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radicalbond
Posts: 7

The Extent of Choosing

It has always been a resounding theme that choice and discrimination are two different things, but it's interesting to note that discrimination just means choosing in a morally wrong way (i.e. choosing to treat someone unfairly due to their sex, race, religion, etc.). Interestingly enough, we often find that our choices whether good or bad, don't always resonate with us, compared to others. For example, choosing which peppers we want, hence the in-class activity simply doesn't affect our lives to the extent that choosing what our major will be or where we want to live does. In her TedTalk, Sheena Iyengar informs us how her studies have shown that with the greater quantity of choices we have, the more likely we are to not make the best choice. This is interesting because given the liberty we have won over the past few decades, we welcome the often infuriating process of making decisions on our own. Choices, as Ms. Freeman stated, are all around us, surrounding our daily lives. As Dinosaur said in their post, without the ability to make choices, our societies would lack coherent function, but it seems that the more choices we have, the farther we go from realizing how our own decisions often shape us for the worst. Iyengar said, "Choice no longer offers opportunities, but imposes constraints. It's not a marker of liberation but of suffocation by meaningless minutiae." And while I agree with Heyyy1234 when they said that people have a negative connotation with the word "judge", the necessity of choosing and subsequently judging is needed (in a court trial, for example), however, it's become clear that the excessive extent of choosing isn't inherently a good thing. As a society, we have done larger things but not necessarily better things. It's like the saying goes, quality over quantity. An important question to ask therefore is, has the freedom to choose shaped us into a more selfish society than ever before? But the choice to ironically choose depends subsequently on morals, therefore to avoid judgment and discrimination would be to completely refine the way we think about morality and principles.
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Joe Student
Posts: 6

Originally posted by green1234 on October 05, 2019 17:00

It is necessary to judge in order to make choices. We judge by discriminating among things and people. The only way that I have been taught to make decisions is to judge my options by weighing the pros and cons, therefore discriminating between the two options. I agree with heyyy1234 when they said that people have a negative connotation of the word judge. Like they said, it is a natural thing and I believe that we must to it in order to make decisions that we can accept ourselves for. Discrimination also has a negative connotation behind it but that is only one definition of the word. It can also simply mean “recognition and understanding of the difference between one thing and another” (google definition). So, I think that judgement and discrimination are good things because they ultimately allow us to make choices which are important because they are what structures our lives. We cannot live without choices and therefore judgement and discrimination because then we would not be individuals.


In the Ted Talk, Iyengar said that the American way to make choices is to be true to yourself. I was surprised when she talked about the experiment in Japantown, San Francisco and she said that Asian-Americans are more likely to make collective choices (ie choose what their “mothers” tell them to choose) than Anglo-Americans. It shows the intense culture difference between people that I think accounts for their preferences in choice, and therefore judgement and discrimination. Differences in preferences is what makes society function because it allows for there to be many different kinds of things in the world. For example if you like only mint gum but your friend likes only bubblegum there is an option for both of you that will make you happy. Having the ability to make a choice means giving everyone in society the chance to be happy because different things make different people happy. Happiness is essential to making society function so therefore choices (and judgement and discrimination), are essential to making society function.


The discrimination and judgement that we used to choose peppers was the entire reason that we choose differently. Because difference is a good thing, judgement and discrimination is a good thing. Keep in mind the discrimination I am talking about is the recognition and understanding of the difference between one thing and another. The world can’t exist without these things because then it would be too hard to make choices. Without choices, we wouldn’t be happy, and the world wouldn't exist without happiness. I was happy with the pepper I chose, and I used judgement and discrimination to chose it. I think that everyone else’s choice of pepper also made them happy, whether it was tall and skinny or short and stout. In order to have a functioning society and an actual world, we need judgement and discrimination so that we can make choices.

I see what you're getting at here. There are plenty of aspects that fall under the umbrella of "survival of the fittest", so it's no surprise that nobody picked pepper #1. It's kind of like being picked last for a team . Someone is meant to judge which person or object is worthy enough and which is not, leaving the smallest one behind.

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Lonecone
Posts: 9

Originally posted by heyyy1234 on October 04, 2019 20:45

I feel like judgement is a very natural and innate characteristic in most all living things. People have this instant negative connotation to the word judgement-- as if it's some unspoken taboo trait despite us all sharing it. Subconsciously, we are constantly judging everything around us: people, food, places, clothes, the list goes on. We shouldn't necessarily beat ourselves up for judging because it's instinctive. When we are birthed into this world, we aren't good or bad, nor do we harbor judgement. As we grow older, however, we reflect and learn from our atmospheres and are able to craft our own definitions of good, bad, and everything in between-- that's what's so beautiful and unique about every single person on the planet. The thing about judgement is that it's not a choice, acting upon it is. We judge based off of our own truths and moral compasses. As Iyengar explains in her Ted-Talk: “we all make assumptions about the world—based on individual experience and cultural background—that affect our judgment of how that balance should look."' Our minds are constantly at a very explorative and vulnerable default; we always end up judging. Then, we beat ourselves up for judging as if it's something we can control. After that, we sort these thoughts into good, bad, and the in-between. Now, we know what to do and what not-to-do. I feel like we cannot necessarily speak upon anyone else when it comes to thoughts and feelings because only that individual knows their truth. It's not obligatory to share your beliefs with anyone, but when you start negatively affecting other people because of how you feel is when judgement becomes discrimination. There is a glass wall between the two.

