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freemanjud
Posts: 70

Watching: Sheena Iyenger, professor at Columbia Business School “TED talk: On the Art of Choosing” (2014) (24:08)


Today in class, we evaluated, judged and chose a preferred pepper. (NB: yes, this is a history class. We just go about it in a slightly unconventional manner.) An interesting (and often hilarious) exercise, don’t you think?


In reality, we choose all the time. In order to choose, we discriminate (that’s the evaluation piece). First we decide if one thing(s) is different—and then better than another; then we decide which is our preference—and in this case, which was “the best.”


To “choose,” we judge one another, we judge fruits and veggies in a supermarket, trying to determine (the verdict) which one to purchase. We judge people by what they wear and how they smell; we judge what looks "good" when we try on clothes, we judge whether one school is better than another. And then we choose.


We too are judged. Others judge us. They size us up—that’s the discrimination part. They assess who we are and then they draw conclusions (that’s the judgment or the verdict part). Institutions judge us, law enforcement judges us, teachers judge us, our supervisors judge us, some believe that a God judges us. Many factors feed those judgments. Stereotypes play a role. So do preconceptions. So does compassion. So does objectivity. And if someone demands that we make a choice, based on these judgments, well, we usually do!


Judgment and choice imply a sense of ranking. Something is better than something else. Generally, judgment and choice involve a kind of opposition: this is good (or better), while this is bad (or not as good). Inevitably this is a kind of “othering”: the recognition that there is an “us” (usually good) and “them” (usually not-so-good….or bad).


Think about discrimination, judgment, and choice-making for a moment. Must we discriminate among things/people? Must we judge? What’s the point of judgment? Must we choose? Are these good or bad things or somewhere in between? Are there roles for choices in society? Are they essential to making society function?

Is it possible for a world to exist without discrimination? Without judgment?


Consider these myriad but interrelated issues and then write a thoughtful post taking a position on these questions. Be sure to respond to the comments of those who precede you in this discussion.And be certain to support what you say with some concrete examples and/or anecdotes, including an assessment of the exercise in class and the TED talk by Sheena Iyenger (the world’s so-called foremost expert on choices).

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guardianangel
Posts: 15

Keep It to Yourself

I believe that discrimination is an innate instinct we have as humans. To be understand, we make the choice to categorize people in our lives. It isn't necessarily a bad thing, unless you discriminate by your own bias or perspective in an outward manner. Sure, everyone will have an opinion that can be unpopular in the eyes of the public and if that's the case, keep it to yourself. Especially bad instances to discriminate is when it violates another person's natural human right. Everyday we judge and our judgement comes from what we know and what we're influenced by. We have the good and bad choices in our heads but it is ultimately whether or not we choose to act upon them and openly discriminate. We can act like we don't judge and we can try our best not to, but sometimes it just tends to happen whether we like it or not. The choices we make that affect others can greatly impact both them and ourselves if we choose to move forward with them. Small choices and big choices can be predetermined for you and you make the choice ti accept or deny them. As Sheena Iyengar mentions in the TED talk though, is that choices made by you (the children in the experiment) were ultimately most successful then those with the choices made for them. The authority figures we have in our lives can just as effectively influence our decisions as we do. In our Pepper experiment, it seemed as many votes were caught by a majority simply because they all had a certain version of what "beauty" is (for a pepper). Who determines our perspective on our appearance? It seems as though just as we determine what looks good, society can also tell us what looks good and thus sway our choices. But, we can live in a world where discrimination and choice can be present and not hurt others, but simply keeping our opinions to ourselves.

