat command our future choices. For this reason, I believe that natural discrimination is innate. Our biochemistry, our memories, and our current situations all play a role in our decisions. However, I don't think racial prejudice is inevitable. If you met a hermit who had never experienced life in a societal context (or consumed any forms of media), that person would not have any biases whatsoever. By living in a society, we agree (consciously and subconsciously), to its ideals which are perpetuated through the media.

sizzles
Boston, MA, US
Posts: 11

cont.

Originally posted by sizzles on November 13, 2020 01:03

Originally posted by Lobster9 on November 12, 2020 07:39

Judgement and discrimination is comes naturally to people. As we have grown up we've been taught to judge in every aspect of our lives, whether it be about who we want to be friends with or what restaurant you want to eat at. I do not think that judgement is necessarily a bad thing but it can be taken too far when you begin to judge people solely based on assumptions. I think that you should give everyone a chance when you meet them and try not to let your preconceptions about them get in the way of what you actually learn about them. As Americans we have been choosing all of our lives, everything we do has many options. At the grocery store there's about 15 different kinds of milk to choose from, at one point in your life choosing becomes natural and you learn to live off of your instinct. I do not think that choice is inherently good or bad, but depending on what kind of choices you make they could have negative consequences. As mentioned in the Sheena Iyenger TED talk people in other countries don't have the same views on choice as we Americans do. I think some of this depends on what you are used to, if you only are given 1 option you might not think about the choices that you could be making because they have been predetermined for you. It's like the saying “what you dont know cant hurt you” if you don't know that other choices are available to people in a similar situation you will not feel like you are missing out on an opportunity, but if you have been accustomed to choice all your life and now suddenly those choices are taken away you will miss the time when you were able to choose.


In a society there are many roles for choices. In America particularly, political and economic choices are at the forefront of society's mind. People on different sides of the political scale have made choices to get them there. All though they have been given similar options they have chosen differently based on their personal experience and preferences. America seems to be divided by these choices and it makes me wonder what would happen if we did not have those choices. Would the country feel so divided or would we be able to come together? I do think choices are essential to making society run because without them we would have no individuality and people would become too similar. Variety in choices have created the complex and diverse society that we live in today, without those choices who knows what society would look like. Although judgement and discrimination are not the most positive things I do not think the world can exist with out them. There is a strange balance between the world based on the way that we all judge each other and without that balance the world would be totally different.


In response to @greenbeans question The last time I remember making a serious judgement or choice was right before election day. My family has different political views than I, especially my extended family. It can be awkward at times when their views contradict with mine. I decided to speak up against my conservative uncle because I disagreed with his views and I made a serious judgement on him based on his political views. Normally I have to let some things that he says go because him and some other family members brush off my views as being those of a child who still doesn't understand enough to form an opinion. Even though this was a difficult judgement to make against my own family member it was important for me to do so.


My question is: How would you feel if some simple choices that you make every day were taken away? Would you miss those choices or be glad that you have less things to worry about?


@Lobster9 I find life's beauty in the fact that we do have choices, and have the ability to alter our realities to our preferences/needs. Preferences were born out of series of discriminations, and somewhat command our future choices. For this reason, I believe that natural discrimination is innate. Our biochemistry, our memories, and our current situations all play a role in our decisions. However, I don't think racial prejudice is inevitable. If you met a hermit who had never experienced life in a societal context (or consumed any forms of media), that person would not have any biases whatsoever. By living in a society, we agree (consciously and subconsciously), to its ideals which are perpetuated through the media.

However, back to the original subject of choice, I think it's necessary for us to have options presented to us in an unbiased manner so that we can select the items that will be of greatest use.

posts 31 - 37 of 37