The word discrimination essentially means bias. However, as history plays out, we come to learn that discrimination is also a social behavior where someone has a preference for one thing/ person over others based off of surface-level characteristics: race, gender, class, etc. As Iyengar explores choice, she says: “It's not a marker of liberation, but of suffocation by meaningless minutiae.” Some people are simply scared of choosing because they don't want to make the wrong choice. Regardless, it's still something we are all able to do. We aren't usually willing to explore the complexity of choice because our actions are often dictated by our comfort zones.Choice and judgements are necessities because they're convenient and--to an extent-- compose our individuality. In class when we did the pepper evaluation, a lot of people chose pepper #2 because it was a nice looking pepper. However, those who chose pepper #2 judged all the other peppers for being quite different from the seemingly ideal pepper. Everyone else who chose different peppers judged the fans of pepper #2. The peppers couldn't just exist and live their pepper lives: they were all forced into a ranking for our own benefit of making a choice. We didn't have to choose a pepper, but we all complied. We were told to make a choice and we did. We all had different criteria for the pepper that the other peppers lacked: length, width, girth, and aesthetic, and we chose to compare the peppers against each other. Judgment is only useful when it's needed. The poor guys didn't deserve that. Psychologically, we were reflecting our own values regarding physical appearance and use. I feel like it's really important for people to step out of their own perceptions and immerse themselves in other people's as well. What's the point of thinking if you only have your own perspective? Humans are at a constant state of growth-- we should always be actively creating a place in our minds that not only nurtures our own judgements and thoughts, but also welcomes those of others as well. We have a reliance on judgement because, again, it partially composes our identity. I feel like the idea of living in a world where we're all allowed to exist vulnerably would be ideal, but nearly impossible. Judging and discriminating runs in our blood, whether we want to believe it or not. Again, when we (negatively) act on them and affect other people is when judging crosses the line between harmony and chaos. Judgement can coexist with harmony, but the relationship is built on a foundation of tolerance.



I completely agree with your thoughts on choices: how judgement is natural and instinctive, and how it only becomes harmful when we use our judgment and preferences to, for example, judge other people for not having the same choices as we do. I think that it is just completely impossible for a world without any judgment to exist. Decision-making plays a huge role in our lives and I think that it is the formation of judgment and essentially these decisions that allow us to survive. Also, I like how your title promotes openness to other people's ideas and opinions.

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Lonecone
Posts: 9

Originally posted by green1234 on October 05, 2019 17:00

It is necessary to judge in order to make choices. We judge by discriminating among things and people. The only way that I have been taught to make decisions is to judge my options by weighing the pros and cons, therefore discriminating between the two options. I agree with heyyy1234 when they said that people have a negative connotation of the word judge. Like they said, it is a natural thing and I believe that we must to it in order to make decisions that we can accept ourselves for. Discrimination also has a negative connotation behind it but that is only one definition of the word. It can also simply mean “recognition and understanding of the difference between one thing and another” (google definition). So, I think that judgement and discrimination are good things because they ultimately allow us to make choices which are important because they are what structures our lives. We cannot live without choices and therefore judgement and discrimination because then we would not be individuals.


In the Ted Talk, Iyengar said that the American way to make choices is to be true to yourself. I was surprised when she talked about the experiment in Japantown, San Francisco and she said that Asian-Americans are more likely to make collective choices (ie choose what their “mothers” tell them to choose) than Anglo-Americans. It shows the intense culture difference between people that I think accounts for their preferences in choice, and therefore judgement and discrimination. Differences in preferences is what makes society function because it allows for there to be many different kinds of things in the world. For example if you like only mint gum but your friend likes only bubblegum there is an option for both of you that will make you happy. Having the ability to make a choice means giving everyone in society the chance to be happy because different things make different people happy. Happiness is essential to making society function so therefore choices (and judgement and discrimination), are essential to making society function.