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pannafugo
Posts: 17

Judgement and Discrimination

Judgement and discrimination are innate to being a human. Making choices, which is something everyone does every day, involves judgement and discrimination, even on the smallest scale. Should you take this staircase or that staircase to get to your next class? Well, that one is always crowded, so you take the other...that in itself is a judgement and discriminating the more crowded staircase in favor of one that may get you where you need to go more quickly. Extrapolate this out to every moment throughout the day. We cannot live without judgement and choice. Of course, technically, we could live without choice, as mentioned in the TED talk, where the citizens of previously communist occupied countries did not have choices, and once they did, they were reluctant to make them. In our society in the west, however, this is unfathomable. Overall, the point of judgement and decision making is to choose the best or better option in order to better one’s life or benefit them in some way.


Do we need to discriminate against people? Absolutely not, but again, I believe it is innate to all human beings to judge each other, and judging could lead to discrimination in this matter. Can we live in a world without discrimination? Again, no. We cannot prevent people from being prejudiced against others due to their ethnicity, race or religion. Using the example of the peppers in class, we cannot choose produce without discriminating against produce that is small, rotted, or discolored. On the most basic level, yes, we do need choice and judgement in order to function in a capitalist society. However, when this judgement is applied to humans in a negative manner, and people are discriminated against due to aspects of their appearance or identity that they cannot change, is not good (obviously) and should not be present in society, nor does it need to be in order for society to function.


In short, judging and discriminating can be good or bad, despite the immediate negative connotation of both words. We cannot live without either, no matter how hard we may try. In writing this post, I myself am judging the topic of discrimination and judging (pretty meta). It is unavoidable.


Guardianangel brings up an interesting point when they say that if one is judgemental or discriminatory towards something, they should keep it to themselves. That in itself is a choice that person should make. The world would be more peaceful if all negative thoughts were kept private, but people choose to make themselves be heard.

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shorty123
Posts: 16

What's Spoken and What's Unspoken

I feel like there are two categories of discrimination. I think that one is the way people subconsciously categorize and group people, and the other is negatively feeling a way about a certain group of people. Subconsciously grouping someone usually happens when you first meet them, and no it does not need to happen but it is someone's choice to decide if they are going to let what someone is change their view on them. I think a lot of people are unknown to to different cultures and backgrounds that are not their own, so when they see a difference from what they see as their “normal”, they retaliate to judging. Sometimes it’s just in their mind and never said aloud but many people do say these hurtful things out loud. Also in todays world, there are some hateful groups, for example rascit or homophobic groups, that have judged more vocally. People like that not only encourage others to feel that way, but also encourage others to hate or want to hurt people for who they are. The point of judgement is to create an opinion on a certain idea, and I think everyone will “judge”, but it is 100% up to a person to look at certain things with an open mind rather than a closed and negative mind. I feel like we do have a choice in this though. I think that as long as you are judging something positively, and that has nothing to do with another human being, someone's identity, or a specific group of people, then “judging” is fine. Like for example you can feel negatively about an ice cream flavors that you do not like, but you should never say you feel negatively about someone because they are a specific group of people. Choice is also a huge part of life because every choice you make affects you, which is why everyone should have the right to choose for themselves. In Sheena Iyengers Ted Talk, she compares France to the US when speaking of patient-doctor choices. More families in the US, when asked if they felt better about controlling the fate of their child, were happy that they decided to cut the cord rather than the doctor because they felt that it was their choice to do so. But, in France, they felt more comfortable with the doctor deciding. Iyengers speaks about how in America from an early age, we encourage choice and stop the sheltering of individuals because no one knows about you more than you but in other countries a lot of people are influenced by the opinions of their parents and the authoritative people around them. I believe that we can live in a world where people only judge upon first meeting someone and don’t negatively discriminate against others, but it’d be difficult because some people just aren’t willing to change.
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Regina Phalange
Posts: 19

We Can't Escape Judgement

It is essential to judge. In order to survive we need to be able to distinguish good from bad, safe from dangerous, easy from difficult and so on. Sometimes that involves things. You might need to judge a website to determine its credibility when getting resources for a project. Or you might have to judge a movie to determine whether or not you want to recommend it to your friend. Of course this applies to people as well. It is naive to think that we should go about our lives and not judge people. We need to have the skills to judge in order to determine whether or not another person is going to cause you harm or if that person is ok to be around.