The discrimination and judgement that we used to choose peppers was the entire reason that we choose differently. Because difference is a good thing, judgement and discrimination is a good thing. Keep in mind the discrimination I am talking about is the recognition and understanding of the difference between one thing and another. The world can’t exist without these things because then it would be too hard to make choices. Without choices, we wouldn’t be happy, and the world wouldn't exist without happiness. I was happy with the pepper I chose, and I used judgement and discrimination to chose it. I think that everyone else’s choice of pepper also made them happy, whether it was tall and skinny or short and stout. In order to have a functioning society and an actual world, we need judgement and discrimination so that we can make choices.

I like how you took into account the fact that everyone who made their choice of best pepper was happy with their chosen pepper, even if it might not be the same as their classmates. However, just like Sheena Iyengar discussed, sometimes the ability to have a choice does not necessarily equate happiness. In her TEDTalk, she talked about how American families who were given the choice to whether pull their baby off the life machine or let them live in a vegetative state (and chose the first option), generally harbored more negative feelings towards it even a year later. Ultimately, even the idea of choice and how we perceive it varies from person to person, and at the end of the day, is decided upon through individual preferences.

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redcheetah150
Posts: 9

decisions and kindness

There is no question: the world cannot exist without judgement. Every animal on the planet must make decisions in order to thrive. It simply is the way the world works. We, humans, no matter how special we think we are (and actually are), are still animals. In order to further the existence of our species, we have to make decisions about what will give us the best chance to reproduce. Sometimes, that isn't even a conscious decision, but it is one every single one of us makes. That is just one example of many instances in which we must decide, simply because that is the way the world works. Sheena Iyengar says in her TED Talk, "the process of choosing can be confusing and frustrating." Example: Do I choose College A or College B? This decision will have an enormous impact on the rest of my life. It can also be quite easy. Example: Which green pepper do I choose? They're all so similar, and I will forget about them in an hour. But on either end of the spectrum, we are making a decision because we don't have the time or energy or money to choose both. The only way the world could function without judgement or discrimination is if people were wired differently. But since we are just animals who want to reproduce, we constantly have to decide.

The reason this issue is a contested one today is because we have often exceeded the simple act of making judgement calls, and crossed into the territory discriminating to hurt others. Sometimes we can't help it, as one decision we make is bound to negatively impact somebody else. This goes back to the need for judgement. But we shouldn't cross the line. When we can, we should palliate to lessen that negative impact. When we make a decision that we know will hurt somebody else, and we have to make that decision, we should have empathy after the fact. If you choose to try to win a baseball game, and you end of winning, you shouldn't rub it in the opposition's face. You should display sportsmanship and show respect. You made that decision to benefit yourself and it ended up hurting someone else. Fine. That's reality. But showing kindness is a must.

This is an issue that is extremely subjective. Every judgement and discrimination carries different gravity. In the end, we must do all we can to help out if we hurt somebody else. It sounds weird and it might not be welcome, but we've got to at least try.

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redcheetah150
Posts: 9

Originally posted by radicalbond on October 07, 2019 21:28

It has always been a resounding theme that choice and discrimination are two different things, but it's interesting to note that discrimination just means choosing in a morally wrong way (i.e. choosing to treat someone unfairly due to their sex, race, religion, etc.). Interestingly enough, we often find that our choices whether good or bad, don't always resonate with us, compared to others. For example, choosing which peppers we want, hence the in-class activity simply doesn't affect our lives to the extent that choosing what our major will be or where we want to live does. In her TedTalk, Sheena Iyengar informs us how her studies have shown that with the greater quantity of choices we have, the more likely we are to not make the best choice. This is interesting because given the liberty we have won over the past few decades, we welcome the often infuriating process of making decisions on our own. Choices, as Ms. Freeman stated, are all around us, surrounding our daily lives. As Dinosaur said in their post, without the ability to make choices, our societies would lack coherent function, but it seems that the more choices we have, the farther we go from realizing how our own decisions often shape us for the worst. Iyengar said, "Choice no longer offers opportunities, but imposes constraints. It's not a marker of liberation but of suffocation by meaningless minutiae." And while I agree with Heyyy1234 when they said that people have a negative connotation with the word "judge", the necessity of choosing and subsequently judging is needed (in a court trial, for example), however, it's become clear that the excessive extent of choosing isn't inherently a good thing. As a society, we have done larger things but not necessarily better things. It's like the saying goes, quality over quantity. An important question to ask therefore is, has the freedom to choose shaped us into a more selfish society than ever before? But the choice to ironically choose depends subsequently on morals, therefore to avoid judgment and discrimination would be to completely refine the way we think about morality and principles.

I don't think our freedom to choose has turned us into a more selfish society. Our selfish nature has. And it's our selfish nature that makes us choose. This is a one-way flow. It's what any animal on this planet would do if they had the kind of brains we do. We are able to take over the world, so we do. It's human nature to be selfish, and this is how we make our decisions.

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rocketman101
Posts: 5

A pre-conceived idea of what it all meant

We judge others, others judge us. That is just the way humans are. Our brains our wired to have a set of likes and dislikes, and upon meeting new people or trying new things, we have a checklist in our heads of what we like and don’t like, based on our preconceived beliefs. This isn’t necessarily good or bad, it is just the way things are. What matters most is how we move forward from there and actually put in an effort to get to know the people around us, because our assumptions shouldn’t make up a person.

Until the pepper experiment, I hadn’t really looked back and noticed how judgy I am. For example, while presenting our identity vessels, I thought I had already summed up pretty much everyone in the class based on looks, what I had heard about them, and just general assumptions I made. I think I got a few close to kind of right, but for the most part I judged these kids and I was completely wrong. I won’t say specific names but it turned out the not-so-athletic looking person actually played like 5 sports and someone who I thought was extremely happy actually has a lot of bad stuff going on right now. This just goes to show all of the wrong assumptions I had about people I barely know. But I shouldn’t be surprised, because I literally barely knew them. Going forward from there, I want to make an effort to genuinely get to know people and make sure that my preconceived judgements do not define that person for me.


I think it is impossible to live in a world without judgement and discrimination. Whether it be picking a pepper at the grocery store or picking your friend for your kickball team during gym, we will always choose our “favorite”. But I think we have to get in the mindset that just because you as an individual have a preference/favorite, that doesn’t mean the other options are lesser. My favorite fruit could be your least favorite fruit. Or vice versa. That doesn’t mean you have to start a debate on why apples are terrible.


But fruit and other inanimate objects aren’t as important as people. I doubt a pepper would cry if you didn’t pick it at the grocery store. We always have to make choices and sometimes they’re difficult to make but if you think it is what is best then you have the right to choose that. But most of the time it is not that simple. Like in the TED talk, cultural background can also influence choice and judgement. I like the way heyyy1234 put it, saying “choice and judgement (to an extent) compose our individuality.”

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Yoons93
Posts: 9

Don't judge a book by its cover

From an early age, we have been taught to make decisions without actually thinking of the process that we are going through. Choosing from what to have for breakfast to what outfit to wear, life is all about decisions. Sometimes, to make decisions, we often think about which one seems more fitting, nicer, beneficial, or just better in general. We are often told that we should not judge a book by its cover, but when we were little kids back in elementary school, we judged those who seemed “weird” or “awkward” from us and without realising, we were actually discriminating against them.

Let’s think about the peppers example from class. We were all just supposed to choose which pepper is the best out of all of them, and we all used our own judgement to decide that. When asked about why they chose a certain pepper, each one of us had very different reasons: thickness, weight, color, smell, etc. It wasn’t until the end of class that we were told that what we were doing was discriminating the other peppers in order to prove that the pepper that we chose was better than the rest.

While watching “The Art of Choosing” By Sheena Iyenger, one quote that stood out to me was “Americans train their whole lives to play ‘spot the difference.’ They practice this from such an early age that they’ve come to believe that everyone must be born with this ability.”, meaning that we have grown to become people who judge without knowing that we are judging at that moment. I believe that discriminating against people is wrong in every way. Just because they are not the same race, ethnicity, or are just different from you doesn’t give you or them the right to judge in any way, shape, or form. Although judgement is something that we have programmed in our hard drive, one thing is judging an object/situation, and another thing is judging a person.

“..though all humans share a basic need and desire for choice, we don’t all see choice in the same places or to the same extent.” was another point that Iyenger brought up during her talk which emphasizes how everyone has their own thoughts and opinions, which might clash with the opinions of others. The idea of living in a world without discrimination sounds like the perfect world that we all want to be in. However, living in a world without discrimination would mean a world without choice and opinion. In this case, I’m referring to the idea of judging objects and stuff like that. A world without discrimination of people would be the best thing that could ever happen, but sadly it is still far from being true.


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Yoons93
Posts: 9

Originally posted by heyyy1234 on October 04, 2019 20:45

I feel like judgement is a very natural and innate characteristic in most all living things. People have this instant negative connotation to the word judgement-- as if it's some unspoken taboo trait despite us all sharing it. Subconsciously, we are constantly judging everything around us: people, food, places, clothes, the list goes on. We shouldn't necessarily beat ourselves up for judging because it's instinctive. When we are birthed into this world, we aren't good or bad, nor do we harbor judgement. As we grow older, however, we reflect and learn from our atmospheres and are able to craft our own definitions of good, bad, and everything in between-- that's what's so beautiful and unique about every single person on the planet. The thing about judgement is that it's not a choice, acting upon it is. We judge based off of our own truths and moral compasses. As Iyengar explains in her Ted-Talk: “we all make assumptions about the world—based on individual experience and cultural background—that affect our judgment of how that balance should look."' Our minds are constantly at a very explorative and vulnerable default; we always end up judging. Then, we beat ourselves up for judging as if it's something we can control. After that, we sort these thoughts into good, bad, and the in-between. Now, we know what to do and what not-to-do. I feel like we cannot necessarily speak upon anyone else when it comes to thoughts and feelings because only that individual knows their truth. It's not obligatory to share your beliefs with anyone, but when you start negatively affecting other people because of how you feel is when judgement becomes discrimination. There is a glass wall between the two.