Judgement becomes a problem, however, when it is uninformed and irrational. Making rash judgements of people, especially when those judgements are based on assumptions, leads to stereotypes. Stereotypes are often harmful towards certain groups of people, especially because they are so easy to perpetuate and so difficult to unlearn. Additionally, when those judgements affect our actions against a certain group of people, discrimination and ‘othering’ results. This furthers the divide between people, thus making it even easier to draw uninformed conclusions.


I think that the pepper exercise shows how natural it is for us to judge based on aesthetics. If we weren’t so accustomed to evaluating the physical appearance, it would have been much harder to choose a pepper. Nevertheless, we all had our own perception based on what we thought was the best. A lot of our choices were based on size, because we probably like the pepper that looks most appealing to eat. This concept is interesting when it comes to people, though. We all have our own perception of what is best when it comes to people’s appearances, even though there is not as a direct benefit to consider as the pepper’s use for eating. So what is the ‘benefit’ that we favor in people? I think that it goes beyond romantic attraction, because we all likely judge people whom we are not attracted to as well.


It can also be a problem when other people’s judgements influence one’s own perception of the world. Today, there is a lot of emphasis on shared decision making and groupthink in schools, but it is also important to have the ability to think independently. In the TED talk, Sheena Iyenger emphasizes that having too much outside influence can deter the ability to make rational decisions, especially for Americans.


It is unreasonable to live in a world without judgement, but it is certainly necessary to strive for a world without discrimination. I think that the way to do that is to have a balance between healthy judgement and efforts to avoid excess judgement. It's also important to stay informed so as to not to spread misinformation and perpetuate untrue stereotypes.


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DuckBoots
Posts: 25

The "e" on the scantron

As humans, animals, and products of evolution we make thousands of observations and judgments every hour. The second we enter a room, our brain is analyzing any possible dangers, exits, and who is in it. Once the brain decides we are in no immediate danger, the sense of judgement switches to people. We cannot help but sort people into categories. Friend or Foe, family member or not, and if we want them around us. When it came to the peppers we sorted them in our minds by size, color, and appearance. We gave each pepper a ranking based on these topics. What mattered the most to us is what makes each person unique. Kamilla and Jake mentioned that they picked pepper #2 based on its practicality in culinary use. We make these judgement everyday without thinking about it, and pretending that we can cut that part out of our brain is unrealistic. Based on Ms. Lyengar's experiences the ability and delight in sorting and choosing is instilled in youth at an early age. I remember playing "spot the mistakes" in Kindergarten.

However, what we can change is how we act on these judgments. Less with peppers, more with people this is crucial. Based on one's background prejudices can be learned or taught. They can be a struggle to overcome. If someone is raised to be racist towards a certain group should they be expected to ignore them? The answer is yes. That is a choice that we all must make. To allow other's life experiences and ignorance to jade your own is something we all must ignore. For example, if I tell you "Peanut Butter is gross". You have a choice to make. Do you accept my personal judgement of such a beloved American dish... or do you choose to make your own experience with it? As Ms. Lyengar points out, the sheer amount of choice and categories that exist now are staggering. Now instead of "bread" there are about fifty options such as "whole wheat", "sesame", and "reduced fat". Variety can be exciting to some, but when it comes to people are we isolating those who find choice difficult? I find the e option on a test offputting even if there is no option behind it. Just it's empty bubble makes me second guess if the correct option is even listed.

As a society, judgements and prejudices run rampant. They are both a cause and effect of oppression. A life without them does not exist. We can control how much they truly effect how we function. By not allowing discrimination based on "values" such as appearance, ability, and culture we take the power away from these hasty assumptions. The choice to not act on first impressions must be learned.

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Regina Phalange
Posts: 19

Originally posted by guardianangel on October 06, 2019 14:08

We have the good and bad choices in our heads but it is ultimately whether or not we choose to act upon them and openly discriminate. We can act like we don't judge and we can try our best not to, but sometimes it just tends to happen whether we like it or not. The choices we make that affect others can greatly impact both them and ourselves if we choose to move forward with them.

I agree, and I think that this is the turning point between judgement and discrimination. We will likely never learn not to judge people, but we can learn to be considerate of the actions that we take as a result of these judgements. Therefore, since judgement comes so naturally to us as humans, it is important to emphasize the importance of having rationale and self control when it comes to how we process it.

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DuckBoots
Posts: 25

Originally posted by guardianangel on October 06, 2019 14:08

I believe that discrimination is an innate instinct we have as humans. To be understand, we make the choice to categorize people in our lives. It isn't necessarily a bad thing, unless you discriminate by your own bias or perspective in an outward manner. Sure, everyone will have an opinion that can be unpopular in the eyes of the public and if that's the case, keep it to yourself. Especially bad instances to discriminate is when it violates another person's natural human right. Everyday we judge and our judgement comes from what we know and what we're influenced by. We have the good and bad choices in our heads but it is ultimately whether or not we choose to act upon them and openly discriminate. We can act like we don't judge and we can try our best not to, but sometimes it just tends to happen whether we like it or not. The choices we make that affect others can greatly impact both them and ourselves if we choose to move forward with them. Small choices and big choices can be predetermined for you and you make the choice ti accept or deny them. As Sheena Iyengar mentions in the TED talk though, is that choices made by you (the children in the experiment) were ultimately most successful then those with the choices made for them. The authority figures we have in our lives can just as effectively influence our decisions as we do. In our Pepper experiment, it seemed as many votes were caught by a majority simply because they all had a certain version of what "beauty" is (for a pepper). Who determines our perspective on our appearance? It seems as though just as we determine what looks good, society can also tell us what looks good and thus sway our choices. But, we can live in a world where discrimination and choice can be present and not hurt others, but simply keeping our opinions to ourselves.

I agree with Guardianangle that if you have personal discrimination you should keep them to yourself. However, I would challenge their seemingly passive stance on such an important issue. How can we ignore an issue that is present every day? One example of a bias that is most certainly police brutality aimed towards people of color. Officers of the law have biases that come to light in dangerous situation and it ends in violence. How can we screen for biases? In what occupations should we? How can we?

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DuckBoots
Posts: 25

Originally posted by Regina Phalange on October 07, 2019 19:23

It is essential to judge. In order to survive we need to be able to distinguish good from bad, safe from dangerous, easy from difficult and so on. Sometimes that involves things. You might need to judge a website to determine its credibility when getting resources for a project. Or you might have to judge a movie to determine whether or not you want to recommend it to your friend. Of course this applies to people as well. It is naive to think that we should go about our lives and not judge people. We need to have the skills to judge in order to determine whether or not another person is going to cause you harm or if that person is ok to be around.


Judgement becomes a problem, however, when it is uninformed and irrational. Making rash judgements of people, especially when those judgements are based on assumptions, leads to stereotypes. Stereotypes are often harmful towards certain groups of people, especially because they are so easy to perpetuate and so difficult to unlearn. Additionally, when those judgements affect our actions against a certain group of people, discrimination and ‘othering’ results. This furthers the divide between people, thus making it even easier to draw uninformed conclusions.


I think that the pepper exercise shows how natural it is for us to judge based on aesthetics. If we weren’t so accustomed to evaluating the physical appearance, it would have been much harder to choose a pepper. Nevertheless, we all had our own perception based on what we thought was the best. A lot of our choices were based on size, because we probably like the pepper that looks most appealing to eat. This concept is interesting when it comes to people, though. We all have our own perception of what is best when it comes to people’s appearances, even though there is not as a direct benefit to consider as the pepper’s use for eating. So what is the ‘benefit’ that we favor in people? I think that it goes beyond romantic attraction, because we all likely judge people whom we are not attracted to as well.