The word discrimination essentially means bias. However, as history plays out, we come to learn that discrimination is also a social behavior where someone has a preference for one thing/ person over others based off of surface-level characteristics: race, gender, class, etc. As Iyengar explores choice, she says: “It's not a marker of liberation, but of suffocation by meaningless minutiae.” Some people are simply scared of choosing because they don't want to make the wrong choice. Regardless, it's still something we are all able to do. We aren't usually willing to explore the complexity of choice because our actions are often dictated by our comfort zones.Choice and judgements are necessities because they're convenient and--to an extent-- compose our individuality. In class when we did the pepper evaluation, a lot of people chose pepper #2 because it was a nice looking pepper. However, those who chose pepper #2 judged all the other peppers for being quite different from the seemingly ideal pepper. Everyone else who chose different peppers judged the fans of pepper #2. The peppers couldn't just exist and live their pepper lives: they were all forced into a ranking for our own benefit of making a choice. We didn't have to choose a pepper, but we all complied. We were told to make a choice and we did. We all had different criteria for the pepper that the other peppers lacked: length, width, girth, and aesthetic, and we chose to compare the peppers against each other. Judgment is only useful when it's needed. The poor guys didn't deserve that. Psychologically, we were reflecting our own values regarding physical appearance and use. I feel like it's really important for people to step out of their own perceptions and immerse themselves in other people's as well. What's the point of thinking if you only have your own perspective? Humans are at a constant state of growth-- we should always be actively creating a place in our minds that not only nurtures our own judgements and thoughts, but also welcomes those of others as well. We have a reliance on judgement because, again, it partially composes our identity. I feel like the idea of living in a world where we're all allowed to exist vulnerably would be ideal, but nearly impossible. Judging and discriminating runs in our blood, whether we want to believe it or not. Again, when we (negatively) act on them and affect other people is when judging crosses the line between harmony and chaos. Judgement can coexist with harmony, but the relationship is built on a foundation of tolerance.



I really like how you went to explain how the word judgement has a bad connotation because we often worry when we hear that word because we feel like we are going to be called out for a flaw or mistake that we might have done. I think that we all judge without even realizing that we are judging because we have grown to be judgmental and complex individials. I also agree with “ I feel like the idea of living in a world where we're all allowed to exist vulnerably would be ideal, but nearly impossible. Judging and discriminating runs in our blood, whether we want to believe it or not.” because it just proves my previous point that no matter if we mean it or not, judging has become more of like a reflex in our lives, and how living in a world where people wouldn't judge each other would be something that is out of our reach at the moment.

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Yoons93
Posts: 9

Originally posted by nocap66 on October 06, 2019 19:55

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary the noun judgment means “the process of forming an opinion or evaluation by discerning and comparing.” By this definition judgement is used to look at something or someone and decide what you think of them. If we’re talking about people then I would argue that it is only occasionally necessary to judge a person, but with objects or ideas it is allowed.

People are sensitive creatures who should all be treated with the respect they deserve 100% of the time, but sometimes you must judge someone’s character. For example in a court of law where someone is accused of committing a crime, they must be judged to decide whether they are guilty or not. When it is not necessary to judge another human is pretty much any other occasion. Although people are all entitled to our opinions, it is not our job to decide anything about a person because we will never know all the facts unless we magically become the person you’re judging.

With ideas and objects it is okay to judge them. In our class activity in which we judged peppers based on their size, color, shape, etc.. I believe that it was okay to judge them since there is no consequence for forming an opinion about something that has never been alive. The students participating in the activity were not trying to harm anyone’s feelings, and did not because peppers cannot feel bad. Personally, I just choose the largest pepper because I thought you would be able to get the most food out of it, not because of any strong negative or positive feelings I had toward it.

The point of judgement is to gather an opinion about something or someone. It isn’t necessary to making choices regarding things, due to free will and all, but I would suggest it. For example when deciding what school to go to, you have to see the pros and cons of your options, I would judge each school then pick which one is best for me. Choosing can be bad if it’s between people, in this case I wouldn’t do it. Making someone pick between two people is wrong according to the Golden Rule, “treat others the way you want to be treated,” since it forces you to pick someone over another.