It can also be a problem when other people’s judgements influence one’s own perception of the world. Today, there is a lot of emphasis on shared decision making and groupthink in schools, but it is also important to have the ability to think independently. In the TED talk, Sheena Iyenger emphasizes that having too much outside influence can deter the ability to make rational decisions, especially for Americans.


It is unreasonable to live in a world without judgement, but it is certainly necessary to strive for a world without discrimination. I think that the way to do that is to have a balance between healthy judgement and efforts to avoid excess judgement. It's also important to stay informed so as to not to spread misinformation and perpetuate untrue stereotypes.


I disagree with Regina's point on judgement. I think that the line between good and bad judgement is not clear cut. What is an uninformed judgement? Does personal experience make a judgement valid? I think that judgements influence our every view on life. We form judgement based on the positive or negative experiences with a object. It is idealistic to beieve that judgement and stereotpes are irrational when they are at the core of our rationalty.

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guardianangel
Posts: 15

Originally posted by DuckBoots on October 07, 2019 19:26

As humans, animals, and products of evolution we make thousands of observations and judgments every hour. The second we enter a room, our brain is analyzing any possible dangers, exits, and who is in it. Once the brain decides we are in no immediate danger, the sense of judgement switches to people. We cannot help but sort people into categories. Friend or Foe, family member or not, and if we want them around us. When it came to the peppers we sorted them in our minds by size, color, and appearance. We gave each pepper a ranking based on these topics. What mattered the most to us is what makes each person unique. Kamilla and Jake mentioned that they picked pepper #2 based on its practicality in culinary use. We make these judgement everyday without thinking about it, and pretending that we can cut that part out of our brain is unrealistic. Based on Ms. Lyengar's experiences the ability and delight in sorting and choosing is instilled in youth at an early age. I remember playing "spot the mistakes" in Kindergarten.

However, what we can change is how we act on these judgments. Less with peppers, more with people this is crucial. Based on one's background prejudices can be learned or taught. They can be a struggle to overcome. If someone is raised to be racist towards a certain group should they be expected to ignore them? The answer is yes. That is a choice that we all must make. To allow other's life experiences and ignorance to jade your own is something we all must ignore. For example, if I tell you "Peanut Butter is gross". You have a choice to make. Do you accept my personal judgement of such a beloved American dish... or do you choose to make your own experience with it? As Ms. Lyengar points out, the sheer amount of choice and categories that exist now are staggering. Now instead of "bread" there are about fifty options such as "whole wheat", "sesame", and "reduced fat". Variety can be exciting to some, but when it comes to people are we isolating those who find choice difficult? I find the e option on a test offputting even if there is no option behind it. Just it's empty bubble makes me second guess if the correct option is even listed.

As a society, judgements and prejudices run rampant. They are both a cause and effect of oppression. A life without them does not exist. We can control how much they truly effect how we function. By not allowing discrimination based on "values" such as appearance, ability, and culture we take the power away from these hasty assumptions. The choice to not act on first impressions must be learned.

I agree with DuckBoots (great name btw). I think that the ability to act on impulse based on choice is indeed learned.
But not only is it learned, it is controlled by those around us. Whether we be vocal about our choices is influenced because our friends can make us loud or quiet.

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fatimazraibi
Posts: 20

Discrimination is Necessary

I believe discrimination, without segregation or bias, is necessary for identifying. There is no possible way to live in a world with so many different identities without noticing them. You could not tell the difference between people if you ignored their appearance. When shopping, you need to be able to tell the difference between things to pick the most desirable product to you. Obviously it’s not okay to apply that to humans, but you still need to tell the difference between people to tell who you’re talking to or looking for, etc.