The role of choices in society is to make everyone an individual. Based on the choices you’ve made in your lifetime affect who you become. Sheena Iyengar, an expert on choices, said “Our choices construct our relationships, careers, world-views, and identities–we are the sum of our choices.” She also called choices, “our greatest tool for innovation.” Therefore choices are essential to making a society function because if every person on Earth made the same choices we would all be the same people and the world would not be able to move forward. I do believe it is possible to live in a world without discrimination, but not judgment. Judgment can have no harm since it can be considered just an opinion and it is how we decide who we are as people. Discrimination on the other hand is prejudice toward someone because they are different. This is most definitely not necessary for people daily lives to function.

I agree with how judging objects is okay because there are no consequences for judging the object for its appearance, color, size, etc. In class, that’s what we technically did in order to choose what we thought was the best pepper out of the five peppers there. I also liked when you said “Therefore choices are essential to making a society function because if every person on Earth made the same choices we would all be the same people and the world would not be able to move forward.” because I wasn’t really able to word that thought correctly in my head but you were able to word it perfectly and I really wanted to say that because I also think that a world where there’s no judgement wouldn’t be as functional and a world without discrimination is far from becoming reality.

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asdfghjkl0112
Posts: 5

"We" vs. "They" Peppers

In a perfect world, I’m sure people would say that we should stop judgment and discrimination altogether. However, sometimes we do need to make choices and put down other options to come to a conclusion that is best for us. Naturally, as human beings, we have a mindset in our head of what we like and what we don’t. For example, when applying to college, you are told that you should have reach schools, have likely/possible schools, and have safety schools. You will then have to narrow down all the colleges you have looked at and essentially judge which one is best for you and what is best for you based on the criteria you are looking for.

Discrimination, judgment, and choice-making all isolate one thing or certain things to other thing(s). Although I feel like no matter what, there is always going to be judgment and discrimination in the world, I also feel as though there are extents and limits as to the way you think, speak, or react. Of course, no person can tell someone else how to think and there are and sadly probably will always have hateful people in the world. To an extent, discrimination is necessary. You can’t eat all the food in the world, so you will need to decide what you want for dinner. You can’t be in two places at once, so you need to prioritize and go to the one that needs more. I do think that there are some extreme cases of discrimination—being racist or giving an unjust treatment based on gender, gender identity and/or age.

We judge because it comes naturally to us. If people never looked at something (like an idea or thought) and thought there could be more, or that it just simply wasn't good enough, we would not have laws or enough ideologies in the world. The judgment humans have toward other things can be good or bad depending on the context. We can only hope that more humans can use it for positive things or things that will beneficial to the world.

A world without discrimination and judgment cannot exist because there would be no variety. We should focus on making good choices and ending the world of hatred rather than discrimination and judgment because we need to make sure our decisions are good for us in the long run.

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DaffyDuck26
Posts: 7

Necessary

Discriminating against things is a very different conversation than against people. I think you should try to give every person you meet a chance to speak and be influenced by them, because connections with people are the most important thing in the world in my opinion. Whereas things, there are some things that are literally unhealthy for you, so the judgement in the case comes from simply deciding to benefit your body’s physical health. There are some things that can harm you, and we know what can and can’t, so things can quickly be discriminated against. However with people we cannot tell which ones will be beneficial to our lives, leaving the possibilities endless, which is why I believe we shouldn’t discriminate between people in our daily lives, because out of nowhere, someone you’d never expect could have a major impact on your life.


I think we judge in order just to make everyday decisions in life. Without judging things we would make choices based on nothing. Without it we would not like anything, but at the same time have nothing against everything, because it doesn’t matter since it’s not being judged. The world wouldn’t be able to function if there was no judgement. If people did not make choices to suit them and their family’s mental and physical health then the world would quickly fall apart. Without judgement everything would lose its purpose. We must choose because if we don’t we will be stuck frozen with indecisiveness, and progress will never be made. Nobody would have anything because they don’t know what they want, the endless choice blinds them from choosing things that they actually need to survive.


Choices play a critical role in life because indecisiveness is a silent killer. If everyone spent so much time trying to decide what they want to do in life then it’d be over before they could make a decision. No work would ever get done because nobody would be able to choose what work they want to do. I really don’t know how successful a society without judgement would be, because choices would have zero basis because you wouldn’t deem choosing one thing as any better than choosing another thing, making choosing anything ultimately pointless. Without judgement you take away purpose in a sense.


I really like how @green1234 said that differences in preference allow there to be different kinds of things in the world. This is very truthful because different people prefer different things, and having a variety of different things allows people who refer all different kinds of things to be happy, since what they prefer is provided. This relates to my thoughts that extends to how society also won’t function if nobody is happy. People need to feel happy with society they fit in or else they won’t follow it, and choice allows people to stay happy.


I also like how @dinosaur notes the difference between judgement and discrimination. Judgement being the way we deem one thing to be better than the other, or just to conclude the value of something. Judging is building up a variety of factors to figure out the worth of something. Then discriminating is choosing based on the conclusions we’ve made from judgement. Therefore, dinosaur is right in that judgement is necessary in the context of discrimination

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Orangutan
Posts: 6

Peppers and People

I think that discrimination, judgement and choice making are necessary sometimes but it's important to not do it too much. If you find yourself making large assumptions about people without giving them a chance first, then I think it's a good idea to reconsider your minds inner bias. Racism comes from assumptions that one race is inferior to another while that is easily disprovable with common sense. I think that discriminating/judging people is alright as long as it based on actual facts like, for example, a quarterly report in an office that is based on someone's performance. As long as a decision like that is not based on things that the person cant change then I think that that sort of judgement is alright. I think that the inherent need for choice is also tied much closer to American capitalism than I realized as Sheena Lyengar found. It is very interesting that something that feels so universal and necessary is not sought after in other parts of the world.

I also have been working to keep a critical eye on my own assumptions and inherent biases. If I see someone who looks “weird” or “odd” I try to reserve my judgement until I have more things to base a judgement of that person off of. I think that there is a grey zone of judgements and biases. I think it's safe to assume that everyone who calls themselves a neo-Nazi probably calls themselves that by choice and were not born with that title. I think that a good indicator of judging people is whether or not they were born with whatever you are judging them on. There should be a distinct line between judging peppers and people because people are not peppers. I think that a world without discrimination or judgement would be very hard to attain but not impossible. One of the biggest challenges for humans would be dealing with tribalism and the “us” and “them” that comes with that. It's like a double-edged sword because on one side it fuels our expansions and rapid development as a species but on the other, it has caused a lot of war and suffering in the world.

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Orangutan
Posts: 6

Originally posted by heyyy1234 on October 04, 2019 20:45

I feel like judgement is a very natural and innate characteristic in most all living things. People have this instant negative connotation to the word judgement-- as if it's some unspoken taboo trait despite us all sharing it. Subconsciously, we are constantly judging everything around us: people, food, places, clothes, the list goes on. We shouldn't necessarily beat ourselves up for judging because it's instinctive. When we are birthed into this world, we aren't good or bad, nor do we harbor judgement. As we grow older, however, we reflect and learn from our atmospheres and are able to craft our own definitions of good, bad, and everything in between-- that's what's so beautiful and unique about every single person on the planet. The thing about judgement is that it's not a choice, acting upon it is. We judge based off of our own truths and moral compasses. As Iyengar explains in her Ted-Talk: “we all make assumptions about the world—based on individual experience and cultural background—that affect our judgment of how that balance should look."' Our minds are constantly at a very explorative and vulnerable default; we always end up judging. Then, we beat ourselves up for judging as if it's something we can control. After that, we sort these thoughts into good, bad, and the in-between. Now, we know what to do and what not-to-do. I feel like we cannot necessarily speak upon anyone else when it comes to thoughts and feelings because only that individual knows their truth. It's not obligatory to share your beliefs with anyone, but when you start negatively affecting other people because of how you feel is when judgement becomes discrimination. There is a glass wall between the two.

The word discrimination essentially means bias. However, as history plays out, we come to learn that discrimination is also a social behavior where someone has a preference for one thing/ person over others based off of surface-level characteristics: race, gender, class, etc. As Iyengar explores choice, she says: “It's not a marker of liberation, but of suffocation by meaningless minutiae.” Some people are simply scared of choosing because they don't want to make the wrong choice. Regardless, it's still something we are all able to do. We aren't usually willing to explore the complexity of choice because our actions are often dictated by our comfort zones.Choice and judgements are necessities because they're convenient and--to an extent-- compose our individuality. In class when we did the pepper evaluation, a lot of people chose pepper #2 because it was a nice looking pepper. However, those who chose pepper #2 judged all the other peppers for being quite different from the seemingly ideal pepper. Everyone else who chose different peppers judged the fans of pepper #2. The peppers couldn't just exist and live their pepper lives: they were all forced into a ranking for our own benefit of making a choice. We didn't have to choose a pepper, but we all complied. We were told to make a choice and we did. We all had different criteria for the pepper that the other peppers lacked: length, width, girth, and aesthetic, and we chose to compare the peppers against each other. Judgment is only useful when it's needed. The poor guys didn't deserve that. Psychologically, we were reflecting our own values regarding physical appearance and use. I feel like it's really important for people to step out of their own perceptions and immerse themselves in other people's as well. What's the point of thinking if you only have your own perspective? Humans are at a constant state of growth-- we should always be actively creating a place in our minds that not only nurtures our own judgements and thoughts, but also welcomes those of others as well. We have a reliance on judgement because, again, it partially composes our identity. I feel like the idea of living in a world where we're all allowed to exist vulnerably would be ideal, but nearly impossible. Judging and discriminating runs in our blood, whether we want to believe it or not. Again, when we (negatively) act on them and affect other people is when judging crosses the line between harmony and chaos. Judgement can coexist with harmony, but the relationship is built on a foundation of tolerance.