Judgment is not always necessary, though it is important to be able to make decisions. Sometimes people give signs that they are not good people and that you need to avoid them. This, again, does not always apply. You should not be using discernment to judge somebody, such as avoiding somebody because of the fact that they’re white or male or a certain height/size. This is when it becomes unnecessary and even bad.

Bias against someone who looks different is, as common knowledge of past and current events would tell us, not good. Some people use the fact that they can tell the difference between people to justify hatred or even violence. (I mean good for you for having a basic human skill that anyone who isn’t blind has, but that’s not really a reason to hurt people because they’re from somewhere you’re not...)

I don’t think a society without discrimination (using the definition of recognition of difference, not prejudice based on race or other identifying factors) could exist unless at some point in the future, races and ethnicities mix together so well that everyone looks similar and science is so advanced that age difference is barely obvious. However, considering recent estimates of when the human race will cease to exist due to climate change versus when this society with lack of difference could come into being, I doubt this will happen at all. As of now, in current times, discrimination is necessary, and difference makes it easy to identify other people. Of course there are bad things that come with it, such as racial bias and sexism, but discrimination is used more often in a normal, everyday context than in a prejudicial, biased way.

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ghostchicago
Posts: 22

Social Conditioning and Choice

I think that choice and discrimination are an integral part of how our society functions. Without this notion of discrimination, there is no need to have different things. We can use choice to help get us the best deal, or discriminate in order to make a tough decision. The problem arises when we are using stereotypes, first impressions, and negative previous experiences to inform our choices.


One thing I thought was really interesting from Sheena Iyengar’s talk was the distinction of choice that differs between cultural perception. As Americans, it is easy for us to have a large consumer market with what we consider to be many different varieties of the same product. However, many of the choices we make on a daily basis make absolutely no difference to our lives, but we have been conditioned into thinking that these trivial decisions matter. If we were unknowingly given Coke instead of Pepsi, most of us wouldn’t even notice, yet the choice between the two when looking at the labels on cans in a store seems to matter. We all accepted the pepper exercise and chose our favorite, but if we were given a random one to eat, we wouldn’t be able to tell the best looking one from the ugliest. Other cultures haven’t been socially conditioned to pick apart the minute and somewhat differences between these things, and can realize the absurdity of choosing between things that are identical. This made me think about other choices that we have, important choices. Are they really as varied and important as we make them seem, or are we just conditioned to overestimate the differences between our choices?

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fatimazraibi
Posts: 20

Originally posted by guardianangel on October 06, 2019 14:08

I believe that discrimination is an innate instinct we have as humans. To be understand, we make the choice to categorize people in our lives. It isn't necessarily a bad thing, unless you discriminate by your own bias or perspective in an outward manner. Sure, everyone will have an opinion that can be unpopular in the eyes of the public and if that's the case, keep it to yourself. Especially bad instances to discriminate is when it violates another person's natural human right. Everyday we judge and our judgement comes from what we know and what we're influenced by. We have the good and bad choices in our heads but it is ultimately whether or not we choose to act upon them and openly discriminate.

I agree that it is impulse and our nature to discriminate and judge. However, you can control how you act around people. Maybe you treat someone differently and genuinely cannot control whether or not you do so. But actually going out of your way to make someone uncomfortable or hurt because of the fact that they are different IS controllable. You have the right to judge for your own good on appearance and actions of a person. You have the right to tell the difference between a brown person and an Asian person. This doesn’t mean you have the right to harm someone because of either of these rights.

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ghostchicago
Posts: 22

Originally posted by DuckBoots on October 07, 2019 19:38

Originally posted by guardianangel on October 06, 2019 14:08

I believe that discrimination is an innate instinct we have as humans. To be understand, we make the choice to categorize people in our lives. It isn't necessarily a bad thing, unless you discriminate by your own bias or perspective in an outward manner. Sure, everyone will have an opinion that can be unpopular in the eyes of the public and if that's the case, keep it to yourself. Especially bad instances to discriminate is when it violates another person's natural human right. Everyday we judge and our judgement comes from what we know and what we're influenced by. We have the good and bad choices in our heads but it is ultimately whether or not we choose to act upon them and openly discriminate. We can act like we don't judge and we can try our best not to, but sometimes it just tends to happen whether we like it or not. The choices we make that affect others can greatly impact both them and ourselves if we choose to move forward with them. Small choices and big choices can be predetermined for you and you make the choice ti accept or deny them. As Sheena Iyengar mentions in the TED talk though, is that choices made by you (the children in the experiment) were ultimately most successful then those with the choices made for them. The authority figures we have in our lives can just as effectively influence our decisions as we do. In our Pepper experiment, it seemed as many votes were caught by a majority simply because they all had a certain version of what "beauty" is (for a pepper). Who determines our perspective on our appearance? It seems as though just as we determine what looks good, society can also tell us what looks good and thus sway our choices. But, we can live in a world where discrimination and choice can be present and not hurt others, but simply keeping our opinions to ourselves.

I agree with Guardianangle that if you have personal discrimination you should keep them to yourself. However, I would challenge their seemingly passive stance on such an important issue. How can we ignore an issue that is present every day? One example of a bias that is most certainly police brutality aimed towards people of color. Officers of the law have biases that come to light in dangerous situation and it ends in violence. How can we screen for biases? In what occupations should we? How can we?

I agree with both guardianangel and DuckBoots in that when bias comes into play in our decisions and judgements, it can lead to negative consequences. However, I don't necessarily agree with the idea of "just keep it to yourself". That seems to be understating a larger issue of bias and preference that can lead to potentially harmful or dangerous situations. When we have bias, we need to confront it instead of simply ignoring it or keeping it to ourselves. There is no benefit to ignoring these biases and letting them fester, especially those that violate other's natural rights. It's a very complex issue, especially when taking into account how it can impact police misconduct, as DuckBoots mentions. I don't know what the solution to this is, or even if there is something we can feasibly do to combat these issues, but ignoring them is certainly not a solution.

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borne
Posts: 23

Originally posted by guardianangel on October 06, 2019 14:08

I believe that discrimination is an innate instinct we have as humans. To be understand, we make the choice to categorize people in our lives. It isn't necessarily a bad thing, unless you discriminate by your own bias or perspective in an outward manner. Sure, everyone will have an opinion that can be unpopular in the eyes of the public and if that's the case, keep it to yourself. Especially bad instances to discriminate is when it violates another person's natural human right. Everyday we judge and our judgement comes from what we know and what we're influenced by. We have the good and bad choices in our heads but it is ultimately whether or not we choose to act upon them and openly discriminate. We can act like we don't judge and we can try our best not to, but sometimes it just tends to happen whether we like it or not. The choices we make that affect others can greatly impact both them and ourselves if we choose to move forward with them. Small choices and big choices can be predetermined for you and you make the choice ti accept or deny them. As Sheena Iyengar mentions in the TED talk though, is that choices made by you (the children in the experiment) were ultimately most successful then those with the choices made for them. The authority figures we have in our lives can just as effectively influence our decisions as we do. In our Pepper experiment, it seemed as many votes were caught by a majority simply because they all had a certain version of what "beauty" is (for a pepper). Who determines our perspective on our appearance? It seems as though just as we determine what looks good, society can also tell us what looks good and thus sway our choices. But, we can live in a world where discrimination and choice can be present and not hurt others, but simply keeping our opinions to ourselves.

I agree completely with you. The ability to discriminate is a learned behavior originally developed for our safety, and in the most basic definition, to discriminate means to recognize and understand the difference between one thing and another. You're right in believing that to have a personal opinion that may be unpopular to the majority, as everyone is entitled and has been raised with their own standards and beliefs. All of these opinions are fine to have as long as there is no direct action taken upon them.

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