I really enjoyed this post! the points were well though out and expressed very well. The line about acting upon judgement being the choice was extremely good and succinct. I also really liked the line that you drew between discrimination and judgement because to me, they had seemed like synonyms with different levels of intensity but now I understand the difference between the two.

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Purplelilac
Posts: 5

Human Nature

Originally posted by heyyy1234 on October 04, 2019 20:45

I feel like judgement is a very natural and innate characteristic in most all living things. People have this instant negative connotation to the word judgement-- as if it's some unspoken taboo trait despite us all sharing it. Subconsciously, we are constantly judging everything around us: people, food, places, clothes, the list goes on. We shouldn't necessarily beat ourselves up for judging because it's instinctive. When we are birthed into this world, we aren't good or bad, nor do we harbor judgement. As we grow older, however, we reflect and learn from our atmospheres and are able to craft our own definitions of good, bad, and everything in between-- that's what's so beautiful and unique about every single person on the planet. The thing about judgement is that it's not a choice, acting upon it is. We judge based off of our own truths and moral compasses. As Iyengar explains in her Ted-Talk: “we all make assumptions about the world—based on individual experience and cultural background—that affect our judgment of how that balance should look."' Our minds are constantly at a very explorative and vulnerable default; we always end up judging. Then, we beat ourselves up for judging as if it's something we can control. After that, we sort these thoughts into good, bad, and the in-between. Now, we know what to do and what not-to-do. I feel like we cannot necessarily speak upon anyone else when it comes to thoughts and feelings because only that individual knows their truth. It's not obligatory to share your beliefs with anyone, but when you start negatively affecting other people because of how you feel is when judgement becomes discrimination. There is a glass wall between the two.

The word discrimination essentially means bias. However, as history plays out, we come to learn that discrimination is also a social behavior where someone has a preference for one thing/ person over others based off of surface-level characteristics: race, gender, class, etc. As Iyengar explores choice, she says: “It's not a marker of liberation, but of suffocation by meaningless minutiae.” Some people are simply scared of choosing because they don't want to make the wrong choice. Regardless, it's still something we are all able to do. We aren't usually willing to explore the complexity of choice because our actions are often dictated by our comfort zones.Choice and judgements are necessities because they're convenient and--to an extent-- compose our individuality. In class when we did the pepper evaluation, a lot of people chose pepper #2 because it was a nice looking pepper. However, those who chose pepper #2 judged all the other peppers for being quite different from the seemingly ideal pepper. Everyone else who chose different peppers judged the fans of pepper #2. The peppers couldn't just exist and live their pepper lives: they were all forced into a ranking for our own benefit of making a choice. We didn't have to choose a pepper, but we all complied. We were told to make a choice and we did. We all had different criteria for the pepper that the other peppers lacked: length, width, girth, and aesthetic, and we chose to compare the peppers against each other. Judgment is only useful when it's needed. The poor guys didn't deserve that. Psychologically, we were reflecting our own values regarding physical appearance and use. I feel like it's really important for people to step out of their own perceptions and immerse themselves in other people's as well. What's the point of thinking if you only have your own perspective? Humans are at a constant state of growth-- we should always be actively creating a place in our minds that not only nurtures our own judgements and thoughts, but also welcomes those of others as well. We have a reliance on judgement because, again, it partially composes our identity. I feel like the idea of living in a world where we're all allowed to exist vulnerably would be ideal, but nearly impossible. Judging and discriminating runs in our blood, whether we want to believe it or not. Again, when we (negatively) act on them and affect other people is when judging crosses the line between harmony and chaos. Judgement can coexist with harmony, but the relationship is built on a foundation of tolerance.



I agree that judgement is a very natural occurrence in which it is in human nature to instinctively make assumptions about a person. When you first see someone, you observe the exterior, the physical characteristics that you can see without having to speak to that individual. Society has largely influenced the way we judge people, as stereotypes are formed by popular public assumptions about a general group of people. This then impacts the way we treat certain people of different cultures, religions, races, ethnicities, ages, etc. Although it is unfair to judge a person without knowing who they really are, it has been programmed in our minds to make mental observations about someone despite the way you want to interact or feel about them. We need to model for our younger generations that discrimination can not be tolerated. Fear has been instilled within the youth in order to keep white men in absolute power and overall authority.

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